Searching \ for '25 watts' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=watts
Search entire site for: '25 watts'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'25 watts'
1998\09\03@073507 by Matt D K

picon face
I'm ready for my first PIC application and am worried about my 25 watt
sodering iron frying it. Is the PIC that sensative to heat? Is glue a
better alternatie?

                                                           Matt K
                                 "Just your not so average electronics
geek"

_____________________________________________________________________
You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com
Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]

1998\09\03@115346 by David Reinagel

picon face
Hi,
       Its not the power of the soldering iron that fries parts, but how
long you apply the heat.  A well handled 100 Watt soldering iron in some
cases is better as it keeps it temperature more constant when you make
thermo-contact.  The key to not damaging parts is learning how to solder
well, and I don't know any better way to do that than practice.  When I
have trained others to solder, I have gotten some unused PC boards and
a few hundred resistors, and have them practice for a day soldering (and
unsoldering) parts until they learn some technique.
       To get consistant good solder joints, use an iron-clad fine soldering
tip; keep it clean by wipping it on a wet spongue about once a minute and
just before its first use.  Also, use a fine solder - about .020" to .031"
diameter for general use; .012" for surface-mount ICs.
       Hope these tips help.

Dave Reinagel
Cisco Systems, Inc.

{Quote hidden}

1998\09\03@123715 by John Hansen

picon face
At 07:25 AM 9/3/98 -0400, you wrote:
>I'm ready for my first PIC application and am worried about my 25 watt
>sodering iron frying it. Is the PIC that sensative to heat? Is glue a
>better alternatie?
>
>                                                            Matt K
>                                  "Just your not so average electronics
>geek"
>
>_____________________________________________________________________
>You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
>Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com
>Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
>

You'll probably be ok, but why not use an IC socket so you don't
have to get the iron anywhere near the chip?

John Hansen
.....hansenKILLspamspam.....fredonia.edu

1998\09\03@130349 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>I'm ready for my first PIC application and am worried about my 25 watt
>sodering iron frying it. Is the PIC that sensative to heat? Is glue a
>better alternatie?


I use a 40 watt weller for everything, all that matters is that you make the
joint cleanly and quickly.
Don't use 60/40 solder, it bites. (and it makes cold joints) Use 63/37, from
a reputable source like kester.
Flux isn't needed, unless everything's old and dull.

Too little wattage will have you sitting on that pin for a long time,
waiting for it to heat up. I made that mistake once, paid tons of money for
Ungar princess 6W tools, only to find that the good old 40W weller with
chisel tip does the job very nicely.

Don't use glue.

1998\09\03@130905 by shadedemon

picon face
This guy stepped in halfway through Myke's problem with
glue being an accidental conductor, and somehow got the
notion that he was using glue INSTEAD of solder and not just
to hold parts on board for wrapping/soldering.


David Reinagel wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\09\03@131307 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>You'll probably be ok, but why not use an IC socket so you don't
>have to get the iron anywhere near the chip?


Damned good idea! Your code probably won't work right the first time either,
:) You'll need to reprogram it.

1998\09\04@023038 by Russell McMahon

picon face
A 25 watt iron is fine as long as you are adequately careful. A low
wattage iron with a small tip (or an iron of any wattage at all with
temperature control) will make soldering easier.

Don't overheat the part and you'll be OK.
Gluing is not at all desirable as a way of electrical connection. The
recent discussion related to fastening components in place in unusual
or prototype circumstances.

At the risk of being flamed for abominable soldering practice ...

{{Solder shields up}}

Soldering:

Temperature controlled irons are usually best. Uncontrolled irons
with physically (and therefore) thermally large tips will rest at
well above soldering temperature and then dump energy to a small cold
component leg very quickly. Overheating is fairly likely if you are
not experienced.

1.    Have iron tip clean with usually a single solder point near
tip.
2.    Wipe iron on damp sponge (sea sponge often used. Plastic dies).
3.    Tin tip if required (occasionally) by applying solder lightly
to soldering point.
4.    Apply iron to one side of component "leg".
5.    Allow component leg to heat to soldering temperature.
6.    Apply solder to opposite side of component leg until it melts
(almost instantly if you've followed 4 & 5) and allow a SMALL amount
of solder to apply to joint.
7.    Leave iron in place for a very slight time to ensure all is at
solder temp and then remove tip.
8.    Do not move joint until solder is set. Too cold a joint or
moving the joint while setting will lead to so called 'dry joints"
which will cause endless trouble. these are easily spotted by colour
and texture. make a few to see what they look like. Leaving iron on
too long will apply excess heat to the component with risk of damage.
Too little solder leads  to a possible bad joint. Too much solder
risks short circuits and makes it hard to be sure of joint quality.

In practice I don't strictly follow steps 4 to 7 - after a few
decades it becomes a continuous process (sort of). heat joint
partially and then feed solder in at iron/component leg junction a
little to improve iron heat transfer, wait a moment then add a little
more solder, wait a while more and remove iron. This is not what the
books say and following steps above is probably a good start.

No doubt there will be numerous PIClisters keen to critique this
technique.

{{Solder shields down}}

{Original Message removed}

1998\09\04@030254 by Dennis Plunkett

flavicon
face
At 12:53 PM 4/09/98 +1200, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

1998\09\04@063303 by Caisson

flavicon
face
> Van: John Hansen <EraseMEhansenspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTFREDONIA.EDU>
> Aan: PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Onderwerp: Re: 25 watts
> Datum: donderdag 3 september 1998 14:46
>
> At 07:25 AM 9/3/98 -0400, you wrote:
> >I'm ready for my first PIC application and am worried about my 25 watt
> >sodering iron frying it. Is the PIC that sensative to heat? Is glue a
> >better alternatie?

If I'm not mistaken, those chips are _made_ to be soldered by Wave or
Reflow machines.  There the chips get quite hot.  Your soldering-iron does
not really pose a problem.  How do you think OTP's are placed ?  I would
not (really) worry.

Greetz,
 Rudy Wieser

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...