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'Carbon Monoxide Detector'
1997\10\29@124931 by Steven M. Davidson

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It's that time of the year that Carbon Monoxide can become dangerous.
Ideal project for a PIC.  Problem, where can you get Carbon Monoxide
detectors?

Steve
spam_OUTsdavidsonTakeThisOuTspamits.bldrdoc.gov

1997\10\29@135051 by John Payson

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> It's that time of the year that Carbon Monoxide can become dangerous.
>  Ideal project for a PIC.  Problem, where can you get Carbon Monoxide
> detectors?

I don't know how the detection module itself works, but FYI the First Alert
brand CO detector with LED digital readout uses a PIC 16C57 (socketed).  It
also has an empty 8-pin socket (I'm not sure what that's for unless it maybe
can hold a 12C508 for use on a display-less model?)

1997\10\29@135924 by Jason Wolfson

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I did an air quality monitor (with a 16C622)
the sensor was from Figaro, not sure if they have a web site..
I think they have good CO sensor


Figaro USA Inc,
1000 Skokie Blvd. Suite 160
Wilmette, Illinois 60091

708-256-3546





>> It's that time of the year that Carbon Monoxide can become dangerous.
>>  Ideal project for a PIC.  Problem, where can you get Carbon Monoxide
>> detectors?
>
>I don't know how the detection module itself works, but FYI the First Alert
>brand CO detector with LED digital readout uses a PIC 16C57 (socketed).  It
>also has an empty 8-pin socket (I'm not sure what that's for unless it
maybe
>can hold a 12C508 for use on a display-less model?)
>

1997\10\29@205538 by Craig R. Autio

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At 10:45 AM 10/29/97 -0700, you wrote:
>It's that time of the year that Carbon Monoxide can become dangerous.
> Ideal project for a PIC.  Problem, where can you get Carbon Monoxide
>detectors?
>
>Steve
>.....sdavidsonKILLspamspam@spam@its.bldrdoc.gov
>
>
Figaro makes Carbon Monoxide detectors (the element).  This sensor is used
in many commercial detectors.  The rest of the circuit is analog and a
microcontroller.

Craig R. Autio
cautiospamKILLspamequinox.shaysnet.com
**********************************
*       Craig R. Autio           *
*                                *
*  .....cautioKILLspamspam.....equinox.shaysnet.com   *
**********************************

1997\10\30@102351 by Harrison Cooper

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I think I want to comment on this.

How would you reliably test this.  Manufacturers go through thousands of
hours of testing using various environments to be sure the product is
reliable and safe.  Would you trust your life and or family's life on a
"project'?  I bought one.  It was only $25 from the state health dept.,
and I hope to hell the thing never goes off.

Now, on the other hand......if you are playing with it to just
play....which is very valid, as being an engineer we often think, can I
design something that does this?  and do it, make it work, and be proud
of it.....I would say go for it!  Put it as a standby.....or as another
back up sensor.

Oh, and as the comment as that time of year..at least in the
states......its because now we close up our normal paths of ventilation
(windows) and fumes have a harder time escaping.  This gas is dangerous
all year round.  Just a few months ago....a family nearby was woken up
in the night by their sensor....the furnace had a clogged vent.  They
are alive today.


OK......no flames please.   This was just my opinion, and of course, do
what you wanna do.

1997\10\30@112628 by David W. Duley

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In a message dated 97-10-29 12:51:20 EST, you write:

<<
It's that time of the year that Carbon Monoxide can become dangerous.
 Ideal project for a PIC.  Problem, where can you get Carbon Monoxide
detectors?

Steve
EraseMEsdavidsonspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTits.bldrdoc.gov >>

Hello Steve,
I saw a Popular Electronics (Or was it the other one) article that did this
with those $5.00 disposable cards that are available at most hardware stores.
They have a chemically sensitive spot on them that turns color when exposed
to CO.  The article used a photo sensor and a light source to detect the
color change.  The only drawback is you have to replace the card once it has
been exposed.

Dave Duley

1997\10\30@131838 by Tim Kerby

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Hi
I don't know of a gas sensor that detects CO (the local university is
developing one at the moment) but the way most work is with an optical
sensor that senses the colour changes in a CO sensitive phial of crystals.
These crystals have to be replaced on a regular basis.


Tim

At 10:45 29/10/97 -0700, you wrote:
>It's that time of the year that Carbon Monoxide can become dangerous.
> Ideal project for a PIC.  Problem, where can you get Carbon Monoxide
>detectors?
>
>Steve
>sdavidsonspamspam_OUTits.bldrdoc.gov
>
>


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1997\10\30@143527 by John Payson

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> I don't know of a gas sensor that detects CO (the local university is
> developing one at the moment) but the way most work is with an optical
> sensor that senses the colour changes in a CO sensitive phial of crystals.
> These crystals have to be replaced on a regular basis.

My impression is that there are some CO detectors that can be used contin-
uously, but that those ones require far too much current to be operated
24/7 with batteries.  An approach using a catalyst-coated wire heater could
work very nicely, but the heater would have to be kept hot to make measure-
ments; if the heater is switched off, it will need to be powered on again
for a minute or so to re-stabilize.  When running off AC, this shouldn't be
a problem, but battery life--even using, e.g., 6 AA's, would probably be
under a month.

Battery-powered CO detectors do use the photoreactive chemicals, but they are
only good for a year or so.  To ensure that people don't use stale chemicals,
the battery is built into the same assembly as the chemicals; replacing the
battery requires replacing the chemicals.

1997\10\30@171625 by myke predko

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It was Electronics Now!

Check out the issues after it - there were a *lot* of disclaimers written to
tell users that this was not an approved product and Electronics Now! would
not be held liable if you suffocated while using it.

It was an interesting project, but if you're doing this for anything other
than experimentation buy one that has a UL/CSA stamp on it.

myke
{Quote hidden}

Check out "Programming and Customizing the PIC Microcontroller" at:

http://www.myke.com

1997\10\30@220114 by Alberto Smulders

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For an idea on the technologies involved in gas sensors (and other
(un)imaginable technologies), see the IBM US Patent Server:

   http://patent.womplex.ibm.com/

The best source of information I've found on the web.........

Albert A.Smulders
InSAD - Encarnacion, Paraguay
RemoveMEinsadTakeThisOuTspamitacom.com.py

1997\10\31@045549 by Pasi T Mustalahti

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On Thu, 30 Oct 1997, Harrison Cooper wrote:
> I think I want to comment on this.
>.. reliable and safe.  Would you trust your life and or family's life on
> a "project'?  I bought one.  It was only $25 from the state health
> dept.,and I hope to hell the thing never goes off.
PTM: Here in Finland a gas alarm costs about 100$. inside the box there is
one Figaro, 7805 regulator, a couple of resistors transistor and a buzzer.
An alcometer costs about 30$ and has about 10x components inside.
And the best part of this is that there is the same Figaro type.
You can not get those Figaros as discrete components.

Warning: There is warious Figaros. As I recall the TGS822 was for
flammable gases as natural gas and alcohol and this TGS800 that I also
have on my desk is for something else :)

I have made some alarms for myself that work with natural gas.
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1997\10\31@050417 by Pasi T Mustalahti

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On Wed, 29 Oct 1997, Tim Kerby wrote:

> Hi
> I don't know of a gas sensor that detects CO (the local university is
> developing one at the moment) but the way most work is with an optical
> sensor that senses the colour changes in a CO sensitive phial of crystals.
> These crystals have to be replaced on a regular basis.
>
PTM: What are these Lambada -sensors in the cars doing ?
Could we use a good old spectrometer to measure CO ?
Or a linear accelerator ?  That might be a nice add to a PIC :)
Once upon a time I had a VIC20 with 128 kB RAM 48 kB ROM, Floppy and a
2-chrystal-Roentgen-spectrometer.
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> Email: RemoveMEtim.kerbyspamTakeThisOuTukonline.co.uk
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>

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