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'Car LED lighting system'
1999\07\27@130823 by paulb

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What Dmitry refers to as an "eye" and others as a "lamp", is
technically called an "aspect", particularly in railway use (as Anniepoo
would know!).  Thus you have "single-aspect" or "three aspect" displays.

 Speaking at least for this country, single-aspect railway displays
are an oddity that has been around quite a while, originally in the form
of the lamp on a semaphore with a moving colour filter.  Colour vision
*is* a prerequisite for train drivers.

 (Aside:  How many know what alternate uses the yellow aspect has in
railway signals?  It certainly doesn't mean the same as in traffic
lights!)

Andy Kunz wrote:

> I went for my annual eye exam last week, and he found that my ability
> to see contrast against green (black/green was very bad) in my right
> eye was much poorer in the left eye.  He sees it as directly related
> to the amount of computer use I've been getting.

 I find that *extremely* implausible. Look at:
www.hon.ch/Library/Theme/VisionFaq/section7.html
(or should I quote "Stop it, or you'll go blind!" :-)
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\27@131443 by paulb

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Harold Hallikainen wrote:

> Since there is no current limit resistor, the circuit should be pretty
> efficient.  You could put a bunch of LEDs in series across a single
> inductor.  Anyone tried anything like this?

 Tried, no.  The concept came up in previous "most LED efficiency from
your battery-powered PIC; no resistor" discussion, didn't it?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\27@134124 by Andy Kunz

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>> I went for my annual eye exam last week, and he found that my ability
>> to see contrast against green (black/green was very bad) in my right
>> eye was much poorer in the left eye.  He sees it as directly related
>> to the amount of computer use I've been getting.
>
>  I find that *extremely* implausible. Look at:
>www.hon.ch/Library/Theme/VisionFaq/section7.html
>(or should I quote "Stop it, or you'll go blind!" :-)

I beg to differ.  Using the link you just provided:

 7.3 Classification of Acquired Colour Vision Defects

 Acquired colour vision problems can be the result of lesions of the macula,
 optic nerve, or visual cortex. Also changes in the optical media, eg
cataract
 changes, or toxic effects of chemicals can alter colour perception.

 Acquired colour vision defects are generally asymmetrical in the two eyes,
 eg affecting red-green as well as yellow-blue, while also there may be
 other defects of visual function ( visual field defects).

It's obvious that the asymmetry I mentioned is typical.

Since I regularly work with all types of nasty chemicals, that could be a
contributing factor.

Screen brightness has been proven as a problem in certain types of retinal
dysfunction.

His assumption that 12+ house of bright video per day, 18" from my nose, is
the _primary_ cause is, yes, up to debate.  The fact that I can't see
green/black contrast as well with my right eye as with my left, though, is
determined.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz               Life is what we do to prepare for Eternity
------------------------------------------------------------------
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==================================================================

1999\07\27@134919 by paulb

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Andy Kunz wrote:

> Screen brightness has been proven as a problem in certain types of
> retinal dysfunction.

 OK, better wear your sunglasses then.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\27@135534 by Adam Davis

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Which is the reason many computer facilities have dimmable lighting around the
computer user's desks, and lamps at each desk.  Dim the overhead lights, and you
can see the computer screen better at a lower intensity.  It's much like looking
at a 60W bulb diffused over 2 square feet.  Not a good thing for long periods of
time.

-Adam

"Paul B. Webster VK2BZC" wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1999\07\27@184200 by Dennis Plunkett

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At 03:07 28/07/99 +1000, you wrote:
>What Dmitry refers to as an "eye" and others as a "lamp", is
>technically called an "aspect", particularly in railway use (as Anniepoo
>would know!).  Thus you have "single-aspect" or "three aspect" displays.
>
>  Speaking at least for this country, single-aspect railway displays
>are an oddity that has been around quite a while, originally in the form
>of the lamp on a semaphore with a moving colour filter.  Colour vision
>*is* a prerequisite for train drivers.
>
>  (Aside:  How many know what alternate uses the yellow aspect has in
>railway signals?  It certainly doesn't mean the same as in traffic
>lights!)
>


Yep,
In Australia it means that the next "Section" can be entered but at a
reduced maximum speed, if I recall this is 15MPH

Dennis

1999\07\27@184817 by paulb

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Dennis Plunkett wrote:

> In Australia it means that the next "Section" can be entered but at a
> reduced maximum speed, if I recall this is 15MPH

 OK, now 1} What is the *other* meaning, and 2} Some sets have six
aspects, each red-yellow-green.  What gives?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\07\27@185819 by Dennis Plunkett

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At 08:47 28/07/99 +1000, you wrote:
>Dennis Plunkett wrote:
>
>> In Australia it means that the next "Section" can be entered but at a
>> reduced maximum speed, if I recall this is 15MPH
>
>  OK, now 1} What is the *other* meaning, and 2} Some sets have six
>aspects, each red-yellow-green.  What gives?
>--
>  Cheers,
>        Paul B.
>
>


OK so are you talking about two way signaling? Or are you talking about
switch points?

Dennis

1999\07\27@233045 by Anne Ogborn

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Interpreting railway signalling is actually quite complex, much of that complexi
ty
questionable.
Each RR's signal aspects are different (and, incidentally, the RYG traffic
light kind are arranged red bottom green top, just to confuse any
engineers who might happpen to also drive a car).

The Norfolk Southern's table showing how to interpret their signal
aspects has 62 different aspects (to compare, one for cars would show
5 - r,y,g,flash r, flash y)
And this isn't particularly worst case.

It's the usual case of 'the first design'
picking up the cruft from the invention and refinement
process.


--
Anniepoo
Need loco motors?
http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/motors.html

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