Searching \ for '12V Halogen Dimmer' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/power/batterys.htm?key=12v
Search entire site for: '12V Halogen Dimmer'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'12V Halogen Dimmer'
1998\12\17@231714 by Donald L Burdette

picon face
Sorry this is kind of late, gang, but my e-mail service took a while
to let me know it failed to send it the first time.

Glenville T. Sawyer wrote:

>However, having been in the Theatre lighting / Electrics industry for a
> few years I would advise AGAINST dimming Low volt' Halogens.
> unless a halogen lamp is run at its (normal) - preferred
>operating temperature, you WILL find that the life of the globe / lamp
> is reduced by quite a dramatic amount, these lamps seem ( from
> Practical experience ) to prefer full voltage - to achieve maximum
> lifetime operation within design parameters.

Are you sure the large high-voltage globes you used in theater work have
the same charactistics as the miniature low voltage ones being talked
about here?

The reason I ask is that our local home goods/hardware store sells low
voltage halogen kits with dimmers.  Are they selling a product that
damages itself, or is something different about them?  I have no idea
whether they are or not, does anyone out there know?  One thing I was
able to see from the packaging is that the dimmer goes between the mains
and the transformer.

Don Burdette
spam_OUTdlburdetteTakeThisOuTspamjuno.com

1998\12\21@223305 by Mark Willis

flavicon
face
Donald L Burdette wrote:
> <snipped>
> Are you sure the large high-voltage globes you used in theater work have
> the same charactistics as the miniature low voltage ones being talked
> about here?
> <snipped>
> Don Burdette
> .....dlburdetteKILLspamspam@spam@juno.com

 At least SEMI-on topic here, I rigged the girlfriends' apartment
living room with a pair of 300W halogen lamps with X-10 dimmers, a few
years ago;  we could then dim them down to 5% or so (nearly out,
nightlight brightness) at night, and run them up gradually to 75% or so
brightness during the day (or to 100% if we needed to do impromptu
surgery or whatever <G>)  (Haven't done that yet at the house here.)

 My experience with those 117VAC lamps (15mm dia by ?100mm? long or so)
was that they had very very nicely long lifespans, run this way.

 My guess is that, as long as you run them good & hot occasionally,
it's not a problem - and not "slamming" them full on on startup, reduces
thermal shock & lengthens their lifetime.  Sure seemed to work for her
living room, about 2-3 years filament life, better than I've seen with
less-frequent, just straight ON/OFF switching in my place.

 Mark, mwillisspamKILLspamnwlink.com

1998\12\22@015744 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
Anybody know anything about "other" lamp technologies, specifically the
high-brightness halide lamps?  There are some nice (and $$$) lamps at
http://www.microsun.com, but they're talking full lamps, not "just electronics
and bulbs."  I'd be well on my way to redoing most of the house in
"more-efficient-than-filament" lamps if there was something moderately
easy to use that was brighter (and preferrables smaller) than the 100-150W
equivilent compact fluorescents...

BillW

1998\12\22@163234 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Mon, 21 Dec 1998, William Chops Westfield wrote:

> Anybody know anything about "other" lamp technologies, specifically the
> high-brightness halide lamps?  There are some nice (and $$$) lamps at
> http://www.microsun.com, but they're talking full lamps, not "just electronics
> and bulbs."  I'd be well on my way to redoing most of the house in
> "more-efficient-than-filament" lamps if there was something moderately
> easy to use that was brighter (and preferrables smaller) than the 100-150W
> equivilent compact fluorescents...

Most high efficiency lamps (metal halide fluorescent or luminiscent) have
a spectrum problem, i.e. they do not reproduce white correctly, an the
cannot be dimmed easily.

If you really want to spend some money, examine the cold cathode
fluorescent lamps used by LCD projectors. These give excellent white but
require a special SMPSU for drive and can cost $200 and up for a single
replacement bulb. Powers up to 500W per bulb can be obtained I think.

Peter

1998\12\23@152242 by Adriano De Minicis

flavicon
face
> Anybody know anything about "other" lamp technologies

Check "Don Klipstein's Lighting Info Site"
(lots of info about lamps, LEDs, laser FAQ, etc.)
http://www.misty.com/~don/

Adriano

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...