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'[TECH] Talking roads'
2010\08\11@140219 by Vitaliy

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>From a link in the "OBDLink WiFi" topic:

"This topic kind of reminds me of a thing my father was involved with many years ago before I was born - in the early 1950's. Goodyear Aerospace in Arizona (a division of Goodyear Tire and Rubber) made a road (test track) that had many parallel groves cut into it like groves of a record player. After the concrete road was poured, a big machine with many little grove making wires trailing behind it would go over the wet concrete and make many little parallel cuts in the concrete effectively making a "record track" for tires that traveled over it. The reason my father was involved was that he had a very low frequency loud voice that was perfect for recording messages that were to be sent to drivers driving over this road. When someone would drive over this road, their tires would act like the needle of a record player and would vibrate in time with my father's voice that was scratched into the concrete sections of this road. There were simple test messages in the road like: "Stop ahead" and "Speed Limit 30 Miles Per Hour" and "You are driving off the road!" and "Wrong Way" that made no sense when driven over backwards. Goodyear tested it for many years and found out that: 1. It startled drivers way too much - (The GOD thing). 2. It caused tires (of the time) to have less traction in wet weather conditions causing skidding. 3. Induced vibration in cars that led to skidding. With all of these reasons, Goodyear abandoned the project in the 60's but the test track still exists somewhere near Phoenix Arizona as I vaguely remember my father driving my family around the thing when I was but a wee little kid. I remember his voice coming from the tires - very loudly and clearly I might add - with a slight echo in it because the front tire would play the track just ahead of the back tire - making it sound very GOD like and kind of spooky.
-hosehead, Aug 08 2002
"

Does anyone know whether the track still exists? I live in Phoenix and never heard of it, but it's just way too cool!

Vitaliy

2010\08\11@144428 by Carl Denk

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www.ci.goodyear.az.us/

Looks like it is a Scottsdale west suburb.

On 8/11/2010 2:00 PM, Vitaliy wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2010\08\11@165920 by Olin Lathrop

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Vitaliy wrote:
> Does anyone know whether the track still exists? I live in Phoenix
> and never heard of it, but it's just way too cool!

This is the first I heard of Goodyear doing this in Phoenix.  Much more
recently a Japanese car company (Toyota?) cut grooves in a road in
Kentucky(?) such that it played a tune.  I've seen a video of that one, but
never of one with a voice recording.


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2010\08\11@170744 by Herbert Graf

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On Wed, 2010-08-11 at 16:59 -0400, Olin Lathrop wrote:
> Vitaliy wrote:
> > Does anyone know whether the track still exists? I live in Phoenix
> > and never heard of it, but it's just way too cool!
>
> This is the first I heard of Goodyear doing this in Phoenix.  Much more
> recently a Japanese car company (Toyota?) cut grooves in a road in
> Kentucky(?) such that it played a tune.  I've seen a video of that one, but
> never of one with a voice recording.

Cool, the tune ones are called "melody roads":

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2007/nov/13/japan.gadgets

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTsoP3WWgU4

2010\08\11@182911 by Vitaliy

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Herbert Graf wrote:
>> > Does anyone know whether the track still exists? I live in Phoenix
>> > and never heard of it, but it's just way too cool!
>>
>> This is the first I heard of Goodyear doing this in Phoenix.  Much more
>> recently a Japanese car company (Toyota?) cut grooves in a road in
>> Kentucky(?) such that it played a tune.  I've seen a video of that one,
>> but
>> never of one with a voice recording.
>
> Cool, the tune ones are called "melody roads":
>
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2007/nov/13/japan.gadgets
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTsoP3WWgU4
>

This technique is different from the one described in the original post. The Japanese cut the grooves perpendicular to the line of travel, and the spacing b/w the grooves is what creates the different notes. There is no way to encode amplitude, only pitch.

If the "talking track" really existed, it makes sense that they used grooves parallel to the direction of travel: you can encode both the pitch and the amplitude.

This reminds me of the difference between a regular microphone and a "pin" microphone, which is suitable for transmitting music but not voice.

Vitaliy

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