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'Amazing low-end products (was Re: PIC Development '
1997\10\23@194705 by Scott Newell

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>Actually, the Atari 2600 video computer system (came out in '77) tended to
>use a "virtual display system"; the display hardware on that thing is dirt
>simple, but with proper software it can do some amazing things (Solaris, for
>example, is incredible).  Interestingly, until Activision came on the scene,
>the "virtual display" was chunky and pretty feeble-looking; Activision used
>some cool hacks to double the display resolution and most programmers since
>have followed their lead.  As a result, while the early Atari graphics
weren't


I recently hooked up a 2600 and looked at a few of the old Activision
games.  Pretty impressive when you consider how primitive the hardware is.


I've also been thinking about the low-end scientific calculators lately.
There must be quite a bit of floating point (or BCD) code in that little
chip to support all the trig, hyperbolic trig, log, and power functions.
Sure it's slow, but it's also cheap.  Think you could fit all those
functions into a PIC with similiar precision?  (24 bit mantissa FP won't
cut it, maybe BCD?)


later,
newell

1997\10\24@111902 by Matt Bonner

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Back in the early 80s, I bought a Mattel Intellivision for TV-based
video games - it was the only one to use a 16 bit processor (better than
the PCs of the day).  I bought mostly the sports games (at $60 CDN
each!) - the graphics were better than the Nintendo systems of the
mid-90s.

Trivia: what company made the 16 bit processor that went into the
Intellivision?

--Matt

1997\10\24@113644 by opossum

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On Friday, October 24, 1997 11:05 AM, Matt Bonner [SMTP:spam_OUTmbonnerTakeThisOuTspamSUNADA.COM]
wrote:
> Trivia: what company made the 16 bit processor that went into the
> Intellivision?

General Instruments PIC1600.  Wasn't it 14 bits?

1997\10\24@131009 by David W. Duley

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In a message dated 97-10-24 11:21:39 EDT, you write:

<<
Trivia: what company made the 16 bit processor that went into the
Intellivision?

--Matt
 >>
Matt,
Was it the TI 9900?
Dave Duley

1997\10\24@155808 by Matt Bonner

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David W. Duley wrote:
>
> In a message dated 97-10-24 11:21:39 EDT, you write:
>
> <<
>  Trivia: what company made the 16 bit processor that went into the
>  Intellivision?
>
>  --Matt
>   >>
> Matt,
> Was it the TI 9900?
All I know is that is was General Instruments (which became Microchip).
One response said it was a PIC1600 and that it was 14 bits.  I'll take
it out of storage this weekend and open it up (if it doesn't have weird
screws.  I'll let you know on Monday.
--Matt

1997\10\24@190712 by Steven J Tucker

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On Fri, 24 Oct 1997, David W. Duley wrote:

> In a message dated 97-10-24 11:21:39 EDT, you write:
>
> <<
>  Trivia: what company made the 16 bit processor that went into the
>  Intellivision?

GI :)

Steve

   * * *  Author of Imagic and APE - The Atari Peripheral Emulator!  * * *
   * * *      Turn your 8-bit Atari into a powerhouse with APE!      * * *
  *  *  *        Ape Homepage: http://www.nacs.net/~classics        *  *  *
*    *    *********************************************************    *    *
!! Request my *FOR SALE* LISTING OF CLASSIC VIDEO GAME STUFF -- 2000+ Items !!

1997\10\24@202233 by DREITEK

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In a message dated 97-10-24 19:42:31 EDT, you write:

<<
David W. Duley wrote:
>
> In a message dated 97-10-24 11:21:39 EDT, you write:
>
> <<
>  Trivia: what company made the 16 bit processor that went into the
>  Intellivision?
>
>  --Matt
>   >>
> Matt,
> Was it the TI 9900?
All I know is that is was General Instruments (which became Microchip).
One response said it was a PIC1600 and that it was 14 bits.  I'll take
it out of storage this weekend and open it up (if it doesn't have weird
screws.  I'll let you know on Monday.
--Matt
 >>
Actually I didn't write this.  I only made a guess that apparently was wrong.
I tried to think of a 16 bit micro that existed at the time.  I could only
think of two.  The TI9900 and a thing called the PACE (I can't remember who
made it).

Dave

1997\10\25@105504 by Andy Kunz

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>it out of storage this weekend and open it up (if it doesn't have weird
>screws.  I'll let you know on Monday.

Matt,

You must not be "one of us" if you don't have at least one of every
security screwdriver in your toolbox.

<G>

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\10\25@224802 by Pioneer Microsystems

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Andy Kunz wrote:

> >it out of storage this weekend and open it up (if it doesn't have weird
> >screws.  I'll let you know on Monday.
>
> Matt,
>
> You must not be "one of us" if you don't have at least one of every
> security screwdriver in your toolbox.
>
>

'One of us' usually makes the tool on the grinder on demand, or with a
drill, or a Dremel, or whatnot.  I wouldn't be too hard on the boy.  Unless
he chickens out and puts it away.

Chris

> Andy
>
> ==================================================================
> Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
>           Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
>         "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
> ==================================================================

1997\10\27@053249 by Mike Smith

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-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Kunz <.....montanaKILLspamspam@spam@FAST.NET>
To: PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Sunday, 26 October 1997 1:25
Subject: Re: Amazing low-end products (was Re: PIC Development Tools)


>>it out of storage this weekend and open it up (if it doesn't have weird
>>screws.  I'll let you know on Monday.
>
>Matt,
>
>You must not be "one of us" if you don't have at least one of every
>security screwdriver in your toolbox.


But the bastards keep bringing out new ones!

MikeS
<EraseMEmikesmith_ozspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTrelaymail.net>

1997\10\27@115658 by Matt Bonner

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Andy Kunz wrote:
>
> >it out of storage this weekend and open it up (if it doesn't have weird
> >screws.  I'll let you know on Monday.
>
> Matt,
>
> You must not be "one of us" if you don't have at least one of every
> security screwdriver in your toolbox.
>
I am probably "one of us" by "too much" (did that make sense?).
<sympathy mode ON>
A failed marriage and a move to a new city taught me to keep my work
life as separate as possible from work.  Now-adays I keep all my tools
and techno-bits at work.
<sympathy mode OFF>
It was actually the lack of a soldering iron (GASP) at home that kept me
from my self-appointed mission.  Screws were just Philips but the PCB
was encased in a metal case that was soldered together.  I'll bring it
in to work on Tuesday and take it apart over lunch.  I knew that the
Monday email load (98 today) would keep me from it today.

To go ever further off-topic:
Speaking about weird screws and such, when are you Yanks going embrace
Robertson head screws (those things that Bob Villa calls "square head"
screws)?  They don't slip like Philips and they stay put on the
screwdriver.
--Matt

1997\10\27@124445 by ndie Ohtsji [4555]

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Matt Bonner wrote:

> To go ever further off-topic:
> Speaking about weird screws and such, when are you Yanks going embrace
> Robertson head screws (those things that Bob Villa calls "square head"
> screws)?  They don't slip like Philips and they stay put on the
> screwdriver.

The Robertson has always been my favourite screw type.  They don't slip,
strip or wear out the screwdriver tip (like Philips).  And best of all,
they stay on the screwdriver tip so you can use one hand to screw the
darn thing in while using your other hand to do something else (like
holding the pieces you are trying to screw together).

I used to hate Philips screws....but I have come to the point of just
bearing with them as they are so common.   No offense intended to
anyone ..... got to be politically correct in these days ya know!


Just another Canadian opinion eh!.......unbiased of course eh!  ;)

-Randie

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1997\10\27@132855 by Tom Rogers

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Hey, I have a whole drawer full of those things, and a bunch of bits for my
Makita (which my wife gave me).

We can but them at the local hardware store, no problem.

--TR

-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Bonner <@spam@mbonnerKILLspamspamSUNADA.COM>

>To go ever further off-topic:
>Speaking about weird screws and such, when are you Yanks going embrace
>Robertson head screws (those things that Bob Villa calls "square head"
>screws)?  They don't slip like Philips and they stay put on the
>screwdriver.
>--Matt
>

1997\10\27@154208 by Andy Kunz

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>A failed marriage and a move to a new city taught me to keep my work
>life as separate as possible from work.  Now-adays I keep all my tools
>and techno-bits at work.

Sorry to hear about that.  Better to learn too late than never, I guess.

>Speaking about weird screws and such, when are you Yanks going embrace
>Robertson head screws (those things that Bob Villa calls "square head"
>screws)?  They don't slip like Philips and they stay put on the
>screwdriver.

When they are available from Digi-Key.  Personally, I prefer hex sockets on
my bolts (female on head of bolt).

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\10\27@170009 by Bob Blick

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> >To go ever further off-topic:
> >Speaking about weird screws and such, when are you Yanks going embrace
> >Robertson head screws (those things that Bob Villa calls "square head"

When embracing them, be sure to do it on the head side, not the pointed
side :-)

1997\10\27@183250 by )

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: Matt Bonner <KILLspammbonnerKILLspamspamSUNADA.COM>
>
> >To go ever further off-topic:
> >Speaking about weird screws and such, when are you Yanks going
> embrace
> >Robertson head screws (those things that Bob Villa calls "square
> head"
> >screws)?  They don't slip like Philips and they stay put on the
> >screwdriver.
> >--Matt
> >
>
>
A quick look through the McMaster Carr catalog reveals Robertson as well
as all those numerous tamper proof designs as well (plus the drivers for
them). I think their web site is http://www.mcmastercarr.com. They are a pain
in the neck to get a catalog out of and they are adamant about not
selling a copy. I would assume MSC also stocks them (don't have their
number handy, but if anyone wants it I'll post it. They don't have a web
site.)


Frank Richterkessing

RemoveMEFRANK.RICHTERKESSINGTakeThisOuTspamAPPL.GE.COM

1997\10\27@184320 by )

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I guess as long as we're discussing our favorite fasteners, I'll throw
my $0.02 in. I haven't read down my messages yet to see how this thread
got started, so excuse me if I'm out of turn.

In addition to being an EE, I'm also a (mostly) self taught machinist. I
have a preference for "Allen" or socket cap screws. I'll lump in Torx
and Robertson as derivatives. Over the years I've come to hate slotted
head (ever try to use a power driver with one?). I've also noticed that
a Phillips bit bears an amazing resemblance to a countersink bit and
tends to function like one -- especially on a Phillips head screw --
especially if its one that will be prominently visible on the front
panel of your newly completed project!


Frank Richterkessing

spamBeGoneFRANK.RICHTERKESSINGspamBeGonespamAPPL.GE.COM

1997\10\27@190809 by Herbert Graf

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>The Robertson has always been my favourite screw type.  They don't slip,
>strip or wear out the screwdriver tip (like Philips).  And best of all,
>they stay on the screwdriver tip so you can use one hand to screw the
>darn thing in while using your other hand to do something else (like
>holding the pieces you are trying to screw together).


   Gotta aggree with you one that one, I wish the world would get rid of
every screw head type out there and replace them all with robertsons, the
world would be a better place, especially when rid of all those stupid
"security" screws! :) TTYL (oh I almost forgot to use an eh, there we go...)

1997\10\27@193507 by Anil K. Patel

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On Monday, October 27, 1997 3:24 PM, Richterkessing, Frank H (GEA, 055132)
> [ ...snip... ]
> A quick look through the McMaster Carr catalog reveals Robertson as well
> as all those numerous tamper proof designs as well (plus the drivers for
> them). I think their web site is http://www.mcmastercarr.com. They are a pain
> in the neck to get a catalog out of and they are adamant about not
> selling a copy. I would assume MSC also stocks them (don't have their
> number handy, but if anyone wants it I'll post it. They don't have a web
> site.)
>
>
> Frank Richterkessing
>
> TakeThisOuTFRANK.RICHTERKESSINGEraseMEspamspam_OUTAPPL.GE.COM
>

Try going to their site at:

http://www.mcmaster.com/

I believe they have a searchable on-line version of their catalog.

--Anil

1997\10\28@054938 by Matt Bonner

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Andy Kunz wrote:
>
> >it out of storage this weekend and open it up (if it doesn't have weird
> >screws.  I'll let you know on Monday.
>
> Matt,
>
> You must not be "one of us" if you don't have at least one of every
> security screwdriver in your toolbox.
>
I am probably "one of us" by "too much" (did that make sense?).
<sympathy mode ON>
A failed marriage and a move to a new city taught me to keep my work
life as separate as possible from work.  Now-adays I keep all my tools
and techno-bits at work.
<sympathy mode OFF>
It was actually the lack of a soldering iron (GASP) at home that kept me
>From my self-appointed mission.  Screws were just Philips but the PCB
was encased in a metal case that was soldered together.  I'll bring it
in to work on Tuesday and take it apart over lunch.  I knew that the
Monday email load (98 today) would keep me from it today.

To go ever further off-topic:
Speaking about weird screws and such, when are you Yanks going embrace
Robertson head screws (those things that Bob Villa calls "square head"
screws)?  They don't slip like Philips and they stay put on the
screwdriver.
--Matt

--QAB01624.877971508/bruxelas--

1997\10\28@132711 by Steve Smith

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In a message dated 27/10/97  23:44:09, you write:

<<  I've also noticed that
a Phillips bit bears an amazing resemblance to a countersink bit and
tends to function like one -- especially on a Phillips head screw -- >>

This extreme version of tamper proofing also works well on Pozidrive screws.

Just another usless piece of information ..........

Steve..........

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