Searching \ for '[TECH]Keeping Solar panels cool' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=keeping+solar+panels
Search entire site for: 'Keeping Solar panels cool'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[TECH]Keeping Solar panels cool'
2009\01\21@235325 by cdb

flavicon
face
This might not be tech but OT, anyhow, i was mulling over my
brilliant idea for an electronic gel controlled butter dish
(seriously), when i thought about solar panels.

As their efficiency drops as they get hot - a bit of a paradox really
seeing as what cause them to get hot. Anyhoooo it got me wondering if
anyone had tried commercially cooling solar panels to maintain output.
Perhaps by pumping evaporative coolant, or have a waterfall run over
them - hmm that probably wouldn't do much for solaristion uptake.

Colin
--
cdb,   22/01/2009

--




spam_OUTcolinTakeThisOuTspambtech-online.co.uk

2009\01\22@063414 by apptech

face
flavicon
face
> This might not be tech but OT, anyhow, i was mulling over my
> brilliant idea for an electronic gel controlled butter dish
> (seriously), when i thought about solar panels.
>
> As their efficiency drops as they get hot - a bit of a paradox really
> seeing as what cause them to get hot. Anyhoooo it got me wondering if
> anyone had tried commercially cooling solar panels to maintain output.
> Perhaps by pumping evaporative coolant, or have a waterfall run over
> them - hmm that probably wouldn't do much for solaristion uptake.


I have found that running enough water over the front surface to keep the
surface always covered by a very thin film produced a significant increase
in power output due to cooling.
In situations where you had a moderate amount of water available this may be
viable.
It does show that cooling by some means really works.
(Tried on 50 Watt Glass/EVA/Silicon standard pane;.)

It's EE actually, but TECH is fine.



      Russell

2009\01\22@143726 by Jonathan Hallameyer

picon face
I know front side would be better since thats where the junction is,
but perhaps if the cooling water were on the back there could be a
hybrid photovoltaic/solar thermal hot water system for a house?

Or even use the hot water to power a small sterling engine to power a
fan blowing over a radiator in a cooling loop, and make the cooling of
the solar cells self sustaining.

On 1/22/09, apptech <.....apptechKILLspamspam@spam@paradise.net.nz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2009\01\22@152045 by Tony Vandiver

flavicon
face
This didn't make sense to me at first, but in using a thermocouple
generator with a heat source on one side, the energy output increased by
blowing air over the heat sink on the cooling side.  That part made
sense, but I didn't believe that it could be self-sustaining, in other
words, I didn't think you could get more power out of the system if you
used the generated power to cool the heat sink on the cooling side, but
I was proven wrong.  It not only produced enough to sustain the fan
power, but provided more power than the system without the fan.  Cool,
huh?  Ever tried just a high efficiency fan even though it might not
seem to make sense?

Thanks,

Tony


Jonathan Hallameyer wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>> --

2009\01\25@001717 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
Hi Tony,

There are no physical laws being broken in your case because you still
cannot cool the cool side to a temperature less than the ambient air.
The fan is just basically making a better heatsink.

Sean


On Thu, Jan 22, 2009 at 3:20 PM, Tony Vandiver
<.....tonyKILLspamspam.....traceelectronics.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2009 , 2010 only
- Today
- New search...