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'BASIC STAMPS?'
1999\11\04@051029 by Darren King

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How do they work?  I was looking over a design on Circuit Celler online.
The circuit was @
http://www.chipcenter.com/circuitcellar/october99/c109tp1.htm

They used a PIC16C57.  The included a serial link to program it...  Its not
a basic stamp is it?  Its all there to be built.  I can only assume the chip
is running some FIRMWARE for the basic stamp and then gets the program
through the serial port and then runs it.  I'm really interested in this
firmware can anybody tell me where to find it?  Or if I'm even on the right
track...

Someone please explain cause the article assumed that I had loaded the chip
with the firmware already I guess cause it just said it would work.

Darren King

1999\11\04@063257 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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part 0 3331 bytes
<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">I suspect you will have to order a pre-programmed 16C57 from the guy.&nbsp; A lot of micro based projects in Elector are like that.&nbsp; You don't get any source code, just a programmed chip.&nbsp; I could be wrong though...</FONT></P>

<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Regards</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Mike Rigby-Jones</FONT>
</P>
<UL>
<P><FONT SIZE=1 FACE="Arial">{Original Message removed}

1999\11\04@074936 by paulb

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> Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:

> I suspect you will have to order a pre-programmed 16C57 from the guy.

 The wording of the article suggests that the program and indeed the
16C57 are in Stamp 2 code.  There are clones available which copy the
BS2, or you could use an actual BS2.  The BS1 was always available as
the coded interpreter chip by itself, I'm not sure how this applies to
the BS2.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\11\04@182251 by Mike M

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You have no idea how much time i put into learning the workings of the basic sta
mp.  I still strongly feel that anyone that really knows programming as well as
electronics can pump out 10 of these for the price of one Parallax basic stamp..
.anyway the basic idea is the user write their code which is then downloaded to
the onboard EEPROM 24lC32?..from there the pic chip calls parts of the user cod
e (wich is now turned into simple opcodes that triger a "goto" within the prepro
grammed PIC code) and thats about the basics of it.  On board voltage regulators
and what not...

MiKE

On Thu, 4 Nov 1999 05:18:20 -0800 Darren King <spam_OUTdarren.kingTakeThisOuTspamSYMPATICO.CA> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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1999\11\04@214750 by John Mullan

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I like the idea of rolling my own "basic stamp". I've been meaning to give
STI-64 a try.  But I would like to see it use external SEEPROM.

Has anyone modified the code to do this yet??

John Mullan

{Original Message removed}

1999\11\04@221054 by Don McKenzie

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John Mullan wrote:
>
> I like the idea of rolling my own "basic stamp". I've been meaning to give
> STI-64 a try.  But I would like to see it use external SEEPROM.
>
> Has anyone modified the code to do this yet??

It will be done some time in the future along with a few other
enhancements, however in the meantime perhaps you would like to look at:
http://www.dontronics.com/tiny51.html
as an alternative.

Again this is a future product, but this one I would imagine will be
available Jan-00 or before. Should that be "2000". I guess I better
start using four digits before my keyboard falls out of the sky, or I
fall off my rocking chair. :-)

Don McKenzie  .....donKILLspamspam@spam@dontronics.com http://www.dontronics.com

Don's Download Dungeon:   http://www.dontronics.com/download.html
World's Largest Range of Atmel and PICmicro Hardware and Software

1999\11\04@224911 by John Mullan

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Well Don this sounds promising.  I may get around to trying it.  However,
at the moment I have a 4 dozen 16C84 chips that I would like to put to good
use and was hoping for source that works in it (utilizing the serial EEPROM
of course).

I'll keep my eyes open for the updated STI-64 though.

Reguards,

John Mullan


{Original Message removed}

1999\11\05@004226 by Don McKenzie

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John Mullan wrote:
>
> Well Don this sounds promising.  I may get around to trying it.  However,
> at the moment I have a 4 dozen 16C84 chips that I would like to put to good
> use and was hoping for source that works in it (utilizing the serial EEPROM
> of course).
>
> I'll keep my eyes open for the updated STI-64 though.

OK, there is also:
http://www.dontronics.com/picbasic.html
and
http://www.dontronics.com/pbpro.html
that don't use an EEPROM at all, and do the same thing and more, but at
a price of course.

Don McKenzie  donspamKILLspamdontronics.com http://www.dontronics.com

Don's Download Dungeon:   http://www.dontronics.com/download.html
World's Largest Range of Atmel and PICmicro Hardware and Software

1999\11\06@173110 by Darren King

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So would basic stamps be more useful to people who don't know how to program
in the assembly or are the just more convient cause they have the on board
power regulator and what not?  what is STI-64.  Some roll you own PIC Code?

Darren King


----- Original Message -----
From: John Mullan <.....jmullanKILLspamspam.....CGOCABLE.NET>
To: <EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Thursday, November 04, 1999 7:47 PM
Subject: Re: BASIC STAMPS?


> Well Don this sounds promising.  I may get around to trying it.  However,
> at the moment I have a 4 dozen 16C84 chips that I would like to put to
good
> use and was hoping for source that works in it (utilizing the serial
EEPROM
> of course).
>
> I'll keep my eyes open for the updated STI-64 though.
>
> Reguards,
>
> John Mullan
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

1999\11\06@183615 by Mike M

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actually as much as im against the basic stamp and the whole mark up your produc
t 95% coorporate world...i would have to say the answer is YES.  their language
is real simple, the entire device is a nice small size with basically all onboar
d hardware.  However i just rather take my time and learn the PIC instruction se
t (which isnt that hard to get goin) and prog chips at around $4.00 a peice inst
ead of a $70 stamp (or however much they are)

mIkE

On Sat, 6 Nov 1999 17:39:13 -0800 Darren King <darren.kingspamspam_OUTSYMPATICO.CA> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> {Original Message removed}

1999\11\06@184654 by Nick Taylor

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Darren,

The BASIC Stamp is very useful for the quick project where you only
need to use it for a short while and for prototyping a new idea.  Quick
and easy to program with no programmer of special board required.  The
BX-24 is a pin compatible replacement for the BS-2 with much more power.
The BS-2 uses a subset of BASIC and the BX-24 a subset of Visual Basic.
For BS-2 and BX-24 info see Prof. Anderson's site at:
   http://www.phanderson.com/stamp/
   http://www.phanderson.com/basicx/

Good luck and have fun,
- Nick -

Darren King wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> > {Original Message removed}

1999\11\06@212918 by William Chops Westfield

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> So would basic stamps be more useful to people who don't know how to
> program in the assembly or are the just more convient cause they have the
> on board power regulator and what not?

Yes.

The stamp language is easier to program in than assembly.  The stamp
hardware is ready-to-go - just connect wires to the appropriate I/O signals.
The stamp programming environment is simpler than OTP or FLASH based
controller chips - it plugs directly into your PC, no "programmer" required.
It's pretty great for "quick", but not so hot for "cheap." (it's also not
very good for "fast" WRT processor speed.) On the bright side, if you DO
design a project around a stamp, you can get cheaper versions (ie chip only
rather than the whole PCB) and design the HW to go with it "later."  In that
case, you'll only be 3 times or so as expensive as a bare PIC (Maybe - I
recall an ~$9 price for preprogrammed basic stamp I PIC chip in moderate
quantities.)

BillW

1999\11\06@213137 by William Chops Westfield

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By the way, does anyone have experience with the "basic tiger" systems from
Wilke technology?  The specs are impressive for the price, but I don't hear
nearly as much about them as I would expect to...

Thanks
Bill W

1999\11\06@215258 by Jason Muhammad

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I bought a Pic Proto board (but you can go to Radio Shack and buy a PCB
board for $1.19) and put a socket for a 16F84, crystal, caps, regulator
and reset button and Presto! you almost have a Basic Stamp :) A
suggestion is to get some index cards and write down basic routines.
For example, to make a pin high/low, to check if one file is
greater/less/equal than another file.  You can make macros that can
duplicate Basic Stamp instructions.

But I do use the BasicStampII in some of my development work.  For
example, I used a 12CE674-04/JW which is a windowed part. MPLAB
simulation does not cover the 8-bit A/D register (ADRES).  So I used a
BSII, an external 8-bit A/D, and constructed a BSII-A/D harness
terminated with an 8-pin header to fit into my project.  I wrote the
code in PBASIC and used BSII's most valuable feature: the DEBUG
Terminal.  I could display the A/D register, pin I/0, on the monitor, to
prove out both my circuits hardware and the Program Algorithm.  With the
BSII, I discovered a harware issue using the DEBUG terminal.  The BSII
language and DEBUG is faster to develop than PIC, albeit more limited.
You can change code and reload in just a few seconds.  I then just
bounced the PBASIC code routine by routine into PIC assembly.

I just agree with Mike that PIC is not so hard to learn, plus it offers
a lot more features like A/D, more memory for program and data.  You can
always add a DTMF chip if you like.  The thing I hate most about PIC is
Bank switching.  But at $3-4 dollars per chip versus $34.00, I will deal
with the Bank switching.  Expecially if you keep the suggested Cheat
Sheet nearby...

Mike M wrote:
>
> actually as much as im against the basic stamp and the whole mark up your prod
uct 95% coorporate world...i would have to say the answer is YES.  their languag
e is real simple, the entire device is a nice small size with basically all onbo
ard hardware.  However i just rather take my time and learn the PIC instruction
set (which isnt that hard to get goin) and prog chips at around $4.00 a peice in
stead of a $70 stamp (or however much they are)
{Quote hidden}

> >> {Original Message removed}

1999\11\06@222155 by Nick Taylor

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Jason,

I suggest you take a look at using NetMedia's BX-24 for your development
work in place of the BS-2.  It has 32K of program memory (without bank
switching), 400 bytes of RAM, multi-tasking, 8 10-bit A/D converters,
floating point math, an on board real time clock/calendar, SPI and
Dallas
1-wire and X-10 and std. serial communications ... plus three additional
I/O pins and two LEDs on board.  The SPI com doesn't use any of the std.
pins so there are 19 I/O pins plus SPI.  It's pin compatible with the
BS-2, doesn't require a special programming board, and the software is
available at the NetMedia site ... and the price is $10 less than that
of the BS-2.  I just pulled the BS-2 out of its breadboard and plugged
in the BX-24, installed the software and was ready to go!  The "chip"
has only been available for a couple of weeks, but so far I'm really
impressed.  If you send in your old BS-2 plus $20, they'll send you a
BX-24 ... can't beat that!   http://www.basicx.com/

- Nick -

Jason Muhammad wrote:
{Quote hidden}

oduct 95% coorporate world...i would have to say the answer is YES.  their langu
age is real simple, the entire device is a nice small size with basically all on
board hardware.  However i just rather take my time and learn the PIC instructio
n set (which isnt that hard to get goin) and prog chips at around $4.00 a peice
instead of a $70 stamp (or however much they are)
> >
> > mIkE
> >
> > On Sat, 6 Nov 1999 17:39:13 -0800 Darren King <EraseMEdarren.kingspamSYMPATICO.CA> wro
te:
{Quote hidden}

> > >> {Original Message removed}

1999\11\07@054922 by Octavio Nogueira

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> By the way, does anyone have experience with the "basic tiger" systems
from
> Wilke technology?  The specs are impressive for the price, but I don't
hear
> nearly as much about them as I would expect to...
>
> Thanks
> Bill W

Yes, I have used it for a long time and they are GREAT.
They are not as fast as a PIC but they can do multitasking,
have plenty of memory (up to 2MB) the they are very EASY
to program.
No programmer needed, just connect to PC.
They are more SBC then a bare processor

Friendly Regards

Octavio Nogueira
===================================================
RemoveMEnogueiraTakeThisOuTspamspampropic2.com                  ICQ# 19841898
ProPic tools - low cost PIC programmer and emulator
http://www.propic2.com
===================================================
-----Mensagem Original-----
De: William Chops Westfield <EraseMEbillwspamspamspamBeGoneCISCO.COM>
Para: <RemoveMEPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Enviada em: Domingo, Novembro 07, 1999 12:29
Assunto: Re: BASIC STAMPS?

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