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'Crystal Vs. Resonator?'
2000\05\05@172215 by Bennett, Matt

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Coulda sworn I've seen debates on this topic before, but I just searched the
faq and the the archives and couldn't find anything.

If a highly accurate clock source is not necessary, is there any reason not
to use a ceramic resonator instead of a crystal?  Resonators appear to be
cheaper, and you can get them with built in capacitors, which leads to less
expensive board assy. costs.  (One part to mount instead of 3).

If I do use a resonator, are there any special warnings about layout or
circuit topology, or can I just slap it in in place of a crystal (and set
the appropriate configuration flags).

Matt Bennett

2000\05\05@174228 by Andrew Warren

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Bennett, Matt <spam_OUTPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> If a highly accurate clock source is not necessary, is there any
> reason not to use a ceramic resonator instead of a crystal?

   Not unless you need a clock speed that's outside the range
   available from ceramic resonators.  If you're running at 4 MHz
   and don't need extremely good frequency accuracy, a resonator is
   an excellent choice.

> Resonators appear to be cheaper

   They are, at least at 4 MHz.

> If I do use a resonator, are there any special warnings about
> layout or circuit topology, or can I just slap it in in place of a
> crystal (and set the appropriate configuration flags).

   Just use it as you would use a crystal.  Capacitor values are
   different for resonators, but if you're using a 3-pin resonator
   with built-in caps, you don't need to worry about that.

   -Andy


=== Andrew Warren - .....fastfwdKILLspamspam@spam@ix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - San Diego, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

2000\05\05@181140 by Reginald Neale

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<x-flowed>>
>If I do use a resonator, are there any special warnings about layout or
>circuit topology, or can I just slap it in in place of a crystal (and set
>the appropriate configuration flags).
>

  Yep, pretty much. Check the Murata page, they'll tell you which
  resonator to use with which PIC and recommended config.

  Reg Neale

</x-flowed>

2000\05\06@011928 by Russell McMahon

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From: Bennett, Matt <Matt.BennettspamKILLspamANDREW.COM>


>Coulda sworn I've seen debates on this topic before, but I just searched
the
>faq and the the archives and couldn't find anything.


Should be there.
Has definitely benn covered before.

>If a highly accurate clock source is not necessary, is there any reason not
>to use a ceramic resonator instead of a crystal?  Resonators appear to be
>cheaper, and you can get them with built in capacitors, which leads to less
>expensive board assy. costs.  (One part to mount instead of 3).
>
>If I do use a resonator, are there any special warnings about layout or
>circuit topology, or can I just slap it in in place of a crystal (and set
>the appropriate configuration flags).


At 4 MHz using Murata resonators I have never had problems.
Resonators are  good for about 0.1% accuracy long term considering all error
sources (eg aging, initial error, temperature drift across normal
temperature range).
This is very easily good enough for asynchronous serial operation with 1
start 8 data 2 stop bits  which is about the worst case job for low
stability applications.  If you don't need even this accuracy then an RC
oscillator may suffice.

See Murata's web site for good details of their products.

   http://www.murata.com/develop/index.htm ???


RM

2000\05\06@133151 by Peter Anderson

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Aside from crical timing applications I always use a resonator at 4.0 MHz.  The are from ECS.  Part Number X902 from http://www.digikey.com.

However, many years ago, we fielded a Basic Stamp 2 using a similar 20.0 MHz resonator and to my embarrassment, many did not work.  A helpful buyer came to the rescue noting this particular resonator did not have sufficient drive.

Thus, I use crystals at freqs above 10.0 MHz.

Peter H. Anderson, .....phaKILLspamspam.....phanderson.com, http://www.phanderson.com
PICs, PIC Programmer, "PIC C Routines"

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