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'AN512 - Huh??'
1998\09\17@060405 by Quentin

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Hi
Please can someone look at AN512, Ohmeter.asm and explain to me what the
following commands do:

SKPNC, CLRC, SKPZ, SKPC, SETC.

It's got me totally confused. Is it macro's? If so, then where is it
defined?
If I run the program in MPSIM I see that they do something, but I got no
idea what.

As confused as a chameleon on a comic strip.
Quentin

1998\09\17@062241 by Tom De Smet

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At first sight, without knowing the AN, this seems to be an acronym of
some
macro which means skip if no carry, clear carry, skip if zero, skip if
carry, set carry.




{Quote hidden}

1998\09\17@062450 by paulb

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Quentin wrote:

> Please can someone look at AN512, Ohmeter.asm

 Nah, can't be bothered!

> and explain to me what the following commands do:

> SKPNC,

 btfsc status,C  ; skip if no carry

> CLRC,

 bcf STATUS,C    ; clear carry

> SKPZ,

 btfss status,Z  ; skip if zero

> SKPC,

 btfss status,C  ; skip if carry

> SETC.

 bsf STATUS,C    ; set carry

> Is it macro's?

 Yep.

> If so, then where is it defined?

 In the assembler itself.  Documented in the help files apparently.

> As confused as a chameleon on a comic strip.

 Never mind, we're friendly.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\09\17@062456 by g.daniel.invent.design

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Quentin:

go to help, MPASM in MPLAB.
look up instruction set for processor family i.e. 16CXX
print out "Special Instructions"

These are macros embedded into MPASM to make the RISC instructions
easier to use when status flags are involved.

regards,
Graham Daniel,
Electronic Product Enhancements.

Quentin wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\09\17@084434 by Keith H

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Quentin wrote:

> As confused as a chameleon on a comic strip.

You've tried this? You cruel bugger!

I bet you're the kind of person who sellotapes
breadcrumbs to the inside of your windows so you
can watch birds knock themselves out trying to
get at them!

1998\09\17@090647 by Ian Rozowsky

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These are macros which were surreptitiously included in the assembler
(But then 5 or so years ago, when documentation was
scarce, most things were surreptitious) I wonder how many on this
list spent days back then figuring out little nuances which are
easily found in a few minutes in todays databooks!!

SKPNC   Skip if no carry        (Same as BTFSC   STATUS,0)
CLRC    Clear carry             (Same as BCF STATUS,0)
SKPZ    Skip if zero    (Same as BTFSC STATUS,2)
SKPC    Skip if carry   (Same as BTFSS STATUS,0)
SETC    Set carry               (Same as BSF STATUS,0)

I don't use them personally, but then I guess they could save a few
keystrokes.

Regards
Ian Rozowsky
Development Engineer
Centurion Systems
Box 506 Cramerview 2060 South Africa
Tel   : +27-11-708-2680
Fax   : +27-11-708-2630
e-mail: rozspamKILLspamcentsys.co.za

1998\09\17@100110 by Quentin

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Hehe, or stick sellotape under a cat's paws. I guess we all did that
sometime or another.

Quentin

Keith H wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\09\17@112607 by Keith H

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Quentin wrote:

> Hehe, or stick sellotape under a cat's paws.
> I guess we all did that sometime or another.
No, I don't think we have.
With a mind like that you should consider
becoming a supervillain in a Bond movie.

Why not use your ingenuity for the good of catkind,
perhaps inventing a robotic rodent for cats to chase?
They get bored with static ones,
even those stuffed with catnip.

1998\09\17@121232 by William Chops Westfield

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As someone only vaguely familiar with PIC mnemonics (one of these days
i'll actually write some code), I find "SKPNC" obvious, and "BTFSC STATUS,0"
less so (what does the "B" stand for?)

BillW

1998\09\17@143224 by Peter L. Peres

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On Thu, 17 Sep 1998, William Chops Westfield wrote:

> As someone only vaguely familiar with PIC mnemonics (one of these days
> i'll actually write some code), I find "SKPNC" obvious, and "BTFSC STATUS,0"
> less so (what does the "B" stand for?)

B == BIT as in Bit Test (in) File, Skip (if) Cleared

I don't like SKPNC because not all micros have just ONE carry bit to start
with.  Making von Neumann/Wintel assumptions on RISC cores is bad idea
imho.

Peter

1998\09\17@152814 by Sean Breheny

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Hi Bill,

B=Bit
BTFSC=Bit Test in F, Skip if Clear

Sean

At 08:36 AM 9/17/98 PDT, you wrote:
>As someone only vaguely familiar with PIC mnemonics (one of these days
>i'll actually write some code), I find "SKPNC" obvious, and "BTFSC STATUS,0"
>less so (what does the "B" stand for?)
>
>BillW
>
+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
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1998\09\17@193032 by Tony Nixon

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Keith H wrote:
>
> Quentin wrote:
>
> > As confused as a chameleon on a comic strip.
>
> You've tried this? You cruel bugger!
>
> I bet you're the kind of person who sellotapes

Or tied a fly with a hair that's stuck to a table and watch it buzz
around all day.

--
Best regards

Tony

Multimedia 16F84 Beginners PIC Tools.
**New Improved PicNPost**

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email EraseMEpicnpokespam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTcdi.com.au

1998\09\18@033302 by Dr. Imre Bartfai

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Hi,

I agree. BTW, "B" stands for "Bit"
BTFSC means Bit Test File, Skip if Clear

Imre


On Thu, 17 Sep 1998, William Chops Westfield wrote:

> As someone only vaguely familiar with PIC mnemonics (one of these days
> i'll actually write some code), I find "SKPNC" obvious, and "BTFSC STATUS,0"
> less so (what does the "B" stand for?)
>
> BillW
>
>

1998\09\18@053823 by John Sanderson

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Hello Bill & PIC.ers,

>Date:    Thu, 17 Sep 1998 08:36:52 PDT
>From:    William Chops Westfield <billwspamspam_OUTCISCO.COM>
>Subject: Re: AN512 - Huh??

>As someone only vaguely familiar with PIC mnemonics (one of these days
>i'll actually write some code), I find "SKPNC" obvious, and "BTFSC STATUS,0"
>less so (what does the "B" stand for?)

>BillW

I think it's just:
BTFSC  =  `Bit Test in Freg, Skip on Clear'

yebo, I agree, the uchip mnemonics are sometimes a bit obscure in
meaning. If SKPNC, etc. had been adopted from the beginning, source
code would be closer to English and a little further from Klingon.

Best regards,   John
..
email from John Sanderson at
JS Controls, PO Box 1887, Boksburg 1460, Rep. South Africa
Manufacturer & purveyor of laboratory force testing apparatus
and related products and services.
Tel/fax: Johannesburg 893 4154    Cellphone 082 453 4815

1998\09\18@084949 by Andy Kunz

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>yebo, I agree, the uchip mnemonics are sometimes a bit obscure in
>meaning. If SKPNC, etc. had been adopted from the beginning, source
>code would be closer to English and a little further from Klingon.

I suppose you like Intel mnemonics, then.  Get with it!

Andy


==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\09\18@115012 by Quentin

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> I think it's just:
> BTFSC  =  `Bit Test in Freg, Skip on Clear'
>
> yebo, I agree, the uchip mnemonics are sometimes a bit obscure in
> meaning. If SKPNC, etc. had been adopted from the beginning, source
> code would be closer to English and a little further from Klingon.
>
> Best regards,   John

Nobo, I disagree. I suppose it depends on what chip you started your
machine language programming on. After I dabbled a bit with 8051 code and
then switch to PICs mainstream, I found that PIC mnemonics say exactly what
it stands for, ex.: _B_it _T_est (in) _F_unction (register), _S_kip (if)
_C_lear. And there are only 33-35 instructions to learn.  , Macro's are
suppose to make the job easier, but IMO, it just adds to the confusion if
not declared properly.

I guess its very much depended on how you prefer to understand it. Another
problem I have sometimes is the confusion that is created with the use of
double labels for registers when I read OPP (Other People's Programs), such
as OUTPUT EQU PORTA (with PORTA already made EQU to 0x005 before anyway). I
always have to go back to the register declarations to check what OUTPUT
is.

Happily raving on a Friday Afternoon.
Quentin

1998\09\18@134424 by William Chops Westfield

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Heh.  I suppose we should refrain from getting into a mnemonic debate,
but the wide variety of things assigned to the "F" in BTFSC (File, Function,
Flags, etc) has been quite amusing.  Do you know what the databook says?
       BTFSC   =       Bit Test and Skip if Clear              :-)

("File" seems most correct, though - it's an operation on the register file,
rather than on "memory".  Never mind that there aren't many operations that
work on anything other than a file register.)

Aside from that, I think my major complaint that some "words" are reused
as both a verb and a adjective.  "Clear", for instance.

BillW

1998\09\18@194617 by goflo

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> ... the uchip mnemonics are sometimes a bit obscure in
> meaning. If SKPNC, etc. had been adopted from the beginning, source
> code would be closer to English and a little further from Klingon.

My 1st assembler was TI's TMS 70XX family - ALL this stuff looks
like Klingon after that ... :)

Regards, Jack

1998\09\19@074220 by paulb

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Tony Nixon wrote:

> Or tied a fly with a hair that's stuck to a table and watch it buzz
> around all day.

 Actually, I often wish *all* flies were so attached.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

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