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'16F84 PC boards ideas?'
1999\03\24@134950 by Mark Willis

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For one project I'm doing, we have 3 16F84's on plug-in boards (or
that's the idea, anyways.)  I can use 16 pin sockets and either give
them a keying pin, or feed clock oscillator in through that pin
(undecided yet.)  Small embedded system, have to have 2 PCB's stacked so
we can make things fit on the "motherboard".  Volume of the whole thing
is around 3.5" x 1.5" x 1", give or take a little.

 Has anyone made any sort of "standard" plug-in "F84 on a card" yet?
(Part of the reason I'm planning to unplug the cards is that they can be
more easily programmed when unplugged, part is that if I'm going to have
to unplug something, might as well be the F84's.  Some computer-savvy
but non-electronics people would be using these, the F84's are harder to
hurt than other parts in the circuit!)

 Commoning Vcc, Gnd, !MClr, RB.6 and RB.7 between the 3 F84's when
plugged in, with 1k pull-ups on RB.6 and .7 for I2C, is the plan here.
Don't think I want to try to program all 3 F84's in parallel, so
unplugging instead of ICSP is a good idea here <G>

 I'm thinking maybe a straight 16-pin IDC connector would work, if the
"motherboard" is double-sided (which is fine, we'll be making a medium
number of these, probably 100ish.)

 Better thoughts, anyone?

 Mark

1999\03\25@002014 by Ravi Pailoor

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I have made a plugin card for 18 pin and 28 pin pic's.
The oscillator and the reset circuit is on board. The supply and the i/o
lines are brought out on to a single in line connector. I use it all the
time for prototyping.

If you need, I can send you the circuit and pc board layout.

Pailoor

Mark Willis wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
================================================
For Embedded Controls Solutions and Custom Designs
------------------------------------------------------------------------
CHIP TECHNOLOGIES - Member, Microchip Consultant Program
Bangalore
INDIA
Email   : spam_OUTchiptechTakeThisOuTspamvsnl.com
Webpage : http://business.vsnl.com/chiptech ( updated 16th Feb 1999 )
================================================

1999\03\25@003300 by Ross

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Please send me copy of your circuit and pc board layout.




//Ross


(HANWE)

----------
: From: Ravi Pailoor <.....chiptechKILLspamspam@spam@VSNL.COM>
: To: PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
: Subject: Re: 16F84 PC boards ideas?
: Date: Wednesday, March 24, 1999 9:03 PM
:
: I have made a plugin card for 18 pin and 28 pin pic's.
: The oscillator and the reset circuit is on board. The supply and
the i/o
: lines are brought out on to a single in line connector. I use it
all the
: time for prototyping.
:
: If you need, I can send you the circuit and pc board layout.
:
: Pailoor
:
: Mark Willis wrote:
:
: > For one project I'm doing, we have 3 16F84's on plug-in boards
(or
: > that's the idea, anyways.)  I can use 16 pin sockets and either
give
: > them a keying pin, or feed clock oscillator in through that pin
: > (undecided yet.)  Small embedded system, have to have 2 PCB's
stacked so
: > we can make things fit on the "motherboard".  Volume of the whole
thing
: > is around 3.5" x 1.5" x 1", give or take a little.
: >
: >   Has anyone made any sort of "standard" plug-in "F84 on a card"
yet?
: > (Part of the reason I'm planning to unplug the cards is that they
can be
: > more easily programmed when unplugged, part is that if I'm going
to have
: > to unplug something, might as well be the F84's.  Some
computer-savvy
: > but non-electronics people would be using these, the F84's are
harder to
: > hurt than other parts in the circuit!)
: >
: >   Commoning Vcc, Gnd, !MClr, RB.6 and RB.7 between the 3 F84's
when
: > plugged in, with 1k pull-ups on RB.6 and .7 for I2C, is the plan
here.
: > Don't think I want to try to program all 3 F84's in parallel, so
: > unplugging instead of ICSP is a good idea here <G>
: >
: >   I'm thinking maybe a straight 16-pin IDC connector would work,
if the
: > "motherboard" is double-sided (which is fine, we'll be making a
medium
: > number of these, probably 100ish.)
: >
: >   Better thoughts, anyone?
: >
: >   Mark
:
: --
: ================================================
: For Embedded Controls Solutions and Custom Designs
:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
--
: CHIP TECHNOLOGIES - Member, Microchip Consultant Program
: Bangalore
: INDIA
: Email   : .....chiptechKILLspamspam.....vsnl.com
: Webpage : http://business.vsnl.com/chiptech ( updated 16th Feb 1999
)
: ================================================

1999\03\25@040718 by Ross Bencina

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Mark Willis wrote:

>For one project I'm doing, we have 3 16F84's on plug-in boards
[snip]
>
>  Has anyone made any sort of "standard" plug-in "F84 on a card" yet?


See simmstick at:

http://www.dontronics.com

Ross.

1999\03\25@053947 by Mark Willis
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Ross Bencina wrote:
> Mark Willis wrote:
> >For one project I'm doing, we have 3 16F84's on plug-in boards
> [snip]
> >we can make things fit on the "motherboard".  Volume of the whole thing
> >is around 3.5" x 1.5" x 1", give or take a little.
> [snip]
> >  Has anyone made any sort of "standard" plug-in "F84 on a card" yet?
>
> See simmstick at:
>
> http://www.dontronics.com
>
> Ross.

 Knew about those, thanks;  What I need is to stick 3 PIC chips, plus
many other parts, all in that 3.5" x 1.5 x 1" volume.  Cannot enlarge
the volume (chording keyboard - larger it is, fewer peoples' hands it'll
fit.)

 A simmstick is 3.5" long (maxes me out on the one dimension already),
1.025" tall (pushing the 1" height already, even at a 45 degree angle),
and 3 of them would eat most of the 1.5" wide board space I will be
needing for the rest of the components in here.  Good for other
projects, not "it" for this unusual application though.

 What I've been thinking of, so far, is having 3 identical chips on
PCB's (Looks like they'll be about 1" wide by .75" tall, PIC soldered in
on top or if we have the height a really LOW profile socket, low profile
xtal or fold it over the top, and a 2mm 18-pin socket (duplicating Power
& Gnd just for size' sake.)  Those're about the cheapest sockets out
there, fit the bill, and I can put a whole BUNCH of these PIC units on
one AP Circuits order (about 61 cents a PC board, if I get about 350) -
I'll have room left over on the motherboard they plug into, if I go this
way.

 Easy enough to just do it this way, I wish there was a 16-pin SIMM
socket, but there isn't <G>

 If there was a "standard" already, I'd love to use it, if not, we'll
fake it <G>

 Mark

1999\03\25@082247 by hmiller

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Ravi Pailoor wrote:
>
> I have made a plugin card for 18 pin and 28 pin pic's.
> The oscillator and the reset circuit is on board. The supply and the i/o
> lines are brought out on to a single in line connector. I use it all the
> time for prototyping.
>
> If you need, I can send you the circuit and pc board layout.
>
> Pailoor
===========================

Pailoor

Please send me a copy of the circiut and pc bd layout. Thank you for
your kind help.

Harley
WB0ROQ

1999\03\28@234308 by Mark Willis

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Followup here:

 Ended up designing a pretty small little board (0.75" x 0.70") that
should do nicely, using a 2mm 16-pin connector.

 I may go up a little in size by the time I finish (I'm trying to
minimize cost of the whole system, so cost of SMD vs. DIL PICs, PCB
holes, SMD vs. through-hole parts, etc. will all have to balance out
here.)  Balancing costs should be interesting <G>

 Think I'll wait on all that until I get some code work done.  Needed
the connector pinout designed, have that now <G>

 Mark

Mark Willis wrote:
> <snipped>
>   Has anyone made any sort of "standard" plug-in "F84 on a card" yet?
> <snipped>


'16F84 PC boards ideas?'
1999\04\13@183449 by John Payson
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|  Commoning Vcc, Gnd, !MClr, RB.6 and RB.7 between the 3 F84's when
|plugged in, with 1k pull-ups on RB.6 and .7 for I2C, is the plan here.
|Don't think I want to try to program all 3 F84's in parallel, so
|unplugging instead of ICSP is a good idea here <G>

If you seperate the RB6 wires if the three chips, you can parallel /MClr,
RB7, VDD and Vss and still be able to ICSP them one at a time.  Given that
this would allow you to avoid the hassles of socketing (and allow you to
use a surface-mount part if desired) this could be a significant win.

Depending upon your programmer design, you may also be able to parallel
the RB6 pins but with, e.g., 470ohm resistors between each chip's RB6
and the I2C bus.  Your bus pull-up would have to be sized appropriately,
of course, but that shouldn't be a problem.  To program one chip, you
would ground out the RB6's of the other two.

Those sound like plausible notions?

1999\04\14@044226 by Mark Willis

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John Payson wrote:
> |  Commoning Vcc, Gnd, !MClr, RB.6 and RB.7 between the 3 F84's when
> |plugged in, with 1k pull-ups on RB.6 and .7 for I2C, is the plan here.
> |Don't think I want to try to program all 3 F84's in parallel, so
> |unplugging instead of ICSP is a good idea here <G>
>
> If you seperate the RB6 wires if the three chips, you can parallel /MClr,
> RB7, VDD and Vss and still be able to ICSP them one at a time.  Given that
> this would allow you to avoid the hassles of socketing (and allow you to
> use a surface-mount part if desired) this could be a significant win.
>
> Depending upon your programmer design, you may also be able to parallel
> the RB6 pins but with, e.g., 470ohm resistors between each chip's RB6
> and the I2C bus.  Your bus pull-up would have to be sized appropriately,
> of course, but that shouldn't be a problem.  To program one chip, you
> would ground out the RB6's of the other two.
>
> Those sound like plausible notions?

 Hmmm.  If I do the second, I could just use IDC headers soldered to
each PC Board, for board-to-board interconnects on final versions, which
might be cheap/handy (I'm planning to use the little chip-boards all
over, just a HANDY way to do this!)  Good, devious thinking!

 Don't think the first is as desireable, for the chording keyboard, but
maybe I can re-design it (Not much coding done lately, I seem to spend a
lotta time handling e-mail <G>)  Hmmm, actually, knowing this perhaps I
should do some minor re-design work...

 Putting the processor on a drop-in board is sort of a standard thing I
do, so I can mail a replacement part to someone elsewhere & the "Joe
Ten-Thumbs" non-technician there can plug it in without breaking
anything.  I hope.  Always polarize the board, usually seal/encapsulate
it so ESD isn't a problem, and so on.  Costs a little, but pays in not
having to drive from Seattle to Portland or Spokane, weekly.  My stuff's
usually small embedded systems, not huge run production stuff, so socket
costs aren't too bad compared to costs of visiting customer site
weekly!  On the keyboard, it'd be better to just use a header, good
thoughts.

 Nice to learn this neat trick!  {that I can pull /MClr to Vpp and hold
RB6 low and safely program another F84 without affecting the local
F84.}  That's news to me.  Good news, too.

 I'll have to figure out what programmer design we'll be using on that
- Have PICStart Plus, Needham's EMP-20, and Parallax programmer here.
Thought of building something really simple into the board to program
F84's off a serial port, for that chording keyboard.  (Lessee, with a
470 ohm in series, for I^2C, what *would* I use for the pull-up?  Hmmm
<G>)  At least the 5VDC is pretty strong on this one (PS/2 keyboard
power plug-in.)  So much to do <G>

 Thanks for the Good ideas!

 Mark

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