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'[ee]: Solenoids, is there a way to calc their powe'
2000\10\06@110358 by rad0

picon face
Hello Sports Fans,

I was wondering if modern science yet knows
of a way to calculate the strength of a solenoid's
pulling/pushing force, by number of winds, or
diameter of wire, or current applied or voltage
etc

Is this possible?

Thanks Sports Fans!

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2000\10\06@124815 by Simon Nield

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F = BIL
where F is the force in Newtons
B is the magnetic field measured in... um...Newtons per amp-meter (yes that's probably cheating)
I is the current in amps
L is the length in meters of wire in the field

this assumes that the wire is at right angles to the field (which it will be), that the magnetic
field is constant (which it won't be, pretty sure a solenoid will use a long coil in a short gap,
but it should not be too far wrong)
probably assumes some other stuff too but I can't think of anything useful right now.

stuff that becomes apparent from the above:
more current means more force, until the wire burns out of you demagnetise the permanent magnet.
longer wire means more force, but to fit more wire in you will need to use thinner wire which will
mean lower current rating... not a great way to change to force of a solenoid, unless you feel like
winding a solenoid with rectangular section wire, which will give you a nice packing ratio...

Should give you a start anyway... if nothing else then try searching for that equation ;)

Regards,
Simon

p.s. have a happy w/e everyone. friday at last!

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2000\10\07@092404 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
I don't know how modern this science is, but what you asked for depends on
the following items:

- the exact geometry of the winding, not just coil wire diameter.
- current through windings
- exact structure of the magnetic circuit
- exact shape of the magnetic field density over the entire volume of the
armature
- exact magnetic permeability of the armature
- exact position of the armature inside the solenoid.

I hope that I did not leave anything out. If you are good about computer
simulation then you can make a reasonably accurate model of a solenoid
with partially inserted core and obtain some reasonably accurate numbers.

The only way I know to do this is to buy the solenoid with a datasheet (or
find a datasheet for what you have).

Peter

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2000\10\07@114151 by Scott Stephens

picon face
>Hello Sports Fans,


Do violent video games count :-)

>I was wondering if modern science yet knows
>of a way to calculate the strength of a solenoid's
>pulling/pushing force, by number of winds, or
>diameter of wire, or current applied or voltage
>etc
>
>Is this possible?


Yes. If you do a web search for coil gun you may find what your are looking
for.


Scott

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