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'Antwort: Re: [PIC]: Should I use a STAMP?'
2003\02\28@050845 by Martin.Buehler

picon face
why don't you use a compiler and go further with your pics?
as far as i know, the stamps are interpreter based, and are therefore
extremely slow.
tino





William Chops Westfield <spam_OUTbillwTakeThisOuTspamCISCO.COM>
Gesendet von: pic microcontroller discussion list <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
28.02.03 11:00
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       Thema:  Re: [PIC]: Should I use a STAMP?


   Lately, I've seen an "uprise" of Basic Stamp users. This really has me
   intrigued. My question is: If I've started off the "hard way" using
   ASM and custom peripherals/circuits/etc., is it really worth looking
   into the Basic Stamp at all?

Sure, it's worth looking at.  IMO, the stamp is more interesting from the
perspective of the language being well adapted to a certain subset of
embedded applications than for having brilliant hardware, but I think the
stamp development environment is likely to be amazingly fast, even compare
to flash "bare" microcontrollers (and when the stamp came out, well before
flash controllers were available, it was a real innovation!)

I believe that there's a "fractional stamp" implementation in an 16F84
out there as freeware someplace; uses the internal eeprom instead of
external code, with the accompanying limitations on program size.

BillW

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2003\02\28@104724 by michael brown

picon face
Martin.Buehler@KEYMILE.COM wrote:
> why don't you use a compiler and go further with your pics?
> as far as i know, the stamps are interpreter based, and are therefore
> extremely slow.
> tino

IIRC, the SX version of the stamp claims 10,000 lines per second
execution speed.  Not too shabby for an interpreted language.

michael brown

"In the land of the blind, he who has one eye is king"

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2003\02\28@112541 by Tal

flavicon
face
A different look at interpreters.

Any software that runs on any computer is executed by an interpreter.
The difference is how fast the interpreter is.

Compilation is merely a translation from one language to another but has
nothing to do with execution.

Fast interpreters are typically implemented in hardware/firmware and are
called CPUs and their language is referred to as 'machine code'.

Remember, only interpreters can run programs so let give them the
respect they deserve. ;-)

And if we want to be more accurate, computers are actually finite state
machines and programming them is simply picking the right starting state
but this is a different story.

Tal

> {Original Message removed}

2003\02\28@142214 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
> as far as i know, the stamps are interpreter based, and are
> therefore extremely slow.

Ah, but it turns out that the number of useful (and even marketable) things
that you can do with a "very slow" computer is actually quite large, as
long as certain common things that need to be fast are supported by the
'operating system' (and that's where the stamp has done quite well: picking
the functions that are in the "OS.")

It's a good thing, too, given that MOST microcontrollers might be labeled
as 'extemely slow' by afficiandos of the GFlop+ desktop computers that
are easy to come by these days...

BillW

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