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PICList Thread
'Electrolytic Capacitor fun [ot]'
1998\09\17@173637 by Chris Eddy

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Couldn't resist this topic, after all of the fun we had in college.

I was the guy that showed up at college with all of my boxes of parts
(considered to be bizare behavior ten years ago in engineering school).  We
would sit around the apartment and blow up parts. We took a lamp cord,
laced the wires onto the part, lay it on the floor (in a pan or something),
and plug in.  Some parts are quite spectacular.  IC's blow apart with a
shower of sparks 4 or 5 feet long sometimes, and when they calm down they
reduce to a glowing blob of molten (??).  The electrolytics were not nearly
as much fun, because when they did blow up, they just went 'crack' and the
guts would shoot out somewhere.  No sparks to speak of.  The problem with
them was that we kept blowing the fuse in the fuse box, and had to put in
another.  It wasn't long on a student budget and limitted fuses to tire of
that method.  Sometime I'll have to relate the difficulty you would have in
throwing a cinder block through a 26" picture tube.  It is much harder than
one would think.  We found that it was easier to toss them off of the third
story.  It was faster.  The TV, not the cinder block.

Chris Eddy
Reformed unsafe person
Pioneer Microsystems, Inc.

1998\09\17@182319 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
LOL, I have had my share of blowing up parts, but rarely on purpose :)

BTW, Have any of you tried pickels? Yes! I am not joking at all! If you
CAREFULLY take two metal forks and stick them into two opposite ends of a
pickel (not sure if a specific kind is necessary), and attach the two forks
to 120VAC, the pickel will glow with the wonderful characteristic sodium
yellow light (from the sodium ions in the pickling solution). For a few
minutes anyway (while you can still stand the smell and before it bursts
into flames) you will have yourself a sodium (not really vapor) lamp. Be
sure to keep this away from any flamable material as it will eventually
catch fire.

Our chemistry teacher did this demonstration in high school.

Disclaimer: I am not responsible for anyone who gets hurt or destroys
anything doing this.

Sean

At 05:27 PM 9/17/98 -0400, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
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1998\09\17@183322 by paulb

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Chris Eddy wrote:

> I was the guy that showed up at college with all of my boxes of parts

 Dud parts, presumably?

> (considered to be bizare behavior ten years ago in engineering
> school).

 Undoubtedly still is!

> The problem with them was that we kept blowing the fuse in the fuse
> box, and had to put in another.  It wasn't long on a student budget
> and limitted fuses to tire of that method.

 Single-use cartridge fuses are a *relatively* recent innovation here.
Fuse wire was cheap; no problem.  A second "swap" fuse with double the
wire was used whilst welding etc.  But fuses are no longer used anyway.

 Did it not occur to you to wire up a socket in series and plug in two
radiators (in parallel, with a double-adaptor)?

> We found that it was easier to toss them off of the third story.  It
> was faster.  The TV, not the cinder block.

 I must be getting conservative in my old age.  Who cleaned up the
mess, you can't tell me no-one noticed the heap of shattered TV tubes?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\09\17@190056 by Mark Willis

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Chris Eddy wrote:
{Quote hidden}

 The easy way to blow a TV tube up:

 Put it face down so the neck sticks straight up.  Hit it at the base
of the neck, right in the curve where the neck melds into the rest of
the tube.

 Did this in Jr. High School for a demo, I (of course!) volunteered for
the shop class (Teacher was in a wheelchair from a motorcycle accident
that left him disabled), I was wearing a full face shield & full body
apron, had a 20 foot long "T" shaped metal bar to hit it;  Some nice
sized pieces went past me, 25-30 feet or so from the tube.  Sort of an
implosion/explosion.  Not too hard to break the tube this way.  I
wouldn't want to hit it there without being far away & behind protective
gear (In a cabinet, probably less of a problem.)

 Someone else even got volunteered to clean up!  <G>

 Mark, .....mwillisKILLspamspam@spam@nwlink.com

1998\09\17@232910 by Dan Larson

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Ahhh,,, fun memories that still bring a grin to my face!

Blowing things up was fun.  Especially when I couldn't identify a part
or find it useless for some other reason...

He He He, I used to like run the bench top AC power supply into
electrolytic caps!  It was much quicker than using DC.  I would put
them into a drawer with the leads hanging out connected to the power
supply.  He He He great fun!  Burned caps really smell bad though...

Smashed my share of CRT's too.. Sort of a teenage electro-geek's version
of a Pin~iata <SP> using a large rock.  It is best if you smash them at night
because you can see the arcs as the stored charge is disipated!

The best fun was the old 12-inch speaker soaked with flammable
petroleum distillates plugged into the switched AC outlet in the
garage trick!  "BZZZZZT - POOOF!" , I'm lucky I didn't burn the
house down!

That was all when I was less than half the age I am now.

Now that it is my own house & children living with me, such reckless
fun is no longer an option. :-(

Eventually I just got tired of blowing up parts and just settled down
to sane levels of experimentation and actually building things instead
of blowing things up. <G>

On Fri, 18 Sep 1998 08:30:27 +1000, Paul B. Webster VK2BZC wrote:

>Chris Eddy wrote:
>
>> I was the guy that showed up at college with all of my boxes of parts

[SNIP SNIP SNIP]

Dan

1998\09\17@235636 by Lynx {Glenn Jones}

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Well, hate to waste banwidth, but anyone who does this experiment might
notice something quite interesting... the pickel always glows at only one
of the forks. It flips between the forks, but always lights up only one of
the forks. This means that the pickel is working as some sort of a
rectifier. Imagine... Pickle based transitors, ic's, even PIC's ;)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A member of the PI-100 Club:
3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841971693993751
058209749445923078164062862089986280348253421170679

On Thu, 17 Sep 1998, Sean Breheny wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\09\18@024318 by Morgan Olsson

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>BTW, Have any of you tried pickels?

Please somebody explain what pickels is?

/Morgan
/  Morgan Olsson, MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK, SE-277 35 KIVIK, Sweden \
\  .....mrtKILLspamspam.....iname.com, ph: +46 (0)414 70741; fax +46 (0)414 70331    /

1998\09\18@025128 by Lee Jones

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>> BTW, Have any of you tried pickels?

> Please somebody explain what pickels is?

Spelling is pickle.  Food; usually side dish.  Cucumber
pickled in brine (salt water) & spices [I think] to give
varieties such as dill pickles, sweet pickles, etc.
Served whole, sliced, chopped into relish, etc.

Whole pickles are used for the glowing food experiment.

                                               Lee Jones

1998\09\18@030201 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   >BTW, Have any of you tried pickels?

   Please somebody explain what pickels is?

A food item.  Cucumbers cured in acidic brine (salt and vinegar.)

BillW

1998\09\18@044715 by Michael Day

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When did this list turn into a cooking show?



{Quote hidden}

1998\09\18@074625 by Tom Handley

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  LOL! We've been pickling lot's of cucumbers from the garden recently. I
should reserve some for R&D ;-)

  Our favorite `Electrolytic prank' was to charge large caps to 600V or so
and toss them to an unsuspecting student ;-)

  - Tom

At 08:54 PM 9/17/98 -0700, Glenn Jones wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\09\18@084954 by Andy Kunz

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>and plug in.  Some parts are quite spectacular.  IC's blow apart with a
>shower of sparks 4 or 5 feet long sometimes, and when they calm down they

We used D cells.

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\09\18@103418 by Peter L. Peres

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> pickels

There is a very serious experiment that has been set up and run in a
"scientific" lab. The paper is available on the web, I've read it, but I
don't have the URL. I seem to remember that I got there following some
Amateur Scientist magazine online links, and that it was done by reputable
HP scientists ? Try to search the web for pickels + electro-luminiscence.

Peter

1998\09\18@103428 by Peter L. Peres

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> pranks

The worst one done to me was done by a co-worker. He soldered a 100 uF 350
V cap to the 2 sides of an unetched piece of PCB, put a large adhesive
sticker on its back saying 'Peter: don't touch this', charged the cap, and
put it in the middle of my desk when i went out for lunch. The bastard
also set up an 8mm video camera on his table to cover the area. Of course
the paper tape sticker covered the cap completely.

When I came back with an icecream in my hand, I stopped looking at the
thing, then touched it with the free hand. It zapped me, so I dropped the
ice cream I was holding in the other hand, and it went into my right baggy
pant's pocket, which was bulging out. By this time he was rofl. I was so
incredulous that I took the thing in my hand for a second time. Sheesh.

He then spent a few days watching the event on tape while checking out
cameras behind me, until I got hold of the tape and made it disappear.

For some reason or other, people who are concerned for safety don't do
such jokes and don't find them funny.

In school we used to leave polycarbonate 0.1 uF / 400 Vs with a 1N4004
diode soldered on for instant charging, lying around everywhere, including
on the teacher's desk. The terminals were wrapped around the cap so you
couldn't touch it without getting zapped (we used a paper napkin to
manipulate them). I seem to remember that they were good for zapping for
about 5-10 minutes after charge ;)

Peter

1998\09\18@103619 by Peter L. Peres

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On Fri, 18 Sep 1998, Morgan Olsson wrote:

> >BTW, Have any of you tried pickels?
>
> Please somebody explain what pickels is?

Salzgurken ;)

Peter

1998\09\18@104421 by Matt Bonner

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Mark Willis wrote:

>   The easy way to blow a TV tube up:
>
>   Put it face down so the neck sticks straight up.  Hit it at the base
> of the neck, right in the curve where the neck melds into the rest of
> the tube.
>
Someone mentioned BeO (Beryllium Oxide) in the thread that started this
one.  From my many-years-ago working on TVs, I seem to remember that BeO
can also be found in TV tubes.  T or F?

--Matt

1998\09\18@122318 by Peter L. Peres

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On Fri, 18 Sep 1998, Matt Bonner wrote:

> Someone mentioned BeO (Beryllium Oxide) in the thread that started this
> one.  From my many-years-ago working on TVs, I seem to remember that BeO
> can also be found in TV tubes.  T or F?

In my hazy memory BeO or ZrO is used to insulate the filament of expensive
(high power/compact) indirectly heated tubes from the cathode.  This
includes some CRTs. Anyway, non-insulated filaments and the cathodes
proper are coated with ThO (which is just as poisonous and also
radioactive for good measure) and exotic rare earth salts (which are good
at shedding electrons when heated) that vary from deadly to worse than
that in human toxicity. Fortunately the amounts used are very small. If
this is not enough, then consider the getter which is made of magnesium or
calcium in metallic sponge form and can catch fire in contact with air
from the atmosphere, or more exactly, water, throwing NaOH, KOH, CaOH or
MgOH in sizzling hot drops at one's eyes. The catching of the fire can
happen later after the tube has no vacuum in it and people are examining
the debris, by contact with water (sweat, humid fingers). If you are in
the habit of smashing tubes take some distance and dispose of the debris
properly, also wash your hands. ThO and other components will stay in your
skin for weeks otherwise.

Peter

1998\09\19@072519 by paulb

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Lynx {Glenn Jones} wrote:

> the pickel always glows at only one of the forks.  It flips between
> the forks, but always lights up only one of the forks.

 I'd strongly suspect that the effect relates to arcing in steam where-
ever the contact is currently driest.

Peter L. Peres wrote:

>> Please somebody explain what pickels is?
> Salzgurken ;)

 We call them Gherkins.

Andy Kunz wrote:

>> IC's blow apart with a shower of sparks 4 or 5 feet long sometimes,
> We used D cells.

 Alkaline I presume?  I've only tried the cells from 9V alkalines, with
the positive end straight *down*, outside.  It was a *long* time ago but
I'm sure my son would appreciate de-doing it.  I used 12VAC, 24VAC would
undoubtedly be better, perhaps the welder would be the best thing!
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\09\19@082246 by Russell McMahon

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Reminds me of things i had all but forgotten about.
The university engineering school labs had benches with LOTS of power
points, horizontally mounted at the tops of the benches, all switched
by a single switch per bench.
We had LOTS of "unmarked, untested" metal can transistors.
The power was turned OFF.
The power was carefully checked.
A salvo/broadside of transistors were loaded into the power points.
One hid at the end of the row and gingerly reached for the switch.
One other kept safety watch (killing people was forbidden).
Power on - Estes eat you heart out.
Some exploded on the spot. Some shot metal cans down the lab. Noise
smoke and flame galore!
No-one ever got hurt.
Perhaps we were lucky.
Don't try this at home - your mileage may vary.
.

       Russell McMahon

{Original Message removed}

1998\09\19@082250 by Russell McMahon

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A less dangerous (perhaps) capacitor experiment may be carried out in
offices with carpet that generates esd on people. One person
shuffling across the carpet on a dry day will make a somewhat painful
crack when touching a filing cabinet. Two people holding hands will
make a nastier crack which is felt by both but most by the spark-ee.
A line of shuffling people may approach an independent person and zap
him/her with outstretched finger (ET style?) causing zaps for all but
mostly for the spark sender and recipient.
.
Once you realize whats going on it is a thing of dread to be met by a
line of shuffling hand holding people. The company where this was
done was, at that stage, government owned, which may account for this
highly productive use of time ? :-).


{Original Message removed}

1998\09\19@101158 by paulb

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Russell McMahon wrote:

> Once you realize whats going on it is a thing of dread to be met by a
> line of shuffling hand holding people.

 But the defense is to walk around carrying a large bunch of keys!

 In winter, I hold the door latch (the "staple" attached to the pillar)
as I get out of the car.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\09\19@111129 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sun, 20 Sep 1998, Paul B. Webster VK2BZC wrote:

> Russell McMahon wrote:
>
> > Once you realize whats going on it is a thing of dread to be met by a
> > line of shuffling hand holding people.
>
>   But the defense is to walk around carrying a large bunch of keys!

This may work, but we used to help the shuffling by having a few good
turns on a Van de Graaf with a person wearing those super-thick plastic
soled sports (?) shoes, having a hand on the ball. He then went 'hunting'
with a 50 cm metal ruler held firmly in the hand ;).

Also, FYI usual metal locks/doorknobs, as in lab door, are excellently
insulated from the floor and a Van de Graaf's ball can be easily attached
with a number of crocodile wires from the inside... (PS: DON'T DO THIS TO
ELDERLY PEOPLE ! A ZAP IS ALL IT TAKES SOMETIMES ! THIS IS DANGEROUS. I
MEAN IT.)

>   In winter, I hold the door latch (the "staple" attached to the pillar)
> as I get out of the car.

Buy a grounding strip or expect your radio's input stage to die sooner or
later. I've heard of someone toasting the ECU in such a situation by
holding the ignition key in the lock while putting a leg outside. Zapped
the bejesus out of him and the ECU died on the spot. He has 3 grounding
strips ever since ;)

Peter

1998\09\19@111350 by g.daniel.invent.design

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Years ago my father was a plumber.

Messing around in the polytech one day they filled a lead box with
acetalene gas and tried to blow it up.
*of course* they needed another ingredient.

After adding oxygen and repeating the experiment, the results were
spectacular. There was no lead fragments to be found from the explosion.
Presumably it had vaporised or burned and recondensed/recompined as lead
oxide.

Graham Daniel,
Electronic Product Enhancements.


Russell McMahon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\09\19@113421 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
Another fun thing to try, especially to convince yourself of how hot sparks
caused by inductive kick really are is this:

Take a relay and wire it up so that it self-oscilates (the NC contact in
series with the coil) and attach to a stout power supply (battery is best,
to prevent spikes from damaging the supply). Many relays will actually MELT
themselves apart and unsolder their own connections this way. On one, I was
even able to melt large amounts of solder on the moving contacts! This same
relay ended up soldering itself toggther and melting its plastic case.

This also creates a nice spark gap transmitter!

Sean



At 05:49 PM 9/19/98 +0000, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
shb7spamspam_OUTcornell.edu  Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315 ICQ #: 3329174

1998\09\19@114047 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
There is almost a "resonant" type effect when you hit exactly the correct
stoichiometric ratio of oxygen to fuel. This can make an explosion that is
MUCH greater than just a little oxygen and too much fuel, or not enough
fuel and too much oxygen. Of course, it is VERY dangerous to mix fuel and
oxygen (especially pure). Remember that temperature is a statistical
quantity, and that actually at room temp, there are many molecules in a gas
that are at MUCH higher energies. So, whenever you create a concentrated
higly flamable mixture, there are always some reactions going on in it and
there is always a chance that enough of them will occur at once to start a
chain reation which leads to an explosion. The more concentrated the
mixture, the purer the mixture, and the more highly pressurized the
mixture, the more dangerous it is.

Sean

At 03:11 AM 9/20/98 +1200, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
@spam@shb7KILLspamspamcornell.edu  Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315 ICQ #: 3329174

1998\09\19@131150 by Chris Eddy

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Sean Breheny wrote:

> Take a relay and wire it up so that it self-oscilates (the NC contact in
> series with the coil) and attach to a stout power supply (battery is best,
> to prevent spikes from damaging the supply). Many relays will actually MELT

Um, I'm really sealing my fate here, but in Jr high I would build the self
oscillating relay strapped to a 9V battery, and take one of the leads from the
relay out on a 3" wire.  I would then sneak up on people and touch the wire to
them.  It was a huge thrill to see people leap out of their chairs.  The most
sinister approach was to get a fellow when he was sitting stopped over slightly
in that gap between his shirt and pants.  I swear, it is suprising nobody ever
soiled themselves.  That activity was one that I actually never paid a
punishment for.  The teachers were all too interested in what I had built.

Chris Eddy
Pioneer Microsystems, Inc.

1998\09\19@132227 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Sat, 19 Sep 1998, Chris Eddy wrote:

> Um, I'm really sealing my fate here, but in Jr high I would build the self
> oscillating relay strapped to a 9V battery, and take one of the leads from the
> relay out on a 3" wire.  I would then sneak up on people and touch the wire to

FYI there is a schematic of a shocker circulating on the web, that is
built just like this, but adds a mains transformer wired as up-transformer
in parallel with the relay coil. There is also a capacitor in parallel
with the coils to slow the switching down a bit (and add some
self-resonating punch to the primary I suppose). From what I read, it
works TOO well. Ouch.

Peter

1998\09\19@133722 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
I have seen comercial "gag" devices similar to this. What did you do for
the second connection? You only had one 3" wire?!

Sean


At 01:01 PM 9/19/98 -0400, you wrote:
>
>Um, I'm really sealing my fate here, but in Jr high I would build the self
>oscillating relay strapped to a 9V battery, and take one of the leads from
the
>relay out on a 3" wire.  I would then sneak up on people and touch the
wire to
>them.  It was a huge thrill to see people leap out of their chairs.  The most
>sinister approach was to get a fellow when he was sitting stopped over
slightly
>in that gap between his shirt and pants.  I swear, it is suprising nobody
ever
>soiled themselves.  That activity was one that I actually never paid a
>punishment for.  The teachers were all too interested in what I had built.
>
>Chris Eddy
>Pioneer Microsystems, Inc.
>
+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
KILLspamshb7KILLspamspamcornell.edu  Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315 ICQ #: 3329174

1998\09\19@155928 by Mark Willis

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face
Russell McMahon wrote:
> <snipped>
> Once you realize whats going on it is a thing of dread to be met by a
> line of shuffling hand holding people. The company where this was
> done was, at that stage, government owned, which may account for this
> highly productive use of time ? :-).

 My girlfriend complained to me about being zapped regularly in one
building which had horrid plastic or nylon carpets;  I built her a
foot-long wood rod with a 1 Meg resistor, initially, we eventually made
a sort of ring for her.  Elevator control panels are usually quite well
grounded <G>

 Mark, RemoveMEmwillisTakeThisOuTspamnwlink.com

1998\09\19@202730 by Chris Eddy

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Sean Breheny wrote:

> I have seen comercial "gag" devices similar to this. What did you do for
> the second connection? You only had one 3" wire?!

That was it.  I probably discovered that it would work like this by touching tha
t
point by mistake and getting tickled.  One would presume that it is capacitively
coupled to the world.  Imagine your body wants to remain at one potential, my ha
nd
and body at another.  The healthy change in voltage makes our xxpF bodies transf
er
charge.

1998\09\20@215122 by Russell McMahon

picon face
I had a friend at high school who was seriously into building shock
boxes. He got them down to a fine art. At 1st year university he
handed in a "lost" box to a lecturer who was so unimpressed when he
opened it that he set ouit to make ny friends life hell in every way
he could.
Think carefully about other people's reactions to what you may
consider to be ".harmless fun".
(This of course also applies to my afore-mentioned line of carpet
shufflers ;-))
{Original Message removed}

1998\09\21@114007 by Gary Crowell Sr.

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Back in '67-'69 era, Popular Electronics magazine had a project called
the 'tickle stick', which was a battery powered oscillator that fed
backwards thru a filament transformer.  It was fabulous.  I had to
rebuild it several times, as it got thrown across the room a lot.

GC

1998\09\21@122830 by Ryan Bloom

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face
I'll jump on the band-wagon.  I've done the exact same at my old high
school!
The resemblance to the below story is uncanny, although it would usually
only happen when there was a substitute teacher.  We would all be sitting in
the desk portion of the electronics/engineering class and someone would ask
the sub to turn on the lab area power.  Needless to say, we would never have
the same sub.

DISCLAMER: Not liable for any admission in above statement! :)

-Ryan

{Original Message removed}

1998\09\22@055601 by g.daniel.invent.design

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But wait ! there's more !

Chemistry, a female who shall remain nameless (to those not in the know)
poured waste carbon tetrachloride down the sink. This was a lab with
sinks spaced several to each of 3 walls.   Some time later I go to put
out a sulphur flame on specimen holder and : BANG..     BANG
BANG..       BANG BANG.. etc around the class room. (the drains were
linked.)

Almost as good as the time two classmates tried my recipe for **CONTACT
EXPLOSIVE, NAME SENSORED** at school late one Friday.  Didn't "work" so
they dumped it in the sink.   On the following Monday morning our
teacher was demonstrating an experiment.  While talking to class, he
began to rinse a beaker in preparation. Unknown to the teacher the
"sludge" in the beaker and sink was dried and ready to impress.

**CONTACT EXPLOSIVE, NAME SENSORED** when dry is unreasonably sensitive,
on contact with water, bumping, the wrong sound and it's making
history.  Our teacher made a most excelent standing jump on the
detonation. OBTW no injury, although speaking from experience, the
pressure wave is tough on thumbs, fingers etc.

Regards,
Graham Daniel,
(Electronic Product Enhancements.)


Ryan Bloom wrote:
>
> I'll jump on the band-wagon.  I've done the exact same at my old high
> school!
> The resemblance to the below story is uncanny, although it would usually
> only happen when there was a substitute teacher.  We would all be sitting in
> the desk portion of the electronics/engineering class and someone would ask
> the sub to turn on the lab area power.  Needless to say, we would never have
> the same sub.
>

1998\09\22@094019 by Andy Kunz

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>Almost as good as the time two classmates tried my recipe for **CONTACT
>EXPLOSIVE, NAME SENSORED** at school late one Friday.  Didn't "work" so
>they dumped it in the sink.   On the following Monday morning our
>teacher was demonstrating an experiment.  While talking to class, he
>began to rinse a beaker in preparation. Unknown to the teacher the
>"sludge" in the beaker and sink was dried and ready to impress.

We used to make NI3 in chem class and leave "samples" all around the
school.  My brother was (is?) a pyro, so I learned all about this and other
wonderful things long before my peers, and was able to use this knowledge
for fun.

Pencil sharpeners will come apart with the proper application (apply moist
with the end of a pencil in the sharpener, turn sharpener one or two
rounds, remove pencil).  NI3 covers all the cutting edges, and as soon as a
new pencil is inserted and the handle cranked, the unit self-destructs.

There were other things we did which were tremendous fun, though now I know
some were probably illegal.  Oh well, it was childish ignorance.

Andy


==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\09\22@094348 by lilel

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OK OK  I can't stop laughing.  We had a similar lab, with a power
strip on each bench.  The janitor got sick of resertting circuit
breakers, so he put a 40 AMP feed to each bench (thus violating the
national electric code.)  We would turn off the power strip, plug
each end of a fat, 3" length of solder into the outlets, get behind
the bench, turn it on,  and Ka BANG!   Our instructor was not very
amused at these things.



> A salvo/broadside of transistors were loaded
> into the power points. One hid at the end of the row and gingerly
> reached for the switch
-- Lawrence Lile

"If this were easy they'd have hired somebody else to do it."

Download AutoCad blocks for electrical drafting at:
http://home1.gte.net/llile/index.htm

1998\09\22@095332 by lilel

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face
Mark Willis sez

>   The easy way to blow a TV tube up:
>
>   Put it face down so the neck sticks straight up.  Hit it at the
>   base
> of the neck,


Nah, that's the easy way.  Take it out into a big field, get out your
.22 caliber rifle and load it with magnums or longs, and blast away
at the FRONT of the tube.  It will take four or five shots at the
same spot (marksmanship is required here) to burst it.  Don't get too
close!

See the illustration of "Edward Abbeys Parting Shot" in the September
?? 1993 issue of Mother Earth News for a demonstration.  Ol' Tree
Spikin Ed is standing next to a TV, posing with a deer rifle, with a
nice round target blasted into the screen.  (he didn't like TV.)


Don't try any of these things at home they are dangerous.  I know, I
tried em.
-- Lawrence Lile

"If this were easy they'd have hired somebody else to do it."

Download AutoCad blocks for electrical drafting at:
http://home1.gte.net/llile/index.htm

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