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'Chips in our body(ABC news)'
1998\09\23@173754 by Eduardo Rivera

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Have anyone read about this:

From ABC Sept. 3/98
____________________
"A professor in England recently became the first
                 person known to have implanted a microchip in his
                 body to communicate with outside machines. Find out
                 what this "cyborg man" has in mind during a live chat.



"In late August, cybernetics researcher Kevin
              Warwick gave a startling demonstration of the
              merger of man and machine by having a biochip
              implanted in his arm. When he walks through his
              office building, the lights turn on and a voice from
              a wall speaker tells him how much e-mail he has
              waiting."
"As I move about, the computer in the building can track
              me," Warwick, professor of cybernetics at the University of
              Reading. "Potentially, machines could be more intelligent than
              humans."

1998\09\23@182235 by andre

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I am sure after a few years the professor that has pic in
his hand is going to talk to his wife in assembly language.

like

           movf    bread,w        ; locate the bread
           movwf    to,me         ; pass it to me

just kidding.

Andre



Eduardo Rivera wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\09\23@182836 by Harrison Cooper

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now wait a minute!!! This has posibilties....hook into our body....and
send data streams to each other!!!

I've always wanted a serial port...actually, kept saying I wanted a
'cereal' port, perhaps a 'gerber' format for my kids.  That way I could
just download data and see whats wrong, and upload the proper data to
them.

This has me thinkin....hehe

{Quote hidden}

1998\09\23@185947 by Bob Blick

face
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>  "As I move about, the computer in the building can track
>                me," Warwick, professor of cybernetics at the University of
>                Reading. "Potentially, machines could be more intelligent than
>                humans."

Well, more intelligent than Prof. Warwick shouldn't be much of a
challenge. What an idiot.

Bob "I am not a number" Blick

1998\09\23@191047 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
At 03:48 PM 9/23/98 +0000, you wrote:
>>  "As I move about, the computer in the building can track
>>                me," Warwick, professor of cybernetics at the University of
>>                Reading. "Potentially, machines could be more intelligent
than
>>                humans."
>
>Well, more intelligent than Prof. Warwick shouldn't be much of a
>challenge. What an idiot.
>
>Bob "I am not a number" Blick
>


I, too, thought that the comment  "machines could be more intelligent than
humans" was very strange and totally unconnected with the rest of what was
being said. What does inteligence have to do with tracking ability and
interfacing ability?!

Sean


+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
shb7spamKILLspamcornell.edu  Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315 ICQ #: 3329174

1998\09\23@201314 by goflo

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Bob Blick wrote:
> What an idiot.

Hear, hear...

1998\09\23@202124 by Bob Cousins
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picon face
Bob Blick wrote:

>>  "As I move about, the computer in the building can track
>>                me," Warwick, professor of cybernetics at the University of
>>                Reading. "Potentially, machines could be more intelligent than
>>                humans."
>
>Well, more intelligent than Prof. Warwick shouldn't be much of a
>challenge. What an idiot.

Apparently Warwick has a chip in his shoulder; whereas you have one on your
shoulder ;-)

This happened a few weeks ago anyway, and I think the chip will now have been
removed. I'm surprised with all the people blowing things up noone else got a
semiconductor embedded in their body!

The quote about intelligence was probably added out of context by a hack
reporter, to add a bit of controversy. Hacks love that. Quite why having a chip
implanted is so different to wearing it on a wrist I've no idea. Being cynical,
it was all probably a stunt to attract students at a time of year when they are
finalising college choices.

Uh, my leg says it's time to go.
--
Bob Cousins, Software Engineer.
Home page at http://www.lintilla.demon.co.uk/

1998\09\23@230154 by Paul Penrose

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Big deal, millions of people have chips in their body that communicates
with external computers; they are called pacemakers! In addition, the
pacemaker provides a real biological aid to the implantee. There's quite a
bit computing power in a pacemaker or Implanted Defibulator, more than
many would suspect. So this guy has not done anything new - he's got a
long way to catch up as far as I'm concerned.

1998\09\23@235217 by Dan Larson

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On Wed, 23 Sep 1998 21:57:30 -0500, Paul Penrose wrote:

>Big deal, millions of people have chips in their body that communicates
>with external computers; they are called pacemakers! In addition, the
>pacemaker provides a real biological aid to the implantee. There's quite a
>bit computing power in a pacemaker or Implanted Defibulator, more than
>many would suspect. So this guy has not done anything new - he's got a
>long way to catch up as far as I'm concerned.
>


Not to mention, the ID chips that they have been implanting in
pets lately.  Whats the big deal with what this guy has done anyway?

Everone knows that a man by the name of Steve Austin was the first
person with Cybernetic implants! <G>.

1998\09\24@024411 by

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I saw this on National Tv a while back and has the same thoughts as the rest
of you guys.  Why?

The chip they showed looked identical to the tag that they use on domestic
pets, i.e. a small, cylindrical glass tube capable of being implanted under
the skin.  The clip showed the guy walking around the university and doors
opening and a loudspeaker saying good morning to him.  Basicaly the sort of
thing virtually everyone on this list could do given the transponder
hardware and interfacing details.

Like someone said, it was purely a stunt to attract new students.

Mike Rigby-Jones
.....mrjonesKILLspamspam.....nortel.co.uk

1998\09\24@030748 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
This week's EETimes has an article on a small active tag you can WEAR
that permits your location within a building/campus to be tracked in 3d.
It's a sort of short-range GPS...

BillW

1998\09\24@033739 by Samuel Borrell

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>>  "As I move about, the computer in the building can track
>>                me," Warwick, professor of cybernetics at the
University of
>>                Reading. "Potentially, machines could be more
intelligent than
>>                humans."
>
>Well, more intelligent than Prof. Warwick shouldn't be much of a
>challenge. What an idiot.
>
>Bob "I am not a number" Blick

I totaly agree with you bob.

Sam "I am not a number too"

1998\09\24@070350 by cousens

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I am really suprised that none of the contributors to the recent
" Electrolytic Capacitor fun [ot] " thread didn't have a
chip ( or at least an Electrolytic ) implanted in their body.

--
Peter Cousens
email: EraseMEcousensspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTher.forthnet.gr  phone: + 3081 380534
snailmail:  Folia, Agia Fotini, Karteros, Heraklion  Crete, Greece.

Is it true? that they have, on the new version of windows
managed to increase the MTBF from 95 to 98 minutes
(Thats why they called it 95)

1998\09\24@092542 by Dan Larson

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On Thu, 24 Sep 1998 00:05:25 PDT, William Chops Westfield wrote:

>This week's EETimes has an article on a small active tag you can WEAR
>that permits your location within a building/campus to be tracked in 3d.
>It's a sort of short-range GPS...
>
>BillW
>

Exactly!  Why plant this chip under the skin when it could just as easily
be *worn*.  Call me paranoid, but the idea of some government forcefully
implanting such devices in its citizens also comes to mind, and does *not*
make me feel comfortable about this.  Anonymity, to me, is more dear than
doors that automatically open for me, even if I forget my tag at home in
the morning and have to stop by the security office for a "loaner".

Now, if you were implanting chips that would help a parapalegic walk you
would get my attention....


Dan

1998\09\24@101734 by John A. Craft

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Why don't we implant baby's at birth, that would be great.  Maybe the new
processor from Sintel,  80666.
:)

Jc.

1998\09\24@121557 by eslight

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> "In late August, cybernetics researcher Kevin
>                Warwick gave a startling demonstration of the
>                merger of man and machine by having a biochip
>                implanted in his arm. When he walks through his
>                office building, the lights turn on and a voice from
>                a wall speaker tells him how much e-mail he has
>                waiting."

Great, it takes a PhD to miss the obvious... this is another proof :)

IDIOT!!, a watch-type device  could do the exact same frigging thing
*without* harming the body.

Geez... stupid things (not to mention USELESS) that people will do
to get media coverage.


>                Reading. "Potentially, machines could be more intelligent than
>                humans."

Well I don't doubt a PIC with 1K filled with $FF  is smarter
than him because that's a perfect example of a $00.

Man... he should implant a new brain while at it.


My $.02 :-)

1998\09\24@122242 by David W. Duley

picon face
In a message dated 9/23/98 3:28:30 PM Pacific Daylight Time, hcooperspamspam_OUTES.COM
writes:

<< now wait a minute!!! This has posibilties....hook into our body....and
send data streams to each other!!!

I've always wanted a serial port...actually, kept saying I wanted a
'cereal' port, perhaps a 'gerber' format for my kids.  That way I could
just download data and see whats wrong, and upload the proper data to
them.

This has me thinkin....hehe
 >>
How about a reset buton for the wife and a volume control for the kids

Dave Duley

1998\09\24@133532 by Dan Larson

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On Thu, 24 Sep 1998 12:21:02 EDT, David W. Duley wrote:

>In a message dated 9/23/98 3:28:30 PM Pacific Daylight Time, @spam@hcooperKILLspamspamES.COM
>writes:
>

[SNIP]

>
>How about a reset buton for the wife and a volume control for the kids
>

ROFL!

1998\09\24@150641 by Andy Kunz

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>How about a reset buton for the wife and a volume control for the kids

Anybody remember "The Stepford Wives?"  There's my vote <G>

Andy


==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\09\25@020841 by Dr. Imre Bartfai

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On Thu, 24 Sep 1998, David W. Duley wrote:

> In a message dated 9/23/98 3:28:30 PM Pacific Daylight Time, KILLspamhcooperKILLspamspamES.COM
> writes:
>
> << now wait a minute!!! This has posibilties....hook into our body....and
>  send data streams to each other!!!
>
>  I've always wanted a serial port...actually, kept saying I wanted a
>  'cereal' port, perhaps a 'gerber' format for my kids.  That way I could
>  just download data and see whats wrong, and upload the proper data to
>  them.
>
>  This has me thinkin....hehe
>   >>
> How about a reset buton for the wife and a volume control for the kids
>
> Dave Duley

You will be surprised. It is available, but called scopolamine, Largactil
and all this stuff. It is very easy to supply a whole city and so get
control over it. There are no limits.

Imre

1998\09\25@021422 by Dr. Imre Bartfai

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Hi,
a barcode does it cheaper.
This stuff all remembers me to the Apocalypse in the Bible: ("nobody may
sell or buy until he/she wears the name of the beast or the number of its
name. And this is a human number.") I apologize for the unexact
translation.
Exciting, huh?!

Imre


On Thu, 24 Sep 1998, John A. Craft wrote:

> Why don't we implant baby's at birth, that would be great.  Maybe the new
> processor from Sintel,  80666.
>  :)
>
> Jc.
>
>

1998\09\25@050754 by Russell McMahon

picon face
I have part of the front bumper of a Vauxhall Wyvern in my knee as a
memento  of my motorcycling (and being run into by cars) days (they
lost the x-rays when they were transferring me between hospitals and
missed some of the metal left there).
.
Alas, no embedded microchips, yet.
Our local city council inject them into dogs for id purposes.
.

-----Original Message-----
From: Peter Cousens <RemoveMEcousensTakeThisOuTspamher.forthnet.gr>

>I am really suprised that none of the contributors to the recent
>" Electrolytic Capacitor fun [ot] " thread didn't have a
>chip ( or at least an Electrolytic ) implanted in their body.

1998\09\25@064118 by Keith H

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Alien 1: "Fancy a game of hide the pellet?"
Alien 2: "Good idea, I'll get the probes!"

If people start implanting things ourselves,
some life forms are going to be as puzzled
as golfers finding multicoloured golf balls.

------------------------------------------------------
I'm astounded by people who want to know the Universe.
It's hard enough to find your way around Chinatown.
       Woody Allen
------------------------------------------------------

1998\09\25@194936 by Regulus Berdin

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Dr. Imre Bartfai wrote:
> This stuff all remembers me to the Apocalypse in the Bible: ("nobody may
> sell or buy until he/she wears the name of the beast or the number of its
> name. And this is a human number.") I apologize for the unexact
> translation.

A credit card (number)?!

Reggie

1998\09\26@001348 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
I've never understood the "I am not a number" camp, except on a very
visceral level.  After all, my number is designed to be more unique
than my name, for example...

BillW

1998\09\26@100203 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Sat, 26 Sep 1998, Regulus Berdin wrote:

> Dr. Imre Bartfai wrote:
> > This stuff all remembers me to the Apocalypse in the Bible: ("nobody may
> > sell or buy until he/she wears the name of the beast or the number of its
> > name. And this is a human number.") I apologize for the unexact
> > translation.
>
> A credit card (number)?!

It is possible that Imre got the title of the book wrong. The description
fits future e-commerce exactly unless a couple of miracles happen real
quick. Probably refers to US social security numbers replacing account
numbers, just to be sure of credit rating & history ;) It must have been a
product pamphlet from a firm or other...

Peter

1998\09\28@022815 by Dr. Imre Bartfai

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On Sat, 26 Sep 1998, Peter L. Peres wrote:

> On Sat, 26 Sep 1998, Regulus Berdin wrote:
>
> > Dr. Imre Bartfai wrote:
> > > This stuff all remembers me to the Apocalypse in the Bible: ("nobody may
> > > sell or buy until he/she wears the name of the beast or the number of its
> > > name. And this is a human number.") I apologize for the unexact
> > > translation.
> >
> > A credit card (number)?!
>
> It is possible that Imre got the title of the book wrong. The description
> fits future e-commerce exactly unless a couple of miracles happen real
> quick. Probably refers to US social security numbers replacing account
> numbers, just to be sure of credit rating & history ;) It must have been a
> product pamphlet from a firm or other...
>
> Peter
>
Strange humour, Peter. But not completely groundless ;(((

Imre

1998\09\28@094150 by Andy Kunz

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>It is possible that Imre got the title of the book wrong. The description
>fits future e-commerce exactly unless a couple of miracles happen real
>quick. Probably refers to US social security numbers replacing account
>numbers, just to be sure of credit rating & history ;) It must have been a
>product pamphlet from a firm or other...

Except that it's a world-wide system, rather Euro-centric it appears.

Andy


==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\09\28@094220 by Andy Kunz

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At 07:47 AM 9/26/98 +0800, you wrote:
>Dr. Imre Bartfai wrote:
>> This stuff all remembers me to the Apocalypse in the Bible: ("nobody may
>> sell or buy until he/she wears the name of the beast or the number of its
>> name. And this is a human number.") I apologize for the unexact
>> translation.

Actually, Doc, you did a pretty good job in the translation.  You should
have mentioned that this number is 666.

OK, guys, how do you represent 666 in Roman and Greek number systems?

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\09\28@101405 by goflo

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Andy Kunz wrote:
> OK, guys, how do you represent 666 in Roman and Greek number systems?

Would'nt hex be more appropriate? :)

Regards, Jack

1998\09\28@105507 by Matt Bonner

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William Chops Westfield wrote:
>
> I've never understood the "I am not a number" camp, except on a very
> visceral level.  After all, my number is designed to be more unique
> than my name, for example...
>
> BillW

I agree.  To take it further, the right combination of letters/numbers
as a postal code could uniquely identify us and do away with physical
snail mail addresses.  As far as I can see, this would *enhance*
privacy.

--Matt

1998\09\28@135003 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Mon, 28 Sep 1998, Andy Kunz wrote:

> Actually, Doc, you did a pretty good job in the translation.  You should
> have mentioned that this number is 666.
>
> OK, guys, how do you represent 666 in Roman and Greek number systems?

Bill Gates III, no ?

Peter

1998\09\28@162543 by Eduardo Rivera

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>> OK, guys, how do you represent 666 in Roman and Greek number systems?
>
>Bill Gates III, no ?

            I do know in Roman or Greek but in Decimal = 666
                                               Hexadecimal = 29A
                                               Octal = 1232

         ________  ________  ________
        /         /       / /       /
       /_____    /_______/ /_______/
      /         /  \      / \
     /________ /    \    /   \
     ICQ# 10909825   \_ /     \___________
     spamBeGoneeriveraspamBeGonespamumemphis.campus.mci.net

1998\09\28@171000 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
At 03:16 PM 9/28/98 -0500, you wrote:
>>> OK, guys, how do you represent 666 in Roman and Greek number systems?

Well, I'm not familiar with the Greek system, but in roman numerals it
is(IIRC):

DCLXVI

Sean


+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Save lives, please look at http://www.all.org
Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
TakeThisOuTshb7EraseMEspamspam_OUTcornell.edu  Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315 ICQ #: 3329174

1998\09\28@172318 by thomas

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face
> OK, guys, how do you represent 666 in Roman and Greek number systems?

>From the book of Revelation in Greek:

hexakosioi hexnkonta hex

the 'n' is an eta

Sorry, not sure how to get a greek font over the email.
The Greeks wrote their numbers.  I supposed it simplified writing
checks.

Thomas J Macauley, KD7BDW
RemoveMEthomasspamTakeThisOuTadvancedcontrol.com
(208) 362-5858

1998\09\28@175353 by tekhead

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face
Has anyone ever stopped to ask how the Borg got started?

Roy Souther               silicontao_royEraseMEspam.....technologist.com
LMAD Canada Inc      http://www.telusplanet.net\public\lmad

1998\09\28@194153 by Regulus Berdin

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Andy Kunz wrote:
> OK, guys, how do you represent 666 in Roman and Greek number systems?

Here is one interesting coincidence.

alphabeth position
    V
C -  3 X 6 =  18
O - 15 X 6 =  90
M - 13 X 6 =  78
P - 16 X 6 =  96
U - 21 X 6 = 126
T - 20 X 6 = 120
E -  5 X 6 =  30
R - 18 X 6 = 108
           ----
      SUM = 666


Reggie

1998\09\29@064935 by Caisson

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face
> Van: William Chops Westfield <EraseMEbillwspamCISCO.COM>
> Aan: RemoveMEPICLISTEraseMEspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Onderwerp: Re: Chips in our body(ABC news)
> Datum: zaterdag 26 september 1998 6:10
>
> I've never understood the "I am not a number" camp, except on a very
> visceral level.  After all, my number is designed to be more unique
> than my name, for example...
>
> BillW

A person is quite unique by name and place where he/she lives,  thoug this
could mean a lengthy description of the person (name, country, city,street,
house-number).  Numbers attached to persons are mostly used by
Data-processing organisations to keep the amount of data-storage to a
minimum.  While this is valid for those systems (all above items could be
changed while the links, provided by this unique person-number, stay valid
without any change. very handy if the data-base is spread over
more-than-one Data-base lists) those numbers are _not_ the people they
represent.

The biggest problem is not that numbers could identify a person, but that
those numbers are used to "rename" a person.  in other words : rob him of
his name.  Forcing him/her to be a non-unique entity (we've ALL got those
numbers) and be adressed as such.

No thanks.  Let those numbers stay where they belong, in the data-base's
(computer or otherwise).

By the way, how many of those "unique" numbers are used in the different
systems to identify you ?  It's like you would have (fully) different names
for any person you meet.  And although _they_ choose their "unique" number
_you_ are supposed to remember it ....

Greetz,
 Rudy Wieser

P.s.
As you can read, I'm not against using ID-numbers. They are needed. I'm
against being adressed by that number.

1998\09\29@092316 by Andy Kunz

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>             I do know in Roman or Greek but in Decimal = 666
>                                                Hexadecimal = 29A
>                                                Octal = 1232

Those are Arabic numerals.

Andy


==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\09\29@123036 by Ansel Sermersheim

flavicon
face
>>>>> "Andy" == Andy Kunz <RemoveMEmtdesignspam_OUTspamKILLspamFAST.NET> writes:

> At 07:47 AM 9/26/98 +0800, you wrote:
>> Dr. Imre Bartfai wrote:
>>> This stuff all remembers me to the Apocalypse in the Bible:
>>> ("nobody may sell or buy until he/she wears the name of the beast
>>> or the number of its name. And this is a human number.") I
>>> apologize for the unexact translation.

> Actually, Doc, you did a pretty good job in the translation.  You
> should have mentioned that this number is 666.

> OK, guys, how do you represent 666 in Roman and Greek number
> systems?

Dunno about roman or greek, but I've always preferred `-rw-rw-rw-'
myself.

*steps into groanproof box*

-Ansel
--
I used to be convinced that MicroSquish shipped crap because they simply
didn't give a flying fuck as long as the sheep kept buying their shit.
Now, I'm convinced that they really do ship the best products they are
capable of writing, and *that's* tragic.
  - John C. Randolph, about MS quality control.

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