Searching \ for '[TECH] I am looking for quality 18650 LION batter' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=looking+quality
Search entire site for: 'I am looking for quality 18650 LION batter'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[TECH] I am looking for quality 18650 LION batter'
2011\01\07@193010 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
I am refurbishing my 450ROG Gateway laptop battery pack.
It requires #18650 LION batteries and I would like to pay
a low price while avoiding crappy , counterfeit batteries.
Any suggestions ?

Gus in Denver    99gu

2011\01\08@035935 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 08/01/2011 00:30, YES NOPE9 wrote:
> I am refurbishing my 450ROG Gateway laptop battery pack.
> It requires #18650 LION batteries and I would like to pay
> a low price while avoiding crappy , counterfeit batteries.
> Any suggestions ?
>
> Gus in Denver    99gus
And the battery pack works if you swap in new batteries?
Most don't
Most you need to reprogram the controller/reset memory.

2011\01\10@074255 by Michael Rigby-Jones

flavicon
face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: spam_OUTpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam@spam@mit.edu] On
Behalf
{Quote hidden}

FWIW I have rebuilt a number of Dell packs with defective cells (I
obtained a pile of dead batteries from our IT dept. and most only had a
single pair of dead cells) and not had too many problems with resetting
the controller provided I manually charged the cells first (I use a
universal RC Hobby charger).  After replacement I find the first couple
of battery cycles in the notebook give very poor life, but it quickly
gets better as the battery controller learns the new capacity.

Sometimes you simply find the cells are badly imbalanced, and manually
charging them all to the same terminal voltage (whilst they are still in
the pack and connected to the protection circuit) will restore pretty
much full capacity after a few battery charge/discharge cycles.  My own
Dell notebook went from ~1/2hour to 3 1/2 hour life after balancing the
cells.

Regards

Mike

=======================================================================
This e-mail is intended for the person it is addressed to only. The
information contained in it may be confidential and/or protected by
law. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must
not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
person. Please contact us immediately to tell us that you have
received this e-mail, and return the original to us. Any use,
forwarding, printing or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.
No part of this message can be considered a request for goods or
services.
=======================================================================

2011\01\10@075506 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> FWIW I have rebuilt a number of Dell packs with defective cells (I
> obtained a pile of dead batteries from our IT dept. and most only had a
> single pair of dead cells) and not had too many problems with resetting
> the controller provided I manually charged the cells first (I use a
> universal RC Hobby charger).  After replacement I find the first couple
> of battery cycles in the notebook give very poor life, but it quickly
> gets better as the battery controller learns the new capacity.
>
> Sometimes you simply find the cells are badly imbalanced, and manually
> charging them all to the same terminal voltage (whilst they are still in
> the pack and connected to the protection circuit) will restore pretty
> much full capacity after a few battery charge/discharge cycles.  My own
> Dell notebook went from ~1/2hour to 3 1/2 hour life after balancing the
> cells.

I have a Dell battery pack I would like to try this with, but blowed if I can see how to get into it. I think it has been ultrasonic welded around the case join. The symptom is that it will run the laptop for about 10 minutes tops from a "fully charged" state. It has been sitting on my desk now for about a month from its last full charge, and all 5 LEDs will still light, so it doesn't seem to have self discharged in that time.

It's a PT434 Li-Ion from a latitude e6400 series machine (11.1V 56Wh). I got a new larger capacity battery for it, but it would be nice to rejuvenate this one as a backup.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\01\10@095422 by Michael Rigby-Jones

flavicon
face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: piclist-bouncesspamKILLspammit.edu [.....piclist-bouncesKILLspamspam.....mit.edu] On
Behalf
> Of EraseMEalan.b.pearcespam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTstfc.ac.uk
> Sent: 10 January 2011 12:55
> To: piclistspamspam_OUTmit.edu
> Subject: RE: [TECH] I am looking for quality 18650 LION battery
>
> > FWIW I have rebuilt a number of Dell packs with defective cells (I
> > obtained a pile of dead batteries from our IT dept. and most only
had a
> > single pair of dead cells) and not had too many problems with
resetting
> > the controller provided I manually charged the cells first (I use a
> > universal RC Hobby charger).  After replacement I find the first
couple
> > of battery cycles in the notebook give very poor life, but it
quickly
> > gets better as the battery controller learns the new capacity.
> >
> > Sometimes you simply find the cells are badly imbalanced, and
manually
> > charging them all to the same terminal voltage (whilst they are
still in
> > the pack and connected to the protection circuit) will restore
pretty
> > much full capacity after a few battery charge/discharge cycles.  My
own
> > Dell notebook went from ~1/2hour to 3 1/2 hour life after balancing
the
> > cells.
>
> I have a Dell battery pack I would like to try this with, but blowed
if I
> can see how to get into it. I think it has been ultrasonic welded
around
> the case join. The symptom is that it will run the laptop for about 10
> minutes tops from a "fully charged" state. It has been sitting on my
desk
> now for about a month from its last full charge, and all 5 LEDs will
still
> light, so it doesn't seem to have self discharged in that time.
>
> It's a PT434 Li-Ion from a latitude e6400 series machine (11.1V 56Wh).
I
> got a new larger capacity battery for it, but it would be nice to
> rejuvenate this one as a backup.
> --

Some packs seem to come apart with just gentle levering and can be
re-assembled with a few drops of "super glue". Others are pretty much
impossible to disassemble without causing damage to the casing and they
certainly won't look pretty afterwards, but can be made useable.

In the difficult cases I use a sharp knife to score through the case
near the weld/glue line, going round and around the pack and I just
start to break through and then lever the split apart.  Obviously you
have to be very careful not to plunge the knife in too far and cause
damage or short circuits.

Amazingly some of the Apple packs have an alloy cover held on with
screws which are very easy to take apart - in contrast to their actual
laptops, phones and MP3 players which are usually horrible things to
disassemble!

Cheers

Mike

=======================================================================
This e-mail is intended for the person it is addressed to only. The
information contained in it may be confidential and/or protected by
law. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must
not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
person. Please contact us immediately to tell us that you have
received this e-mail, and return the original to us. Any use,
forwarding, printing or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.
No part of this message can be considered a request for goods or
services.
=======================================================================

2011\01\10@131600 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
Dis-assembled battery packs
I have photos of a Gateway 450ROG battery pack and a Dell Inspiron 5100 battery pack.
If anyone wants to see them , I will post them.
Sometimes it helps to peel the info label off the battery pack.
I have mostly used a box cutter to remove parts of the battery pack enclosure.

Someone mentioned they *reset* the controller in their battery pack ..... what did this entail ?
Gus in Denver  99gu

2011\01\18@073940 by cpetito

flavicon
face


alan.b.pearce wrote:
>
>
>
> I have a Dell battery pack I would like to try this with, but blowed if I
> can see how to get into it. I think it has been ultrasonic welded around
> the case join. The symptom is that it will run the laptop for about 10
> minutes tops from a "fully charged" state. It has been sitting on my desk
> now for about a month from its last full charge, and all 5 LEDs will still
> light, so it doesn't seem to have self discharged in that time.
>
> It's a PT434 Li-Ion from a latitude e6400 series machine (11.1V 56Wh). I
> got a new larger capacity battery for it, but it would be nice to
> rejuvenate this one as a backup.
> --
> Scanned by iCritical.
>
> -

2011\01\18@084129 by Michael Watterson

face picon face
On 18/01/2011 12:39, cpetito wrote:
> Very frustrating that everything is so locked down.  And I have no idea how
> the battery gauge algorithm will treat the battery going forward.
>
> Let me know if you want more info, but at this point, in my experience, it
> just doesn't make sense to rebuild this battery pack unless there is a way
> to reset the battery parameters.
this is more or less what I said earlier. Rebuild is last resort if eBay doesn't have a decent priced and quality replacement

2011\01\18@090845 by alan.b.pearce

face picon face
> Alan,
>
> I did the same thing: "got a new larger capacity battery for it, but it
> would be nice to rejuvenate this one as a backup" and I did reload the old
> pack with new cells.
>
> I can tell you how to open the pack - it's not that hard, and I can tell you
> how to replace the cells.

Yes, I did manage to get mine open, without damaging the plastic too badly.

> Anyone have this info for a Dell PT434 battery pack?  Preferably through
> SMBus commands.

I went looking for "dell battery reset" on the web, and it appears there are some programs out there that will access the battery for you while it is in the laptop. One seems to require a simple i2C interface to be built to reset the parameters, but I haven't investigated yet, beyond doing some downloads.

Interestingly the battery appears to have a good set of cells in it. Before I last removed it from the laptop, mid December, I fully charged it. I haven't used it since and the cells are all showing around 4.1V, giving a full pack voltage of 12.3. I would have thought that if there was a serious cell problem that one pair of cells (they are hard wired parallel pairs) would show a dip by now.

I suspect mine may have 'just' got its cycle counter in a twist, as it hasn't done a lot of operation on battery.
-- Scanned by iCritical.

2011\01\18@115331 by cpetito

flavicon
face


alan.b.pearce wrote:
>
> I went looking for "dell battery reset" on the web, and it appears there
> are some programs out there that will access the battery for you while it
> is in the laptop. One seems to require a simple i2C interface to be built
> to reset the parameters, but I haven't investigated yet, beyond doing some
> downloads.
>
Please let me know if you are successful.  Everything I've seen requires
removing the EEPROM to reprogram the parameters.


alan.b.pearce wrote:
>
> Interestingly the battery appears to have a good set of cells in it.
> Before I last removed it from the laptop, mid December, I fully charged
> it. I haven't used it since and the cells are all showing around 4.1V,
> giving a full pack voltage of 12.3. I would have thought that if there was
> a serious cell problem that one pair of cells (they are hard wired
> parallel pairs) would show a dip by now.
> Based on the end of life behavior of my battery pack, I also expected to
find a bad pair of cells, but they all seem to have a lot of life left.  If
I find some time, I want to measure the capacity of the old cells - I expect
that I had to replace the pack before it was really necessary.


-- View this message in context: old.nabble.com/-TECH---I-am-looking-for-quality-18650-LION-battery-tp30619422p30701808.html
Sent from the MicroControllers - PIC mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

2011\01\18@121458 by Bob Blick

face
flavicon
face

On Tue, 18 Jan 2011 08:53:30 -0800 (PST), "cpetito" said:

> Based on the end of life behavior of my battery pack, I also expected to
> find a bad pair of cells, but they all seem to have a lot of life left.
> If
> I find some time, I want to measure the capacity of the old cells - I
> expect
> that I had to replace the pack before it was really necessary.

I have a Dell about four years old. The battery pack has a pushbutton
and five LEDs. Push the button and it shows the state of charge. But if
you continue to hold the button, it shows state of charge for a few
seconds and then the inverse of the predicted capacity. In other words,
a fully healthy battery will show no LEDs. I bought the laptop used
about three years ago and whenever I check it I have always seen one
health LED, about eighty percent health. The battery meter in Ubuntu
said it had a capacity of xx watthours which was about 78 percent of the
rating.

A few weeks ago I was thinking about the battery and whether it was time
to get a new one. But since one usually never runs a battery until flat,
always relying on the laptop to send warnings or go into standby state
when low, I decided to turn all that off and just try a full
discharge/charge cycle to get an idea of the actual condition of the
battery.

The Windows battery meter ticked down normally until about seven
percent. Then it stayed at seven percent for fifty minutes! After that
it went down normally until it shut off.

I let it cool for a couple of hours (I am a battery care nut so I will
not charge a warm battery) and recharged the battery. The health LEDs
now showed zero LEDs, 100 percent health, and Ubuntu's battry meter said
I had more capacity, about 96 percent.

Who knows what the microcontroller inside the battery is programmed to
do, but in my case it learned enough to increase its predicted capacity.
This is a D420 which has prismatic cells rather than cylindrical cells
like the 18650. I don't know if the chip uses radically different
programming for the two types, I doubt it.

Cheerful regards, Bob

-- http://www.fastmail.fm - Faster than the air-speed velocity of an
                         unladen european swallow

2011\01\19@105024 by cpetito

flavicon
face


Bob Blick-4 wrote:
>
> The Windows battery meter ticked down normally until about seven
> percent. Then it stayed at seven percent for fifty minutes! After that
> it went down normally until it shut off.
>
> I let it cool for a couple of hours (I am a battery care nut so I will
> not charge a warm battery) and recharged the battery. The health LEDs
> now showed zero LEDs, 100 percent health, and Ubuntu's battry meter said
> I had more capacity, about 96 percent.
>
Thanks for the additional data point.

Interestingly I stumbled on the drain and recharge suggestion when trying to
get some run time out of the battery pack I rebuilt.

My process consists of running the battery down to about 10%, rebooting the
machine into the BIOS utility, let the battery drain and the laptop shut
down, and then recharge with the laptop off.  Perhaps I should add your cool
down period - but I'm too impatient.

Watching the battery status in the BIOS utility shows the percentage drop
until, like yours, it hits 7% and then it hangs there for a very long time.

Running this process three times has resulted in an increase from about 9 Wh
to about 35 Wh for a 57 Wh rebuilt PT434 pack.

However, the pack LEDs show full capacity (all LEDs) with zero health (all
LEDs) and when I boot, I get a warning that while the battery can charge
normally, it needs to be replaced.


Bob Blick-4 wrote:
>
> Who knows what the microcontroller inside the battery is programmed to
> do, but in my case it learned enough to increase its predicted capacity.
>
I wish I had known about this undocumented battery gauge recalibration.  I'm
pretty sure that I didn't really need to buy a pack - all the cells I
removed seem to have a lot of life left in them.  Perhaps some day I will
take the time to quantify.

I'll probably run the drain and charge again.  It will be interesting to see
if it continues to go up or if the battery gauge algorithm has some hard end
of life parameter.

Regards,
Carl

-- View this message in context: old.nabble.com/-TECH---I-am-looking-for-quality-18650-LION-battery-tp30619422p30711131.html
Sent from the MicroControllers - PIC mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

2011\01\20@082534 by Michael Rigby-Jones

flavicon
face


> -----Original Message-----
> From: @spam@piclist-bouncesKILLspamspammit.edu [KILLspampiclist-bouncesKILLspamspammit.edu] On
Behalf
> Of cpetito
> Sent: 19 January 2011 15:50
> To: RemoveMEpiclistTakeThisOuTspammit.edu
> Subject: RE: [TECH] I am looking for quality 18650 LION battery
>
>
>
> Bob Blick-4 wrote:
> >
> > Who knows what the microcontroller inside the battery is programmed
to
> > do, but in my case it learned enough to increase its predicted
capacity.
> >
>
> I wish I had known about this undocumented battery gauge
recalibration.
> I'm
> pretty sure that I didn't really need to buy a pack - all the cells I
> removed seem to have a lot of life left in them.  Perhaps some day I
will
> take the time to quantify.
>
> I'll probably run the drain and charge again.  It will be interesting
to
> see
> if it continues to go up or if the battery gauge algorithm has some
hard
> end
> of life parameter.
>
> Regards,
> Carl

As I mentioned previously, cell imbalance can cause a very significant
degradation in apparent battery capacity.  The packs have no means of
balancing the cells, they simply terminate charging when one of the
cells reaches the terminal charged voltage (~4.1v usualy) and won't
allow further discharge when one cell reaches the terminal discharge
voltage (~3.6volts or so).

If one cell reaches 4.1volts and another is only at, say, 3.8v then you
have only a tiny fraction of the possible capacity.  This tends to only
get worse with more charge/discharge cycles, but balancing the cells
manually can regain the majority of the "as new" capacity.

Regards

Mike

=======================================================================
This e-mail is intended for the person it is addressed to only. The
information contained in it may be confidential and/or protected by
law. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must
not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
person. Please contact us immediately to tell us that you have
received this e-mail, and return the original to us. Any use,
forwarding, printing or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.
No part of this message can be considered a request for goods or
services.
=======================================================================

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2011 , 2012 only
- Today
- New search...