Searching \ for 'Fast serial buses' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/io/serials.htm?key=serial
Search entire site for: 'Fast serial buses'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Fast serial buses'
1999\02\04@081022 by Morgan Olsson

picon face
For an upcoming project I am investigating serial buses.

What I have covered so far are RS485, I2C and CAN.

Right now I am looking on Ethernet and USB.

 Questions:

1) Anybody got a pointer to where to learn about ethernet protocol and bus?

2) Are there more buses I like theese above?


Thanks in advance
/Morgan
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
   Morgan Olsson                       ph  +46(0)414 70741
   MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK                fax +46(0)414 70331
   H€LLEKS               (in A-Z letters: "HALLEKAS")
   SE-277 35 KIVIK, SWEDEN                   spam_OUTmrtTakeThisOuTspaminame.com
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

1999\02\04@095156 by Chris Eddy

flavicon
face
Well, in light of the fact that you are in Europe, you really shold be looking
at Profibus.
You know the saying, when in Rome, do as the Romans do.. Profibus is the
Fieldbus of Europe.

Chris Eddy, PE
Pioneer Microsystems, Inc.

Morgan Olsson wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1999\02\04@125359 by w. v. ooijen / f. hanneman

picon face
> For an upcoming project I am investigating serial buses.
> What I have covered so far are RS485, I2C and CAN.
> Right now I am looking on Ethernet and USB.
>
>   Questions:
>
> 1) Anybody got a pointer to where to learn about ethernet protocol and
bus?
Why not try altavista or hotbot? You'll find plenty information!

> 2) Are there more buses I like theese above?
Yes, an awfull lot, including variants of the above.

Get a copy of A.Tannebaums book on networks!

regards,
Wouter.

1999\02\04@130611 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>Right now I am looking on Ethernet and USB.
>
>  Questions:
>
>1) Anybody got a pointer to where to learn about ethernet protocol and bus?
>
>2) Are there more buses I like theese above?

http://www.vermontlife.com/gary/crystal

Andy



  \-----------------/
   \     /---\     /
    \    |   |    /          Andy Kunz
     \   /---\   /           Montana Design
/---------+   +---------\     http://www.montanadesign.com
| /  |----|___|----|  \ |
\/___|      *      |___\/     Go fast, turn right,
                              and keep the wet side down!

1999\02\04@151637 by Morgan Olsson

picon face
>1) Anybody got a pointer to where to learn about ethernet protocol and
>bus?
>Why not try altavista or hotbot? You'll find plenty information!

Information ??
I get a lot of *noise*; the problem is to dig out the information... ;)


>> 2) Are there more buses I like theese above?
>Yes, an awfull lot, including variants of the above.

OK,  I«ll clarify myself:  I am not interested in the higher layer
protocols, as we have some odd requirements.   What we really are looking
for are the chips, controllers etc, and possibly the lowest error detection
and correection etc layer where included  (like CAN).

We could roll our own, but if there already exist good chips, why bother.
And for established standards there are also nice debugging tools :)




Especially I am looking for Ethernet specification.

Who owns Ethernet?  (I think i shold look there)


whatever is http://www.ethernet.org ?!
Somebody who has regged teh name to earn money when selling it?
Or is this really the site?  Where to get the key in that case ??




PS

If somebody has replied to this subject during the last hours, please
repost, as I got unsubscribed by Jory as I have an iname account.  
(You did the right thing though, Jory!)

DS


>Get a copy of A.Tannebaums book on networks!
>
>
>regards,
>Wouter.
>
>
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
   Morgan Olsson                       ph  +46(0)414 70741
   MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK                fax +46(0)414 70331
   H€LLEKS               (in A-Z letters: "HALLEKAS")
   SE-277 35 KIVIK, SWEDEN                   mrtspamKILLspaminame.com
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

1999\02\04@170454 by Lee Jones

flavicon
face
>>> 1) Anybody got a pointer to where to learn about ethernet
>>> protocol and bus?

>>> 2) Are there more buses I like theese above?

> OK,  I'll clarify myself:  I am not interested in the higher
> layer protocols, as we have some odd requirements.   What we
> really are looking for are the chips, controllers etc, and
> possibly the lowest error detection and correection etc layer
> where included  (like CAN).
>
> We could roll our own, but if there already exist good chips,
> why bother.  And for established standards there are also nice
> debugging tools :)

There are quite a few Ethernet chip sets out there.  This is
off the top of my head...

Check Intel for 82586 and 82596; check Digital Equipment Corp
(DEC, now owned by Compaq) semiconductor division for 21041
and 21141; check National Semi; check AMD.

Some Motorola 683xx CPUs for embedded markets have serial ports
that can do 10Mbps on chip.  They can do Ethernet by adding a
protection/interface network.  So Motorola may have application
notes with Ethernet information.


> Especially I am looking for Ethernet specification.
> Who owns Ethernet?  (I think i shold look there)

Originally, Ethernet was defined by a triumverate of DEC,
Intel, and Xerox.  They published the original specs for
the 3Mbps version.  It was soon upgraded to 10Mbps where
it got serious market penetration.

IEEE took over or joined in -- not sure if IEEE "owns" it
-- but check IEEE 802.3.


> whatever is http://www.ethernet.org ?! Somebody who has [registered]
> the name to earn money when selling it?

Seems like a reasonable guess to me.  I'd never heard of it.

                                               Lee Jones

1999\02\04@180959 by Russell McMahon

picon face
Then, there's "Firewire".
Faster than USB (in the 100's of megabits per second range)

>> 2) Are there more buses I like theese above?
>>
>> Thanks in advance
>> /Morgan

1999\02\04@193609 by paulb

flavicon
face
Lee Jones wrote:

> Check Intel for 82586 and 82596;

 The *original* chipset is (NatSemi) 8390 (controller), 8391
(serialiser) and 8392 (line interface).  There are many "improved"
versions such as the above, some are 16-bit and some include the buffer
RAM.

 I managed to find datasheets for the "839x" variants which, with some
work, should permit you to write a protocol.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\02\04@200725 by Bob Drzyzgula

flavicon
face
On Thu, Feb 04, 1999 at 09:04:09PM +0100, Morgan Olsson wrote:
> >1) Anybody got a pointer to where to learn about ethernet protocol and
> >bus?
>
> OK,  I«ll clarify myself:  I am not interested in the higher layer
> protocols, as we have some odd requirements.   What we really are looking
> for are the chips, controllers etc, and possibly the lowest error detection
> and correection etc layer where included  (like CAN).
>
> We could roll our own, but if there already exist good chips, why bother.
> And for established standards there are also nice debugging tools :)
>
> Especially I am looking for Ethernet specification.
>
> Who owns Ethernet?  (I think i shold look there)

Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox, having been developed
by them in conjunction with DEC and Intel. It is an
implementation of an even older network protocol idea,
called Carrier Sense, Multiple Access with Collision
Detection (CSMA/CD). Ethernet, as originally specified by
those companies, was a baseband, broadcast network carried
over a thick, 50 Ohm Coaxial cable, which almost without
exception had a yellow PVC jacket. It was also usually
marked, by hand with a felt-tip pen, every -- I think it
was -- 2.5m. One attached stations to these cables (at the
marks to minimize destructive reflections) either through
terminating the ends with huge, nasty solder-on connectors
and running the ends into two sides of a tranceiver, or
cutting away a little circle of jacket and shield on one
side and clamping on a tap that drove a probe down into
the dielectric to touch the center conductor; these were
"vampire taps". But enough of that.

Eventually, the IEEE set up a working group on Local &
Metropolitan Area Networks; this was (is) the 802 committee.
The 802.1 standard covers common definitions for all
LAN/MAN technologies, and inclues things like bridges.

802.3 is the standard that defines the CSMA/CD access
method. 802.4 is the token-passing bus, which is sort of
like an Ethernet bus but with a token-passing protocol
imposed on it; it was mostly used for manufacturing
networks. 802.5 is the token passing ring.  802.6 is the
Distributed Queue Dual Bus access method; these access
method standards go up to 802.12 or so by now.

All these standards may be purchased from the IEEE,
check out http://standards.ieee.org/catalog/index.html.
Some documents are less than $50 or so, some cost
hundreds of dollars.

There are subtle differences in framing between Ethernet
(TM) and 802.3 networks, but (a) one hardly ever sees
real Ethernets anymore, and (b) most "ethernet" MAC chips
can handle either framing.

One Ethernet chip you might take a look at is the Crystal 8900
(see http://www.cirrus.com/products/overviews/cs8900a.html).
I've seen it used in some embedded designs (e.g. some
JumpTec [http://www.jump.de] PC-104 CPU boards that I've
used have them), and it seems to be very small and consume
little power.  Cirrus Logic seems, from what I can tell,
to be pretty forthcoming with the technical information
one would need to make them work (others can correct
me if I'm wrong about this). I note, for example,
that they have a Linux driver -- in source code form --
for the chip available on their website. This made it
possible for me to get Linux running on a Jump board,
and I sent them a big thank-you for that.

I suppose that one hurdle you might have to deal with
is that most Ethernet chips will probably have an
on-chip ISA or PCI interface. If you can straightforwardly
glue the ISA interface into a PIC, it might be pretty
easy, as you suggest.  But I'm no expert on this kind of
stuff and could be totally wrong about this.

>From what you say you are doing -- looking for some sort
of moderately fast protocol with a pre-existing and easily
tapped knowledge base and easily obtained, cheap silicon,
one book (of many, no doubt) that you might find helpful is
the Principals of Computer Networking, by D. Russell. It is
an older book, first published in 1989, but I have never
found another book that does as good a job of explaining
networking technology from a historical and evolutionary
perspective; after reading that book, a long time ago, I
found that networking made a great deal more sense to me,
and I found it much easier to see similarities in protocols
that before that seemed all completely different to me.
It is written well enough to count as recreational reading,
I highly recommend it.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0521339928/qid%3D918175230/002-9133948-5405425

Hope this helps,

--Bob

--
============================================================
Bob Drzyzgula                             It's not a problem
.....bobKILLspamspam.....drzyzgula.org                until something bad happens
============================================================

1999\02\04@211033 by Bob Drzyzgula

flavicon
face
On Thu, Feb 04, 1999 at 12:34:27PM -0500, Andy Kunz wrote:
>
> http://www.vermontlife.com/gary/crystal

Very cool. (I swear I only saw this *after* my reply :-)

BTW, the above URL needs an .html at the end or one
gets a 404. http://www.vermontlife.com/gary/crystal.html
works.

--Bob

--
============================================================
Bob Drzyzgula                             It's not a problem
EraseMEbobspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTdrzyzgula.org                until something bad happens
============================================================

1999\02\05@093630 by WIL REEDER

flavicon
face
Hi Andy
There is some info on Firewire and USB in Jan 99 Electronics World
(British). Magazine should be available at Chapters & the like. If you want
it and can't find it email me OFF LIST.


Wil Reeder
teachtechspamspam_OUTbc.sympatico.ca
Vancouver,Canada 0x33
solar,wind,tide, TEG  renewable energy

----------
| From: Russell McMahon <@spam@apptechKILLspamspamCLEAR.NET.NZ>
| To: KILLspamPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
| Subject: Re: Fast serial buses
| Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 11:39 AM
|
| Then, there's "Firewire".
| Faster than USB (in the 100's of megabits per second range)
|
| >> 2) Are there more buses I like theese above?
| >>
| >> Thanks in advance
| >> /Morgan

1999\02\05@201113 by Graeme Smith

flavicon
face
Hi....

About Ethernet...

it's an IEEE standard 802.3 sub something or other

It's not seen as a bus, but as a Local area network connection.

there are a lot of different versions, since it has grown with the
capability of the nic's.

I understand right now they are completing the specification for a
really fast optical connection. The primary problem being the quality
of the specified connectors exceeds some manufactorers tolerances.

Good luck finding just one datasheet....

                               GREY

GRAEME SMITH                         email: RemoveMEgrysmithTakeThisOuTspamfreenet.edmonton.ab.ca
YMCA Edmonton

Address has changed with little warning!
(I moved across the hall! :) )

Email will remain constant... at least for now.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1999 , 2000 only
- Today
- New search...