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'A game for graphical LCD [OT]'
1998\05\31@035013 by Josef Hanzal

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I am designing an instrument which should provide the user with an option
"to play game" (of course in the spare time). The instrument is equipped
with graphical LCD 128 pixels wide, 64 pixels in height, several keys
(probably membrane keypad in final version). The display ON and OFF time is
about 250msec, so it does not allow any fast actions.

The question is what game would fit the display size and speed and use small
number of keys (say four). It should be game for one player. To stay
slightly on topic, there are at least two PICs inside each instrument. TIA
for any suggestions.

Josef

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1998\05\31@125452 by Thomas McGahee

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Josef,
Try to keep the game simple. Something like the old
"PONG" ping pong game would be easy to implement.
"BREAKOUT" is another old game that lends itself to
fairly simple programming. Look at some of the really
EARLY video games for inspiration.

For those who may not know,
PONG was the very first video game. You have two
paddles on the screen that are just short vertical
bars that can be slid up and down. A ball consisting
of one or four pixels is launched by the program,
and the player tries to return it. You can handicap
the computer side by giving it different values of
delay. That allows the game to be played on different
levels. As you get better, the computer gets faster.
Paddle size also sets difficulty level.

Resources required are pretty low. An xy value defines the
current ball location. Only a y location is needed for each
paddle, as they are fixed in the x direction. If you keep
track of average paddle velocity you can use that info to give
"spin" or "english" to the ball. The ball has a direction
and a velocity as well as xy position, but these can be bit
encoded into a single byte. When the ball's xy matches the
x of the paddle, check the y value to see if it is within
the y range occupied by the paddle. If so, the ball gets
returned based on velocity/direction/spin, etc. And you
can keep track of number of user returns, if desired. Same
goes for computer paddle. Whenever ball's next calculated
position is off the screen or behind the paddle, then that is
scored against the paddle. There is really little difference
between the handling of the user paddle and the computer's paddle.
Thus the same code can do double duty. Scoring info can be
"on top" of the playing field, or relegated to an edge of
the screen. For the world's simplest scoring indicator, use
two rows of pixels that grow with increasing score. Simple,
and you can see at a glance who is winning.

Another simple game is the WORM. There are pixels on the screen
that you try to get without hitting the edges of the screen or
certain simple barriers. Everytime you "get" one of the pixels
your worm grows one pixel longer. You can only gather pixels
by hitting them head-on. As your worm gets longer it eventually
gets in the way and it ends up hitting itself. Speed sets
level of difficulty.

Hope this helps.
Fr. Tom McGahee

----------
{Quote hidden}

1998\05\31@144906 by David VanHorn

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>For those who may not know,
>PONG was the very first video game.


BZZZT..

The first commercial video game was "space war".
It didn't catch on.  It had a sculpted fibreglass shell
The game was two "spaceships" shooting at each
other, and the sun could have gravity set to normal,
none, and reverse.

Pong was #2

1998\05\31@191918 by Dennis Plunkett

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At 01:41 PM 31/05/98 -0500, you wrote:
>>For those who may not know,
>>PONG was the very first video game.
>
>
>BZZZT..
>
>The first commercial video game was "space war".
>It didn't catch on.  It had a sculpted fibreglass shell
>The game was two "spaceships" shooting at each
>other, and the sun could have gravity set to normal,
>none, and reverse.
>
>Pong was #2
>
>

Hummm,
I thought that it was actualy "Space Invader" after it was dicovered that
the pilots got addicted to the game.

As for PONG, I think that the answer is correct, it was the first video
game, for "Home use"






-=====================================================================-

Dennis Plunkett: Embedded Hardware, Software design
NEC Australia DRMASS
Line Interface cards
TRX software
ISDN interface card
ph 03 9264-3867

-=====================================================================-

1998\05\31@193336 by David VanHorn

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>Hummm,
>I thought that it was actualy "Space Invader" after it was dicovered that
>the pilots got addicted to the game.


Arcade video:   Space war, Pong, Pong doubles.. After that it gets fuzzy.
I was a game repairman then.

>As for PONG, I think that the answer is correct, it was the first video
>game, for "Home use"


That I'll buy. Remember how amazing it was? :)


'A game for graphical LCD [OT]'
1998\06\01@000958 by Eric Smith
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Thomas McGahee <EraseMEtom_mcgaheespam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTSIGMAIS.COM>
>For those who may not know,
>PONG was the very first video game.

David VanHorn <dvanhornspamspam_OUTCEDAR.NET> wrote:
> BZZZT..
> The first commercial video game was "space war".
> It didn't catch on.  It had a sculpted fibreglass shell
> The game was two "spaceships" shooting at each
> other, and the sun could have gravity set to normal,
> none, and reverse.

BZZZT..

The first commercial video game was "Computer Space".  It had the
sculpted fiberglass shell.  It did not have adjustable gravity.

The commercial "Space Wars" (based on the earlier PDP-1 game by Steve "Slug"
Russell) was introduced many years later (1978?) by Cinematronics.  It had
adjustable gravity and various other interesting game options.  It was
implemented using a processor made from SSI and MSI TTL.  The PIC16C66/67/76/77
is roughly comparable.

Pong was considered the first >successful< commercial video game.

1998\06\01@012327 by William Chops Westfield

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Was the original PONG digital?  My brother built a version from plans
in popular electronics that was done mostly in analog...

BillW

1998\06\01@144209 by Chris Snell

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How about space invaders, its a lot more interesting and addictive than some
modern games!
Speed is not to important and only 3 keys are required! (left, right and
fire)
Let me know how you get on.

Chris

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{Original Message removed}

1998\06\01@210611 by paulb

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Thomas McGahee wrote:

> PONG was the very first video game. You have two
> paddles on the screen that are just short vertical
> bars that can be slid up and down.

> If you keep track of average paddle velocity you can use that info to
> give "spin" or "english" to the ball.

 I thought the usual method was simpler - if the ball hits the centre
half of the paddle, it rebounds with the same Y-velocity component, but
if it hits the upper or lower quarter of the paddle, the Y-velocity is
altered in the corresponding direction.  This models a paddle with
chamfered edges.

 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\06\01@210619 by paulb

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David VanHorn wrote:

> The first commercial video game was "space war".
> The game was two "spaceships" shooting at each other, and the sun
> could have gravity set to normal, none, and reverse.

 Are you referring to an "asteroids" precursor using vector graphics?
I have yet to get my hands on one of the little "home" versions of that
(latter) in decent condition.

 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\06\01@211903 by Eric Smith

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William Chops Westfield <RemoveMEbillwTakeThisOuTspamCISCO.COM> asks:
> Was the original PONG digital?  My brother built a version from plans
> in popular electronics that was done mostly in analog...

It was a mixture.  IIRC, it was mostly digital, but the player controls
(potentiometers) were part of the RC time constant for one-shots that
determined paddle vertical position.  The vertical sync pulse would trigger
the one-shot, and when it timed out the paddle started and a second one-shot
with a fixed time constant was triggered to time the paddle height.  The
paddle vertical position was anded with a digitally-derived horizontal
position to generate the actual paddle video.

The sounds were simply gated bits from the vertical counter.

1998\06\01@213256 by Eric Smith

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Martin Green <spamBeGoneMartin_GreenspamBeGonespamCONSUMERSGAS.COM> wrote:
>      Consider this a vote for Pong as the first video game.

It's not something that needs to be voted on.

Computer Space was the first commercial coin-operated video arcade game.
It was manufactured and sold by Nutting Associates in 1972.

Pong was introduced in 1973, and was the first >successful< coin-op
video game.

The coin-op Space Wars was introduced by Cinematronics in 1978.

Both Computer Space and Space Wars were based on what may have been the
first non-commercial computer video game:  "Spacewar!", written in 1962
by Steve "Slug" Russell for the DEC PDP-1 computer.

       ars-http://www.uchicago/~eric/lore/spacewar/spacewar.html

There's a PDP-1 simulator in Java that runs Spacewar!:

       lcs.http://www.media.mit.edu/groups/el/projects/spacewar/

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