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'beginner'
1996\12\29@190432 by Sem-Jacobsen

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Where can I get beginners info. I wnat to learn more about how to program
the PIC e.g. how to start the program. -I've got all the software and
hardware but I'm new to programming. How do I start.

Stein Sem-Jacobsen


'beginner'
1997\10\28@182830 by Dennison
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Hello,
I  am a begginner with PIC and microcontrollers. I wanted to start simple
and easy with the basic stamp 1, the Rev. D edition (it's cheaper) Money is
a big issue.I easly have $40 american. For which I can buy one Stamp Rev. D
(or the couple other copy's) However I would have to spend $80 for a
beginners kit. Now, I can easilly make the programming cable (as long as
it's just wires right? not fancy circuitry in the cable box) I know that
all the extra info provided with the kit can easilly be downloaded. So what
I wanted to know, was

1.) do you have a list of what I need to download, to compensate for the
kit.
2.) do you have something that describes the cable schematics so I can make
my own?
3.) anything else that I might have to worry about? keep in mind?

I'm sorry to bother you but $80 dollars is signifigantly more than
pleasent, easpecially when all the documentation is downloadable for free
and the only other thing is the programing cable, and the stamp itself is
$34.00. With the money I save I could buy TWO stamps or a fancy serial LCD
(neato!)
Thanks for your time. \

Dennison

1997\10\29@152550 by KcW

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OK, goto to the parallaxinc ftp site and donwload the file STAMP.ZIP this
is the stamp compiler.
Also download the file CABLES.TXT, this is the cable spec. Also download
the STAMP1 manual. This is the entire kit. Let me know if you have any
problems.
KcW


'Beginner'
1998\01\21@005242 by Sebastian Garcia
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part 0 1384 bytes
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Hello to all, its my first message.

I m a beginner in PIC devices (and microcontrollers in general, too),  and I need help to understand some things:

1) Which is the difference in using language directives of MPASM  (like conditional assembly : if, while loops; data directives; macro directives; etc.) in place of portion code that can be made with the instructions of the set ?. Is any efficience difference ?

2) In case of using the language directives, in Eg: wait macro; How much time takes each languaje directive? (In clock cycles, in order to calculate the total time of retard of the macro).

3)Which are all the data types availables?. I think they are: integer (hexa,bin,dec,octal) , char. But Im not sure. (Are the data type 'vector' included ?;  I ve read a publication that works with 'vectors', but cant understand it).  

4) Which is the way to compile code to create macro libraries, and then refer to a librarie in the code of a program who use macros of the librarie ?.

5) Which is the net effect of the ORG directive ? .

Thank You, please excuse my bad english language, and have nice day.

Sebastian Garcia.
sgarcia@fi.uba.ar
Buenos Aires.
Republica Argentina.
 


'Beginner'
1998\11\15@202001 by Dale Wescombe
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Hi all,
I'm a FAE in Melbourne Australia and I've had an inquiry from a little old
man who wants a book to help him program Pics. I'm aware there are a few
good books to help with this but are there any that help some one who has
never programmed anything before?????
Even the concept of a flow chart is beyond his experience.
Can anyone help me here with a suggestion?????
Thanks
Dale

1998\11\15@234145 by Eduardo R.

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I had not even heard about this book before but....
                    Read this:

PIC: Your Personal Introductory Course

"Is a beginners guide for the PIC microcontroller ,published by
Butterworth-Heinnemman and released on May 4/98. Packed with examples it
takes the NOVICE through step by step exploring all the complex aspects  of
the device.
Also useful for experienced  users it has appendices full of quick reference
information , as well of plenty of projects PCBs (may be ordered )"

http://members.aol.com/LearnPIC/PIC.html
__________________

Beginners Guide to the Microchip PIC - Rev 3.0

Comprehensive introduction to the PIC, how it works and how to use it. The
book follows  a basic flowchart used in production development....

 http://www.bluebird-electronics.co.uk/books.html

Has someone had experience with those books ? Any Comments are welcome.

At 12:23 PM 11/16/98 +1000, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\11\16@074958 by cousens

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part 0 518 bytes
I would suggest he downloads the Stamp 1 manual from parallaxinc.com.

If after reading it, if he decides to take this road, his options are
to buy the preprogramed stamp's (16c54) or a compiler like PBC and
program the PIC's of his choice

Peter Cousens
email: spam_OUTcousensTakeThisOuTspamher.forthnet.gr  phone: + 3081 380534
snailmail:  Folia, Agia Fotini, Karteros, Heraklion  Crete, Greece.

We cannot blame God for creating a World with so many problems,
He had just upgraded from win3.11 to win95.
No wonder Eve recommended Apple.

1998\11\16@185806 by Mark

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> I'm a FAE in Melbourne Australia and I've had an inquiry from a little old
> man who wants a book to help him program Pics. I'm aware there are a few
> good books to help with this but are there any that help some one who has
> never programmed anything before?????
> Even the concept of a flow chart is beyond his experience.
> Can anyone help me here with a suggestion?????

I'd suggest that he start with a BASIC Stamp. The manual is
excellent, there are plenty of examples available and lots of
support. BASIC is certainly easier to learn than assembler for
someone who has *no* experience with a CPU or computer
concepts. Once comfortable with that, then I'd start him off on
Easy PIC'n and a good, simple programmer like the EPIC Plus.


Mark Hillier
President, HVW Technologies
.....MarkKILLspamspam@spam@HVWTech.com
Tel:(403)730-8603 Fax:(403)730-8903
Visit our web site: http://www.hvwtech.com


'Beginner'
1999\03\22@132147 by bmohnsen
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As a beginner which 8-bit microcontroller do you suggest I start with?

Bonnie

1999\03\22@132610 by Dave VanHorn

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>As a beginner which 8-bit microcontroller do you suggest I start
with?
>
>Bonnie

In pics, the easiest to work with is the F84, which can be programmed
with a minimum of expense and equipment.

Myself, I use Atmel AVR8515s, and their $50 development kit.

1999\03\22@133404 by Dave Johnson

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>As a beginner which 8-bit microcontroller do you suggest I start with?
Personally, I'm a big fan of the 16F84 or other flash/EE parts for
starting out and/or experimenting, since you don't have to mess with UV
erasers and the like, and it's much faster turnaround for fixing
bugs/trying new stuff.

Dave Johnson

1999\03\22@141354 by Nick Taylor

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Bonnie Mohnsen wrote:
> As a beginner which 8-bit microcontroller do you suggest I start with?
> Bonnie

Bonnie - -
Deciding where to begin and how to proceed is dependent upon your
starting point.  Do you have any programming experience: in BASIC?
in C?  in assembler?  Do you have any electronics experience: Ohm's
Law?  digital circuits?  analog circuits?

If you have little or no experience, then the BASIC Stamp is a good
starting point.  Here are a couple of links:
   http://www.phanderson.com/stamp/
   http://www.parallaxinc.com/home.htm
I recommend Prof. Anderson's BS2 Starter Kit and Scott Edwards'
book, "Programming & Customizing the BASIC Stamp Computer".

If you have more experience, then a PIC would be a good choice.  The
16F84 is a good starter.
http://www.phanderson.com/PIC/
http://www.microchip.com/
I recommend David Benson's books, "Easy PIC'n" and "PIC'n up the
Pace" if you are short on experience, else if you have more experience
then I recommend Myke Predko's "Programming & Customizing the PIC
Microcontroller" and David Benson's "PIC'n Techniques, PIC
Microcontroller Applications Guide".

If you have a lot of experience, then the 68HC11 might be a good place
to start.
fleming0.flemingc.on.ca/~pspasov/mcu/mcu.htm
http://www.hooked.net/~jfong/public/
www.rdrop.com/~marvin/botboard/botboard.htm
el.http://www.media.mit.edu/projects/handy-board/
Peter Spasov's "Microcontroller Technology" is good and Joseph
Greenfield's "The 68HC11 Microcontroller" is very good.  The Motorola
manuals (free) are indispensable.

Good luck, and enjoy,
- - - Nick - - -

1999\03\22@153352 by chuck

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If you start with the Stamps you can easily switch to the
PICs using the PicBasic Compiler. Or just start with PicBasic.
I also have beginners kit for the 16F84. Check it out at:
http://www.elproducts.com



---Nick Taylor <ntaylorspamKILLspamINAME.COM> wrote:
>
> Bonnie Mohnsen wrote:
> > As a beginner which 8-bit microcontroller do you suggest I start
with?
{Quote hidden}

==
Chuck Hellebuyck
Electronic Products
.....chuckKILLspamspam.....elproducts.com
*****Program PICs in BASIC Special!*********
Complete 16F84 package for only $115.95
Includes: Compiler, EPIC Programmer, 16F84 PIC, Cable & Batteries
http://www.elproducts.com
_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com

1999\03\22@153811 by w. v. ooijen / f. hanneman

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> Bonnie Mohnsen wrote:
> > As a beginner which 8-bit microcontroller do you suggest I start with?
> > Bonnie

> If you have more experience, then a PIC would be a good choice.  The
> 16F84 is a good starter.
> http://www.phanderson.com/PIC/
> http://www.microchip.com/
> I recommend David Benson's books, "Easy PIC'n" and "PIC'n up the
> Pace" if you are short on experience, else if you have more experience
> then I recommend Myke Predko's "Programming & Customizing the PIC
> Microcontroller" and David Benson's "PIC'n Techniques, PIC
> Microcontroller Applications Guide".

To add one more option: consider one of the free 16f84 languages, for
instance my JAL compiler. The documentation includes a few examples
which can get you started. I also have a real beginners course but that
is all in Dutch....

Wouter.

http://www.xs4all.nl/~wf/wouter/pic/jal

1999\03\22@191442 by Ron Dickinson

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In message <EraseME36F61A56.AF851D95spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTearthlink.net>, Bonnie Mohnsen
<bmohnsenspamspam_OUTEARTHLINK.NET> writes
>As a beginner which 8-bit microcontroller do you suggest I start with?
>
PIC's are great.....

As to which one, cost is important as well as complexity.

If you were earning a living from this I would suggest you first have a
problem, then find a chip to solve it. I had previous experience with
OLD stuff but needed up to 10 inputs, 14 outputs and at least 2 A/D
inputs for machine control with minimum board count.  I went for 16C74
first.

The real world is the best place to learn.  Otherwise it becomes
'assume this or that - or it does not matter, I will change the spec'

Failing a real problem, go for the cheapest chips and programming system
but try to keep to your original specification.

Keep pedalling



--
Ron Dickinson

                 Compusolve Business Systems
22 Crown Street, Clowne, Chesterfield, Derbyshire S43 4DN, England
                 Tel & Fax : 01246 - 570281

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