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'[TECH] Pressing buttons on cell phone or digital c'
2010\08\11@134144 by Jonathan Hallameyer

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On Wed, Aug 11, 2010 at 1:02 PM, YES NOPE9 <spam_OUTyesTakeThisOuTspamnope9.com> wrote:

> I want to be able to robotically press buttons on a cell phone.
> This means the throw of the button press will not be more than 5mm.
> I have seen mention of buttons requiring 21 pounds of pressure.  So
> far intergoogling has not revealed consistent data.
> I want a solution that costs ~$2 per pressor. ( I can dream )
>
> One thing I am considering is some kind of doo-hickey using nitinol
> wire.
> Any suggestions or sources of button pressors ?
>
> Gus
>
>
Where did you see 21 lbs of pressure was needed? a quick experiment with my
cell phone and a bottle with ~ 8 fl-oz of water in it say otherwise :o)
Also, how fast are you trying to push the same button?  Since you mention
nitinol I'd imagine not too fast.   While I dont know the price per foot of
nitinol wire, that actually doesnt sound like that bad of a solution, just a
~10-15mm thick piece of aluminum or heat resistant plastic, with pegs over
each key, and a piece of nitinol strung over each peg.   Guessing taking
apart the cell phone and using strictly electrical means isnt an option?
Perhaps with a spring for some pre-load something like a relay could
be hacked as an actuator.

Or just cheap surplus solenoids like I just found
http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G16036

I suspect 3.7 lbs should be enough, but even if its not, a solenoid with
that much throw could have inertia to help it out some too.

Jonathan Hallameye

2010\08\11@135416 by Mark Rages

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On Wed, Aug 11, 2010 at 12:02 PM, YES NOPE9 <.....yesKILLspamspam@spam@nope9.com> wrote:
> I want to be able to robotically press buttons on a cell phone.
> This means the throw of the button press will not be more than 5mm.
> I have seen mention of buttons requiring 21 pounds of pressure.  So
> far intergoogling has not revealed consistent data.
> I want a solution that costs ~$2 per pressor. ( I can dream )
>
> One thing I am considering is some kind of doo-hickey using nitinol
> wire.
> Any suggestions or sources of button pressors ?
>

I did cell phone design for a while.  The production keypad test was
an array of air cylinders.

21 lbs sounds extremely high.

Regards,
Mark
markrages@gmail
-- Mark Rages, Engineer
Midwest Telecine LLC
markragesspamKILLspammidwesttelecine.com

2010\08\11@145006 by Alex Harford

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On Wed, Aug 11, 2010 at 10:02 AM, YES NOPE9 <.....yesKILLspamspam.....nope9.com> wrote:
> I want to be able to robotically press buttons on a cell phone.
> This means the throw of the button press will not be more than 5mm.
> I have seen mention of buttons requiring 21 pounds of pressure.  So
> far intergoogling has not revealed consistent data.
> I want a solution that costs ~$2 per pressor. ( I can dream )

Does the phone need to be intact, ie can you take the phone apart and
solder wires to the contacts?
Do you want to have it work for a variety of models?
Do you want to be able to press multiple buttons simultaneously?  I'm
wondering if you could repurpose a couple of scanners or printers to
move a single pressor in the X/Y axis.  For a phone with a qwery
keyboard, I'm guessing there are around 40 buttons. That gives you a
budget of $80. :)

It might be easier to get a phone with a bluetooth or serial interface
and have it dial the number for you. :)
http://wiki.forum.nokia.com/index.php/AT_Commands

For a digital camera, check out the CHDK http://chdk.wikia.com, again
you might be able to do whatever you need to do via a data interface.

2010\08\12@064910 by alan.b.pearce

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> > I want to be able to robotically press buttons on a cell phone.
> > This means the throw of the button press will not be more than 5mm.
> > I have seen mention of buttons requiring 21 pounds of pressure.  So
> > far intergoogling has not revealed consistent data.
> > I want a solution that costs ~$2 per pressor. ( I can dream )
> >
> > One thing I am considering is some kind of doo-hickey using nitinol
> > wire.
> > Any suggestions or sources of button pressors ?
> >
> > Gus

Are you wanting to production line test the keyboard? Or are you wanting to do some other communication thing?

I would have thought the easier way would be to go in through a comms
port for the latter.

> I suspect 3.7 lbs should be enough, but even if its not, a solenoid
with
> that much throw could have inertia to help it out some too.

I get the impression the original figure might have been 0.21 lbs.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2010\08\12@101313 by BOB

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Jonathan Hallameyer wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Just a note the solenoid pictured is a pull type.

Bo


'[TECH] Pressing buttons on cell phone or digital c'
2011\02\24@143514 by Alex Harford
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On Wed, Aug 11, 2010 at 10:02 AM, YES NOPE9 <yesspamspam_OUTnope9.com> wrote:
> I want to be able to robotically press buttons on a cell phone.

When I saw this article today, it reminded me of this old thread.
http://hackaday.com/2011/02/24/machine-pushes-cellphone-buttons-from-anywhere-in-the-world

Have you made any progress on this project

2011\02\24@170156 by YES NOPE9

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>
> On Feb 24, 2011, at 12:35 PM, Alex Harford wrote:
>
> On Wed, Aug 11, 2010 at 10:02 AM, YES NOPE9 <@spam@yesKILLspamspamnope9.com> wrote:
>> I want to be able to robotically press buttons on a cell phone.
>
> When I saw this article today, it reminded me of this old thread.
> http://hackaday.com/2011/02/24/machine-pushes-cellphone-buttons-from-anywhere-in-the-world

Have you made any progress on this project?
This project is going slowly.....
I am investigating two technologies.
#1   Using nitinol wire to push the button.   Current through the wire ==> Heat ==> wire expands
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel_titanium
#2   Using tiny audio speakers to push a wire in a coax cable shell.  Like the cables used for bicycle brakes.

gus in denver   99gu

2011\02\24@173648 by Olin Lathrop

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YES NOPE9 wrote:
> #1   Using nitinol wire to push the button.   Current through the
>      wire ==> Heat ==> wire expands

There are off the shelf products that do this already.  I vaguely remember
they are called something like "electronic pistons".

> #2   Using tiny audio
> speakers to push a wire in a coax cable shell.  Like the cables used
> for bicycle brakes.

That sounds like quite a kludge.  Why not just a ordinary solenoid?  It is
meant to move a plunger, as apposed to a speaker which is meant to move air..


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2011\02\24@174502 by N. T.

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Olin Lathrop wrote:
> YES NOPE9 wrote:
>> #1   Using nitinol wire to push the button.   Current through the
>>      wire ==> Heat ==> wire expands
>
> There are off the shelf products that do this already.  I vaguely remember
> they are called something like "electronic pistons".
>
>> #2   Using tiny audio
>> speakers to push a wire in a coax cable shell.  Like the cables used
>> for bicycle brakes.
>
> That sounds like quite a kludge.  Why not just a ordinary solenoid?  It is
> meant to move a plunger, as apposed to a speaker which is meant to move air.
>

An FDD step-motor drive can be the option as well.

2011\02\24@175642 by PICdude

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Quoting YES NOPE9 <KILLspamyesKILLspamspamnope9.com>:

> ... to push a wire in a coax cable shell.   Like the cables used for  
> bicycle brakes.

Called flex pushrods in the RC world (used to connect servos to  control surfaces).  Example...
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXK055&P=7

Cheers,
-Neil.

2011\02\24@190938 by John Ferrell

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Radio Control models sometimes use a cam on a standard servo to push a button. Usually the goal there is to totally isolate two separate electrical systems.

John Ferrell W8CCW

'People will forget what you said.

People will forget what you did.'

'But people will never forget how you made them feel.'


On 2/24/2011 2:35 PM, Alex Harford wrote:
> On Wed, Aug 11, 2010 at 10:02 AM, YES NOPE9<RemoveMEyesTakeThisOuTspamnope9.com>  wrote:
>> I want to be able to robotically press buttons on a cell phone.
> When I saw this article today, it reminded me of this old thread.
> http://hackaday.com/2011/02/24/machine-pushes-cellphone-buttons-from-anywhere-in-the-world
>
> Have you made any progress on this project

2011\02\24@215902 by Bob Blick

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On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 19:09 -0500, "John Ferrell" wrote:
> Radio Control models sometimes use a cam on a standard servo to push a
> button. Usually the goal there is to totally isolate two separate
> electrical systems.


If you don't need chording (pressing more than one button at a time) you
can push two buttons alternately with the same servo using two pushrods.

Bob

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - Or how I learned to stop worrying and
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