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'16C84 - Headup display'
1997\06\12@080809 by Geoff Wootton

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Hi,

  I'm building a 16C84 based device that uses a headup display and
want to detect the blinking of an eye for input. One method may be to
use a minature LED and photosensor to detect the difference in reflection
as the eye blinks. Has anyone any ideas on the best approach to this
problem - I'd prefer a method that didn't make me blind, if possible.

             Geoff.

1997\06\12@104747 by SHAWN ELLIS

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> Hi,
>
>    I'm building a 16C84 based device that uses a headup display and
> want to detect the blinking of an eye for input. One method may be to
> use a minature LED and photosensor to detect the difference in reflection
> as the eye blinks. Has anyone any ideas on the best approach to this
> problem - I'd prefer a method that didn't make me blind, if possible.
>
Yeah, I think a remote-control class IR LED and photosensor should
work.  If you doupt it, just aim your TV remote at your eye, at arm's
length, then face your TV.  WHen your eye is closed, the remote
doesn't work!  When your eye is open, it does!  Gofigure..  I just
tried this with my TV and it seems to know the difference!

Shawn Ellis

1997\06\12@121110 by Harold Hallikainen

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On Thu, 12 Jun 1997 10:44:41 EST5EDT SHAWN ELLIS <spam_OUTspeTakeThisOuTspamMERC.RX.UGA.EDU>
writes:

>Yeah, I think a remote-control class IR LED and photosensor should
>work.  If you doupt it, just aim your TV remote at your eye, at arm's
>length, then face your TV.  WHen your eye is closed, the remote
>doesn't work!  When your eye is open, it does!  Gofigure..  I just
>tried this with my TV and it seems to know the difference!
>


       Pretty amazing!!!  And how was this discovered?  Bored with TV?
Picked up the remote backwards?
       Anyway... it's pretty neat.  I'm sure it'll impres my wife!


Harold


PS  - Some practical uses...  Turn off the TV when I fall asleep.  Sound
an alarm when I close my eyes while driving...

1997\06\12@122538 by Mike

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>>Yeah, I think a remote-control class IR LED and photosensor should
>>work.  If you doupt it, just aim your TV remote at your eye, at arm's
>>length, then face your TV.  WHen your eye is closed, the remote
>>doesn't work!  When your eye is open, it does!  Gofigure..  I just
>>tried this with my TV and it seems to know the difference!

>        Pretty amazing!!!  And how was this discovered?  Bored with TV?
>Picked up the remote backwards?
>        Anyway... it's pretty neat.  I'm sure it'll impres my wife!
>PS  - Some practical uses...  Turn off the TV when I fall asleep.  Sound
>an alarm when I close my eyes while driving...

How about modulating the beam with an audio subliminal message on the
assumption there could be some 'decoding' by the retina through
and subsidiary neural effects etc

Hey - is the CIA listening ?

Mike in Perth, Not too far from Pine Gap...


Some say there is no magic but, all things begin with thought then it becomes
academic, then some poor slob works out a practical way to implement all that
theory, this is called Engineering - for most people another form of magic.
                                                                      Massen

1997\06\12@135318 by Michael S. Hagberg

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circuit cellar did an article on a eye controlled mouse. issue 59 june 1995.
i don'y recall the sensor, but if you don't have access to the article email
me and i will look it up.

michael


At 01:04 PM 6/12/97 +0100, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1997\06\12@160925 by Glen Benson

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At 01:04 PM 6/12/97 +0100, you wrote:
>Hi,
>
>   I'm building a 16C84 based device that uses a headup display and
>want to detect the blinking of an eye for input. One method may be to
>use a minature LED and photosensor to detect the difference in reflection
>as the eye blinks. Has anyone any ideas on the best approach to this
>problem - I'd prefer a method that didn't make me blind, if possible.
>
>              Geoff.

There was a beyond 2000, or next step (TV show) that showed some cameras
that would focus on what the person was looking at by using and LED to read
the position of the pupil. I think it was kodak or poloroid, maybe you
could get some good ideas from a camera shop. Or you could attach a self
stick electode just to the side of the eye and watch for minisule mussle
changes (not very practicle).

Glen Benson

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