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'[ee] Embedded cellphone module?'
2006\10\16@180014 by Harold Hallikainen

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I have an application where an embedded cellphone module would be useful.
I'd like something that does low speed serial data (14.4kbps or so) over a
national (US) cellular network. Data would be exchanged infrequently (once
a week to once a month). Does anyone know of such a module and what sort
of arrangements can be made with cellular companies to do such data
exchanges at off peak times, ideally only paying for data exchanged
instead of a "per unit" cost?

THANKS!

Harold


--
FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2006\10\16@181946 by Tamas Rudnai

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www.google.ie/search?hl=en&q=gsm+module+embedded&btnG=Search&meta=


On 16/10/06, Harold Hallikainen <spam_OUTharoldTakeThisOuTspamhallikainen.org> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\10\16@182351 by Jason

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This sounds like what you're looking for:
http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=757

For service, you just activate a cell account with GSM service and plug your
SIM card into the module.  You don't make any special arrangements with the
cell company, you put it on whatever plan you want.  I'd recommend a
pre-paid plan; it's usually something like $25 every 3 months for up to 100
minutes.

I have never used this module though.

{Original Message removed}

2006\10\16@182436 by peter green

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> I have an application where an embedded cellphone module would be useful.
> I'd like something that does low speed serial data (14.4kbps or so) over a
> national (US) cellular network.
standard GSM data is only 9.6Kbps, beyond that you are into GRPS and HSCSD
(i don't know what the situation is on the USAs non-gsm networks).

> Data would be exchanged infrequently (once
> a week to once a month). Does anyone know of such a module
sparkfun have one, its rather pricey though (presumablly because of low
volume production)

> and what sort
> of arrangements can be made with cellular companies to do such data
> exchanges at off peak times, ideally only paying for data exchanged
> instead of a "per unit" cost?
i'd imagine unless you are very high volume you are unlikely to get any
special treatment.

if you were here in the uk i'd just tell you to buy pay as you go sim cards
but i hear the ones in the US have terms that make them very unfriendly to
light use.

multiple phone subscription plans may also be worth looking into.

2006\10\16@183506 by alan smith

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I knew I saved stuff for a reason.......this may help you, if the OP found a solution....
 
 from the saved file folder......this was posted by Douglas Wood...not me
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Cellular modems of the type you are speaking about require a service
provider. These types of cellular modems work by using a Mobile
Indentification Number (MIN), the modem's ten digit phone number.
There are specific ranges of these MINs owned by companies (such as
Cellemetry); your modem gets assigned one of these MINs. The service
provider then watches the mobile backbone (called AMPS) for MINs in
their ranges. When a MIN is detected, the service provider pulls the
MIN (and ESN) from the AMPS system and passes it along to you (at a
cost of about $0.05 per packet).

There is no reason why you couldn't put another device's ESN in the
cellular modem's data packet, but since the modem is uniquely
identified by its MIN, doing so would be a waste of time/space.

A word of warning: If you DO decide to use this type of modem, keep in
mind that if you transmit too often (Cellemetry modems use only the
control channel; MicroBurst modems use the control channel AND tie up
a voice channel, although they do not send any data over the voice
channel) your MIN will end up in "MIN Jail". Your MIN will then be
prohibited from send any data packets on the AMPS system for up to 24
hours. This is how AMPS prevents fraudulent use of MINs.

Douglas Wood

{Original Message removed}

2006\10\16@185018 by Bob Axtell

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Harold Hallikainen wrote:
> I have an application where an embedded cellphone module would be useful.
> I'd like something that does low speed serial data (14.4kbps or so) over a
> national (US) cellular network. Data would be exchanged infrequently (once
> a week to once a month). Does anyone know of such a module and what sort
> of arrangements can be made with cellular companies to do such data
> exchanges at off peak times, ideally only paying for data exchanged
> instead of a "per unit" cost?
>
> THANKS!
>
> Harold
>
>
>  
Talk to Verizon, they have the most advanced network. But the modules
allowed are limited.
Google "cellphone modems" and ask the one you like if he works with
Verizon. 18 months
ago the lease rate ran about $100/mo. Can drop data right into an email
account or FTP account.

Warning: the neatest, least expensive modems are not quite compatible
with US / CA cellphone
networks, and are allowed only on an "experimental" basis.

--Bob

2006\10\16@185452 by Bob Axtell

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Wow! 18 months was a long time, this is very nifty. Sounds like fun! It
doesn't
indicate that it ties into a PPP account, though...

--Bob

Jason wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2006\10\16@190639 by Jason

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As I understand it, it just gives you the link, you'd have to have something
to dial to.  For a PPP account, you'd have to connect to a dial-up ISP and
implement the protocol outside this GSM module.

Like I said, I've never used it, so I'm not 100% sure about this.

Jason

From: "Bob Axtell" <.....engineerKILLspamspam@spam@neomailbox.com>
Sent: Monday, October 16, 2006 3:52 PM


> Wow! 18 months was a long time, this is very nifty. Sounds like fun! It
> doesn't
> indicate that it ties into a PPP account, though...
>
> --Bob


2006\10\16@191331 by peter green

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> Wow! 18 months was a long time, this is very nifty. Sounds like fun! It
> doesn't
> indicate that it ties into a PPP account, though...
you'd have to check the datasheet but i'd be very surprised if there wasn't
a way to make it dial up an ISP.


2006\10\16@192253 by Zik Saleeba

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Usually your telco provider acts as an ISP for GSM phones. They'd
probably be the first place I'd try since you're already paying for
the service.

Cheers,
Zik

On 10/17/06, peter green <plugwashspamKILLspamp10link.net> wrote:
>
> > Wow! 18 months was a long time, this is very nifty. Sounds like fun! It
> > doesn't
> > indicate that it ties into a PPP account, though...
> you'd have to check the datasheet but i'd be very surprised if there wasn't
> a way to make it dial up an ISP.
>
>
> -

2006\10\16@192833 by Tim

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Cingular will let you sign up for service and just give you a SIM
card. They also have some recommended modules, primarily from Nokia.
You pay a flat fee per month that comes with a minimum amount of time
or you can pay so much per minute similar to a regular call.

You have the option of doing as you say by calling a modem or they
have information on how to send your data packaged in SMS messages
which are relayed by them to your computer over the Internet.

I spoke with the Sparkfun people mentioned elsewhere and they claim a
SIM card from Cingular will work in one of their Telit modules.

Our project did not go forward because of the cost. Even quoting
several thousand numbers Cingular's price was not low enough and none
of the other US companies had good coverage in the areas we needed.
Instead we used Zigbee modules to link from our equipment to an inside
location where we piggybacked off existing telephone circuits.

Tim


Harold Hallikainen wrote:
> I have an application where an embedded cellphone module would be useful.
> I'd like something that does low speed serial data (14.4kbps or so) over a
> national (US) cellular network. Data would be exchanged infrequently (once
> a week to once a month). Does anyone know of such a module and what sort
> of arrangements can be made with cellular companies to do such data
> exchanges at off peak times, ideally only paying for data exchanged
> instead of a "per unit" cost?

2006\10\16@214503 by Nate Duehr

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I don't know about "modules" for embedded projects, but my Sony GC-79
card works great with any GSM SIM card I've put in it that had "data"
service turned on by the carrier.

It's interface to the host machine (usually a PC, but... perhaps someone
enterprising could use it in something else) is PCMCIA.

It also has 802.11b on-board and both cellular and 802.11 can be active
at the same time.  The windows driver/GUI interface the carriers provide
avoids doing this, but driving the card directly under Linux, the
hardware certainly allows it.

Anything that worked with the standard pcmcia-serial drivers on Linux
could talk to the "cellular modem" where you just send some non-standard
"AT" commands to connect/disconnect from the cellular network's built-in
ISP service via PPP, and the 802.11 was a standard Broadcom chipset
802.11 card.

I think they have a later version out now that changed to higher-speed
802.11g support for the WiFi side of the card.  The newer version of the
card (this one's not available anymore) also was EDGE-capable for higher
speeds on the cellular network.

Nate

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