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'Driving a 2N5192 power transistor from a PIC.'
1999\05\17@125603 by Adam Bryant

picon face
I recently picked up a number of 2N5192's surplus and would like to use
them to construct an H Bridge motor controller (controlled from a PIC of
course).  The motor I will be driving will draw around 1.5A.  My power
supply is a 12v 5A battery.  The problem (if I read the datasheet
correctly) is that the "Collector-Emitter Saturation Voltage" of the 5192
is specified as Ic=1.5Adc, Ib=0.15Adc.  As I understand this, for my
Collector-Emitter current to be the 1.5amps I need to drive the motor, I
need to drive the Base with 150mA. Is this correct?  So my thought was to
add another transistor between the PIC and the 2N5192's to amplify the
signal from the 20mA the PIC can source to the 150mA needed for the
2N5192.  Seem reasonable?  Are there any other options for doing this
using the 5192's?  I would hate to have to use 8 transisitors per motor
H-bridge.

I'm not emotionally attached to the 5192's, so if there is another option
that is easier, let me know.  I do recall a discussion a few months ago
about logic level MOSFETs (IIRC).  If these would be easier, let me know
a part number and I will pursue that angle instead.

Sorry for the basic electronics questions, but I am a programmer by
training and electronics are a hobby I have picked up along the way.

Thanks,
Adam

Adam Bryant (age 0x23)
spam_OUTabryantTakeThisOuTspampeaktech.com (work)
.....adamdbKILLspamspam@spam@juno.com (home)
Parker, CO, USA
Robotics, RC Airplanes, anything using a PIC

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1999\05\17@131250 by engelec

picon face
Adam ,

I went through this several months ago I even tried separate
transistors didn't get good result I wouldn't bother making
it I found  good IC driver made by Cherry Semiconductor
part number is CS-298 it has dual H-Bridge drive very easy control .
can handle up to 2 amps per channel excellent part. you can get a sample from

Sager electronics http://www.sager.com


Andre Abelian




Adam Bryant wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1999\05\17@133407 by John Mitchell

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face
On Mon, 17 May 1999, Adam Bryant wrote:

> I recently picked up a number of 2N5192's surplus and would like to use
> them to construct an H Bridge motor controller (controlled from a PIC of
> course).  The motor I will be driving will draw around 1.5A.  My power
> supply is a 12v 5A battery.  The problem (if I read the datasheet
> correctly) is that the "Collector-Emitter Saturation Voltage" of the 5192
> is specified as Ic=1.5Adc, Ib=0.15Adc.  As I understand this, for my
> Collector-Emitter current to be the 1.5amps I need to drive the motor, I
> need to drive the Base with 150mA. Is this correct?  So my thought was to
> add another transistor between the PIC and the 2N5192's to amplify the
> signal from the 20mA the PIC can source to the 150mA needed for the
> 2N5192.  Seem reasonable?  Are there any other options for doing this
> using the 5192's?  I would hate to have to use 8 transisitors per motor
> H-bridge.

I'd strongly suggest ditching your 5192s and just buy a L298 or LMD18200
to handle your motor. The 298 will do 1A, 3A peak; the LMD is heftier.

This site has more info, theory, and a PCB:
       http://www.dprg.org/hbridge_theory.html

You can get a 298 surplus at BG Micro (http://www.bgmicro.com/) for $3.49
US.  Note: you'll need fast-blow diodes.  Or, a kit from HVW Technologies
is available for $25 CDN at
       http://www.hvwtech.com/robotics.htm#motor_drivers


But if you're desperate or really cheap: yes, as far as I know, you can
use a small transistor to switch the larger transistor: the pair forms a
relative of the Darlington amplifier, for which you can search for more
info.

I'm building a small 6-transistor H-bridge, and it's basically is a pain
in the ass.  But this is my first real-world project, so it's a Valuable
Learning Experience :)  I'm using a variation of this circuit:
       http://www.wizard.org/schem/motor.html



- j

1999\05\18@031207 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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> I recently picked up a number of 2N5192's surplus and would like to use
> them to construct an H Bridge motor controller (controlled from a PIC of
> course).  The motor I will be driving will draw around 1.5A.  My power
> supply is a 12v 5A battery.  The problem (if I read the datasheet
> correctly) is that the "Collector-Emitter Saturation Voltage" of the 5192
> is specified as Ic=1.5Adc, Ib=0.15Adc.  As I understand this, for my
> Collector-Emitter current to be the 1.5amps I need to drive the motor, I
> need to drive the Base with 150mA. Is this correct?
       <snip>

Not necesarily.  Those figures were just the condition under which Vce was
measured.  The transisitor may have enough gain to saturate at a lower base
current.  The Hfe (gain) figure that you'll find on the data sheet should
give you a reasonable idea.  Hmm...just found it...HFE minimum = 20.  1.5/20
gives a minimum base current of 75mA.  I guess they doubled it to make sure
:o)  Still too much for a PIC to drive directly.

Also, an H-Bridge would normally use 2 NPN and 2 PNP transistors configured
as common emiters.  You *could* use all NPN's with the upper pair working as
emiter followers but I wouldn't personally recomend it.  If you're set on
making a bridge instead of buying one ready made, then think about using
Darlington power transistors or MOSFETs, both of which could be driven
directly from a PIC pin.

Regards

Mike Rigby-Jones

1999\05\19@105649 by electme

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face
Ib = 1/10 Ic
is a good place to start from.
thats where i start
glen

John Mitchell wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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