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'ATX power on?'
2004\07\14@204528 by Peter van Hoof

picon face
Hi Marc,

Go to: atx12v power supply guide
formfactors.org/developer/specs/ATX12V%20PSDG2.01.pdf
section 3.3.2 and see the specs. I'm not sure if this is the way to go
because you will have to maintain low level to keep the supply turned on i
am not sure if after an initial low the motherboard will take over. It would
be annoying if the motherboard cannot switch the supply off.

A better solution is probably interfacing the case switch side of the
motherboard

Peter van Hoof

{Original Message removed}

2004\07\14@223151 by techy fellow

picon face
Hi Guys,

While we are on this topic, may I know how do I 'switch on' the ATX PS directly and independently ? Ie. the ATX PSU is not connected to the Mobo. Just FYI, my PC died recently and I have switched to Notebook as a desktop replacement. However, storage is a problem (too little on a NB). Hence, I am reusing my 3.5" hard-disk and DVD Writer by placing them into external casing. The problem is, each external casing comes with its own PSU. This mean, I have to remember to switch on each one of them everytime when I want to use them and 'off' when I am not using them. Imagine, what if I have 4 such external devices (2 hard-disks, 1 DVD Rom and 1 DVD Writer).

I thought why not make use of a typical ATX PSU which has ample number of PS cable that is used by Hard-disk and CDRom drives anyway. If I can 'feed' each external device with a PS cable from the ATX PSU, I just have to switch just the ATX PSU on/ off only !!

Thanks in advance for the help.

cheers,
Davis

Peter van Hoof <spam_OUTpvhTakeThisOuTspamADELPHIA.NET> wrote:
Hi Marc,

Go to: atx12v power supply guide
formfactors.org/developer/specs/ATX12V%20PSDG2.01.pdf
section 3.3.2 and see the specs. I'm not sure if this is the way to go
because you will have to maintain low level to keep the supply turned on i
am not sure if after an initial low the motherboard will take over. It would
be annoying if the motherboard cannot switch the supply off.

A better solution is probably interfacing the case switch side of the
motherboard

Peter van Hoof

{Original Message removed}

2004\07\14@231211 by Anthony Toft

flavicon
face
> While we are on this topic, may I know how do I 'switch on' the
> ATX PS directly and independently ? Ie. the ATX PSU is not
> connected to the Mobo. Just FYI, my PC died recently and I have

Switch it on by connecting pin 14 of the mobo header to ground (it's
usually the green cable, let it float for off.

> I thought why not make use of a typical ATX PSU which has ample
> number of PS cable that is used by Hard-disk and CDRom drives

Using it in this mode will work OK, but remember that the PSU won't
output anything without some load, the exact requirements seem to change
from manuf. to manuf. but I have had luck with 10 Ohms on the 5v line
(10W resistor with a heat sink)
--
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2004\07\15@010322 by techy fellow

picon face
Thanks so much for the info and tips. Really appreciates it.

cheers,
Davis

Anthony Toft <.....toftatKILLspamspam.....COWSHED.8M.COM> wrote:
> While we are on this topic, may I know how do I 'switch on' the
> ATX PS directly and independently ? Ie. the ATX PSU is not
> connected to the Mobo. Just FYI, my PC died recently and I have

Switch it on by connecting pin 14 of the mobo header to ground (it's
usually the green cable, let it float for off.

> I thought why not make use of a typical ATX PSU which has ample
> number of PS cable that is used by Hard-disk and CDRom drives

Using it in this mode will work OK, but remember that the PSU won't
output anything without some load, the exact requirements seem to change
from manuf. to manuf. but I have had luck with 10 Ohms on the 5v line
(10W resistor with a heat sink)
--
Anthony Toft

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2004\07\15@030903 by Morgan Olsson

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face
Anthony Toft 05:12 2004-07-15:
>Using it in this mode will work OK, but remember that the PSU won't
>output anything without some load

Worse, it is usually not stable, or will risk cycle on/off with too little load.

/Morgan


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2004\07\15@070821 by Anand Dhuru

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face
You would have the issue of maintaining a certain load on all PC supplies,
ATX or the older ones. But, if the absence of a physical switch the only
reason you are looking for an old supply, consider this. The ATX supply has
a green wire (bunched up with the others going to the mobo). This is the
control signal from the motherboard to the supply. Just change its state
with a switch (not a momentary, a toggle), and the supply should come to
life.

Regards,

Anand Dhuru

{Original Message removed}

2004\07\17@222410 by hilip Stortz

picon face
it depends a lot on the particular power supply.  i have an old pc power
supply running a full size 5 1/2" full height old drive and older cd
burner in a box, to my surprise it seems to work fine even with the
drive spun down and the burner not doing anything.  i don't think it
draws much from the 5V and nearly nothing from the 12V sitting there so
i was very surprised.  it depends on the specific design and
implementation of the power supply.  some switchers will handle a  very
low load, some need 10% or more to be remotely stable or avoid over
voltages or other damage to the supply etc. (i only tried this because i
had a spare, and it wasn't a huge supply so i might have a 10% load with
nothing running).  in any case, if you anticipate running with a light
load, best to test it with a dummy load first so you don't smoke things
that matter (other than possibly the power supply, but i got mine free
as they were headed for the trash).

Morgan Olsson wrote:
>
> Anthony Toft 05:12 2004-07-15:
> >Using it in this mode will work OK, but remember that the PSU won't
> >output anything without some load
>
> Worse, it is usually not stable, or will risk cycle on/off with too little load.
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2004\07\18@074711 by appt

face
flavicon
face
> it depends a lot on the particular power supply.  i have an old pc power
> supply running a full size 5 1/2" full height old drive and older cd
> burner in a box, to my surprise it seems to work fine even with the
> drive spun down and the burner not doing anything.  i don't think it
> draws much from the 5V and nearly nothing from the 12V sitting there so
> i was very surprised.  it depends on the specific design and
> implementation of the power supply

Note that the regulation of the 12v supply (and probably other rails as
well) is probably dependent on having some current drawn at 5v - they are
usually magnetically linked.


       RM

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