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'5V low dropout regulator???'
1998\09\30@095513 by Aaron Hickman

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To all,

       Can anyone suggest a 5V regulator with low quiescent current and
able to supply at least 100mA of current?  There are so many to choose
from, so I thought some of you might have a favorite I could start with.

Sincerely,

Aaron Hickman

1998\09\30@112537 by Matt Bonner

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Aaron Hickman wrote:
>         Can anyone suggest a 5V regulator with low quiescent current and
> able to supply at least 100mA of current?  There are so many to choose
> from, so I thought some of you might have a favorite I could start with.
>
Aaron,

Take a look at National Semiconductor's LP2954A, it can supply up to
250mA.
 Dropout:    60mV (typ) at 1mA
            310mV (typ) at 100mA
 Quiescent:  90uA (typ) at 1mA
            4.5mA (typ) at 100mV

The last spec may be unacceptable (we use it at a load of 500uA).  They
also have an output switchable model: LP2957A.

--Matt

1998\09\30@120247 by andre

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Aaron,
I use LM2937 or LM2936 they both good for 125 C

Andre


Aaron Hickman wrote:

> To all,
>
>         Can anyone suggest a 5V regulator with low quiescent current and
> able to supply at least 100mA of current?  There are so many to choose
> from, so I thought some of you might have a favorite I could start with.
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Aaron Hickman

1998\09\30@125848 by David W. Duley

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In a message dated 9/30/98 7:18:31 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
spam_OUThickmaabTakeThisOuTspamDUNX1.OCS.DREXEL.EDU writes:

<< To all,

        Can anyone suggest a 5V regulator with low quiescent current and
able to supply at least 100mA of current?  There are so many to choose
from, so I thought some of you might have a favorite I could start with.

Sincerely,

Aaron Hickman
 >>
Hi Aaron,
I have used the Toko line with great success.  They are available from
digikey.  They have a three terminal version that will do in excess of 180ma
with 60ua quiescent current.

Dave Duley

P.S.
Why does the name Aaron have two 'A's?
just wondering

1998\09\30@200621 by Antonio L Benci

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I've had good success with the NatSemi LM2937ET-5.0. These are good to
500mA.

Aaron Hickman wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Nino.
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'5V low dropout regulator???'
1998\10\01@001530 by Russell McMahon
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I use the LM2936 because it also has a VERY low quiescent current. It
doesn't provide 100ma - in fact I use two in parallel in one design
because it was the best choice when the design was implemented
several years ago. Measurement of typical quiescent currents showed
them to be much better than the data books worst case. Perhaps there
is now a better choice. If anyone can suggest a very low dropout very
low quiescent design that also does 100ma I also would like to know.
.
A discrete component regulator using 4 transistors (or 3 if the main
pass element is a darlington) will better any commercial design (3
years ago :-)) in terms of quiescent current, dropout and pass
current but the higher parts count may make it unacceptable.
.
.regards

           Russell

-----Original Message-----
From: Aaron Hickman <.....hickmaabKILLspamspam.....DUNX1.OCS.DREXEL.EDU>
>        Can anyone suggest a 5V regulator with low quiescent current
and
>able to supply at least 100mA of current?  There are so many to
choose
>from, so I thought some of you might have a favorite I could start
with.

>Aaron Hickman
>

1998\10\01@005031 by Sean Breheny

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Russell,

When you paralleled these, did you need any ballast resistors? What kind of
pass transistor do these regs. have internally? Is it bipolar or CMOS. If
bipolar, I would think that you would need the balast resistors for
temperature stability (unless the reg has its own internal temp
compensation which is good enough) and to handle small diferences in the
gain of the transistors.

Sean

At 11:24 AM 10/1/98 +1200, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

1998\10\01@033430 by rvfintel

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Hi

I have used the MAX667. I needed it to generate 5v
from a 9v battery source. So far I have had no hassles at all.

Maxim, the manufacturers state that it can deliver 250 mA output
current.

The data sheet can be downloaded at:
http://www.maxim-ic.com/efp/PwrSup.htm

Good luck

1998\10\01@065716 by Russell McMahon

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Good but the quiescent current is not especially low.

-----Original Message-----
From: Antonio L Benci <EraseMENino.Bencispam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTSCI.MONASH.EDU.AU>

I've had good success with the NatSemi LM2937ET-5.0. These are good
to
500mA.

1998\10\01@193220 by paulb

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Sean Breheny wrote:

> When you paralleled these, did you need any ballast resistors?  What
> kind of pass transistor do these regs. have internally?  Is it bipolar
> or CMOS. If bipolar, I would think that you would need the ballast
> resistors for temperature stability (unless the reg has its own
> internal temp compensation which is good enough) and to handle small
> diferences in the gain of the transistors.

 I don't think so.  Notwithstanding the internal construction, most
regulators are designed to current limit, and to taper the limit current
according to temperature.  As such, the regulator whose setpoint
(voltage) is higher will provide as much current as it chooses, allowing
the other to make up the balance.

 A bit crude, but much like paralleling a regulator with a resistor to
"ballast" most of the current if you can predict the load, as is done in
most TV sets!
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

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