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PICList Thread
'Alarm Clock'
1998\10\12@145736 by Pascal MIQUET

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Hi folks,

Is there any chance to get stuf (I mean software and hardare solutions)
to make an alarm clock.
The purpose : Make an alarm clock with at least two settings by day, and
this each day of the Week.
Did somebody already make this kind of stuff ?
Thanks for your help
Pascal MiQUET
--
(PD: We have an agreement with God,
    He doesn't fix programs and
    we don't make miracles.  )

1998\10\12@161250 by Alan G. Smith

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Look at the Microchip App Notes


+---------------
| Alan G. Smith
| spam_OUTagsTakeThisOuTspampoboxes.com
| http://www.innovatus.com/ags

On Mon, 12 Oct 1998, Pascal MIQUET wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\10\12@185216 by William Chops Westfield

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I was going to build a smarter alarm clock.  Then my wife went out and
bought a new clock (indpendently) that had the most important feature I
was looking for (two separate alarms) for about $20.  Took all the fun
out of it.

:-(
BillW

PS: I think a 16F84 would be ideal a project like this - it's got enough
EEPROM data memory to save those alarm times peranantly, too, perhaps
depending on whether you need two, three, or seven (four, six, or fourteen?)
different alarm settings.

1998\10\13@083338 by Keith H

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William Chops Westfield wrote:

> I was going to build a smarter alarm clock.  Then my wife went out and
> bought a new clock (independently) that had the most important feature I
> was looking for (two separate alarms) for about $20.
> Took all the fun out of it.

Trust a woman to do something sensible like that!

Now you'll have time to do all those tedious jobs around the house.

Well, if it's not worth inventing a simple clock,
why not demonstrate skills by adding features like:
Atomic time reception.
Countdown to anniversary or wife's birthday.
Morning activation of radio/kettle/heater/ejector-bed.
Reminders to take medication.
Scrolling text messages proclaiming your talent.

BTW, are we talking battery-powered and LCD, or mains and LED?
If power is critical, how low can this be taken?

1998\10\13@085242 by Pascal MIQUET

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Keith H wrote:

> Trust a woman to do something sensible like that!
>
> Now you'll have time to do all those tedious jobs around the house.
>
> Well, if it's not worth inventing a simple clock,
> why not demonstrate skills by adding features like:
> Atomic time reception.

On which Transmetter, an international compatibility should be great,
because whe do not receive here in Europe, Americans signals. ( I think
)

> Countdown to anniversary or wife's birthday.
> Morning activation of radio/kettle/heater/ejector-bed.
> Reminders to take medication.
> Scrolling text messages proclaiming your talent.
>
> BTW, are we talking battery-powered and LCD, or mains and LED?
> If power is critical, how low can this be taken?

Thank to all people who give me an answer !
Pascal MiQUET
--
(PD: We have an agreement with God,
    He doesn't fix programs and
    we don't make miracles.  )

1998\10\13@121151 by Keith H

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Pascal MIQUET wrote:
> > Atomic time reception.
>
> On which Transmitter

In the UK, the Rugby 60kHz time signal.
My (shop-bought, 25 UKP) alarm clock receives this,
checking time every hour to save energy. 3V operation.

In mainland Europe, Germany transmits the DCF-77 signal.
The (expensive!) Junghans watches and clocks receive this.

There's another transmitter in the USA.

> an international compatibility should be great,Most stuff is for one system or
another.

Is this to be battery operated with a PIC?
If so you will need technique to sleep most of the time
but wake on keypresses.
Asleep = 3uA, Awake at 4MHz = 2mA for PIC16C55

1998\10\13@162222 by Mark Willis

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Keith H wrote:
> Pascal MIQUET wrote:
> > > Atomic time reception.
> > On which Transmitter
> In the UK, the Rugby 60kHz time signal.
> <snipped>

 My thought is that a GPS receiver might be best here?  (AFAIK
universal coordinated time is what GPS sends out?)  Not easiest to
implement necessarily (Antenna?  Encoding?), but I do believe that GPS's
send the same time signals out planet-wide so you'd just need to rotate
a 24-position switch (be it virtual or physical <G>) to the right time
zone & you're set (Maybe a second switch for whether you have Daylight
Savings or not locally, and you have a true world-wide clock, usable to
a half AU or so away from earth <G>)

 Mark, .....mwillisKILLspamspam@spam@nwlink.com

1998\10\13@184636 by Tony Nixon

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Pascal MIQUET wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
>
> Is there any chance to get stuf (I mean software and hardare solutions)
> to make an alarm clock.

Have a look at the Ol' Timer clock on the web site below. The sorce code
is there so that you can add to or modify it yourself.

--
Best regards

Tony

Multimedia 16F84 Beginners PIC Tools.
**New Improved PicNPost**

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email picnpokespamKILLspamcdi.com.au

1998\10\13@185644 by James Cameron

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Mark Willis wrote:
> [...] same time signals out planet-wide so you'd just need to rotate
> a 24-position switch (be it virtual or physical <G>) to the right time
> zone & you're set [...]

Well, if you've got the GPS signal all decoded like that, you already
_know_ where you are.  ;-)

--
James Cameron                                    (.....cameronKILLspamspam.....stl.dec.com)
Digital Equipment Corporation (Australia) Pty. Ltd. A.C.N. 000 446 800

1998\10\13@203656 by Lee Jones

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part 0 8266 bytes content-type:Text/Plain>>>>> Atomic time reception.
>>>> On which Transmitter
>>> In the UK, the Rugby 60kHz time signal.

>> My thought is that a GPS receiver might be best here?  (AFAIK
>> universal coordinated time is what GPS sends out?)

Until quite recently, I didn't know what GPS used internally.
Oddly enough, just this morning, I read a posting on another
mailing list that describes it.  It appears reasonable but I
can't vouch for its veracity.

If it's correct, GPS uses it's own time system with units of
1/403200 of a week (about 1.5 seconds).  I've attached the
entire article since I found it interesting -- others might
too.  I just hope the information contained therein is right. :-)

So atomic time reception, whether by radio waves or by modem
(via US NTIS, ex-NBS, ACTS) or by Internet NTP seems like a
more accurate method.


>> [...] same time signals out planet-wide so you'd just need to
>> rotate a 24-position switch (be it virtual or physical <G>) to
>> the right time zone & you're set [...]

> Well, if you've got the GPS signal all decoded like that, you
> already _know_ where you are.  ;-)

In terms of physical position on the earth, I agree.  But what
has that got to do with time zones, daylight savings time, etc.
Those are all _political_ animals.

At least in the United States, time zones are based on political
location.  So you'd need a full set of geographic boundaries of
all the states so that you could convert your earth location into
which political entity (state, sometimes county) controls your
time zone and if/when you observe daylight savings time.  It's
a real can of worms.

                                               Lee Jones

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02:15:37 1998
From: "Victor Healey" <@spam@fourphunKILLspamspambellsouth.net>
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Date: Tue, 13 Oct 1998 05:20:22 -0700
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Subject: [4phun-Scanning] Re: date rollover in GPS satellites
Status: RO

From: "Victor Healey" <fourphunEraseMEspam.....bellsouth.net>

November 1997  LETS MAKE A MOLEHILL OUT OF AT LEAST one MOUNTAIN!

Is the Year 2000 GPS "problem" REALLY a Problem at all?
=================================================================
I asked one of our GPS engineering consultants who is well versed
in GPS technology theory and practice to tell us what spectacular
event would happen to a GPS that was NOT "Y2000 compliant". Not
much says he. Read on for further comments. Since he does not
have time to respond to questions from the newsgroup, he has
asked that his name not be published. Here are his comments.
==================================================================

Joe, you wanted to post my comments about the Y2k and EOW
"controversy" (let's see now, that means End of World in Year
2000, doesn't it, like the television psychics want to predict).
Well, here is The Short Version (consider it an abstract).
Consider this oversimplified. But I note that at least one of
your readers won't be satisfied with anything less than an
official manufacturer's certifying stamp on each unit, accompa-
nied by an international press conference and appearances on
Oprah, Nightline, and Larry King Live and attested to by Bill
Clinton (;->).

Hey, ya know what? As far as position and navigation goes, Y2K
(and any other artificial calendar counting time) doesn't matter
one bit to a GPS receiver. The position of the SV is found from
the orbital elements and the difference between the epoch of the
element set as transmitted in the navigation message and the time
of transmission of the message. It's only a _difference_ in time,
not the absolute time. And both the orbital element time and the
message time are contained in the message. The computer doesn't
care whether you are measuring on a Gregorian calendar, a Moslem
calendar, a Chinese calendar, a Jewish calendar or one you just
made up. The algorithm just takes the times given in the message
and calculates the current Mean Anomaly, from which you get the
True Anomaly, from which you ultimately get the position of the
SV in GPS coordinates (NOT lat/lon, UTM, or other geography
units). The only place the date appears in some sort of everyday
calendar format is on your display screen.

And as has been pointed out many times before, the receiver's
clock is, at most, only used to get the initial search configura-
tion. It is _not_ used for the PVT solution iteration (Position-
Velocity-Time). When you put your receiver in free search mode
("autolocate"), it doesn't even use its own clock. The "message
received" time is determined as part of the solution in deriving
the pseudoranges for each satellite used. Sort of like the
lat/lon vs UTM in 100 different datums. The number shown isn't
what the computer in the GPS uses anyway - it's only there for
display purposes. The system coordinate system is an Earth-
centered Earth fixed Euclidian system, no latitudes, no
Eastings. Hey, guess what? It's like GPS time vs UTC vs your
local standard or daylight time. The GPS uses GPS time for its
computations, then displays whatever you want. In the vast
majority of units (all the consumer toys and virtually all the
marine and air navigation units) you can't display the GPS time,
even if you want to. The time units are 1/403200 of a week, which
is about 1.5 seconds, not seconds or nanoseconds (it's 1/806400
of a fortnight, though (8>D).

The one problem is the week rollover. And, ya know what? That
really is only a problem for a unit that doesn't have a current
ephemeris for a given SV for a short time around the rollover
date. If you are more than a few hours past the rollover, all the
SVs will have a new ephemeris, your internal clock will be
counting up mod 1024 weeks, and you are fine. The problem comes
when you have an ephemeris which is epoch 1023.xxx weeks and your
clock has rolled over to 1024.yyy, which means it reads 0.yyy. It
will compute a negative time, unless your unit has a way of
catching that (as do all units from the major manufacturers in
the past 5 or 10 years). But, since the ephemeris is uploaded a
couple times a day, at worst your position computation will be
wrong for a day or so in August 1999. My understanding from the
manufacturers I have talked to (4 of the major ones), or
indirectly from ones Joe, Sam, and Jack have had contact with,
is that current units catch even that small problem. Some older
units will have a hard time locking on because they are calculat-
ing visibilities from the canonical orbital elements stored in
ROM, but once they have locked on and updated their ephemeris
set, they will give the right location and time of day (but not
the right calendar day, just off by about 230 days).

Sigh! What it comes down to is that there are a bunch of folks
who have absolutely no concept of how orbital calculations are
done. Sorry folks, the Earth isn't flat, it isn't the center of
the universe, and even the Sun isn't the center of the universe.
I groan every time I see another of these anthropocentric,
ethnocentric, or worse yet, egocentric postings that claims that
the poster's way of viewing things is the only way, and the rest
of the universe can --- whoops, the universe can't jump in the
lake can it? (My calendar is the only one, my footruler is the
only way to measure, my view of the world is the only correct one
-so there!)
========================================================
I edited the above very slightly for clarity. If anyone has
questions/comments, please post.

Joe Mehaffey

1998\10\13@215216 by keller

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I have always wondered why thy can't make a lithium battery backed up clock
to keep time when the power is out.  How often do you check the stupid 9Vdc
battery in your clock to make sure it will work when the power goes out?  I
usually don't find out the 9Vdc battery is dead until about 9:00am when I
should have left for work already.

Steve Keller


{Original Message removed}

1998\10\14@100737 by Keith H

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Mark Willis wrote:

> My thought is that a GPS receiver might be best here?

Not in terms of cost! The rugby time signal is AM on 60kHz.
So you can pick it up with a simple resonant LC and tone decoder
(NE567 or XR2206). You can buy ready-made modules (see Maplin Cat.)
for c. 15 UKP. Or ready-made clocks for c. 25 UKP.

GPS gadgets seems a lot more expensive.

Steven Keller wrote:

> why can't they make a lithium battery backed up clock
> to keep time when the power is out.

Think about it! How often would you check that lithium cell?

What you need is a low battery warning.
My clock does this by making the night-light flash several times
instead of a single pulse. Course, you only notice this when
you check the time in the dark. Which I do often enough.

Alternatively you could make the second hand move twice
every other second, as it does when first setting the time.

With an LCD display you could write the text
"Battery low for ??? hours" so you know how urgently
you need to buy a couple more!

1998\10\17@014152 by Mark Willis

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Keith H wrote:
> Mark Willis wrote:
> > My thought is that a GPS receiver might be best here?
>
> Not in terms of cost! The rugby time signal is AM on 60kHz.
> So you can pick it up with a simple resonant LC and tone decoder
> (NE567 or XR2206). You can buy ready-made modules (see Maplin Cat.)
> for c. 15 UKP. Or ready-made clocks for c. 25 UKP.
>
> GPS gadgets seems a lot more expensive.

 ... And, though it'd work great for you, over there in the U.K., would
not work at ALL here in the US (I was writing in the context of a
world-wide product, that'd work anywhere any time near the earth.)

 A cheap solution that doesn't work, isn't optimal <G>

 Mark

1998\10\17@020929 by paulb

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Mark Willis wrote:

>   ... And, though it'd work great for you, over there in the U.K.,
> would not work at ALL here in the US (I was writing in the context of
> a world-wide product, that'd work anywhere any time near the earth.)

>   A cheap solution that doesn't work, isn't optimal <G>

 Do I discern a hint of parochial universalism?
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\10\19@141725 by John Payson

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part 0 278 bytes
My alarm clock (WestClox 2000 I think) features two time-of-day
alarms, along with a countdown timer (1-99 minutes), and selectable
5-10-20 minute snooze.  All for about $15 I think.

Now if only they could make one that would add a few more hours of
actual time each night...

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