Searching \ for '[TECH] Correct multi-conductor wire' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=correct+multi+conductor
Search entire site for: 'Correct multi-conductor wire'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[TECH] Correct multi-conductor wire'
2009\07\11@180209 by Steve Maroney

flavicon
face
Can someone point me to some multi-conductor cable that works well with
these header pins and connectors:

http://www.futurlec.com/ConnHead.shtml



Best Regards,
Steve Maroney

Business Computer Support, LLC
Mobile Phone:504-914-4704
Office Phone: 504-904-0266
Fax: 866-871-7797



{Original Message removed}

2009\07\11@183935 by peter green

flavicon
face
Steve Maroney wrote:
> Can someone point me to some multi-conductor cable that works well with
> these header pins and connectors:
>
> http://www.futurlec.com/ConnHead.shtml
>  
I haven't used that particular brand but in general i've found that
style of connector (individually crimped pins) to work fine with
everything i've tried it with.

2009\07\13@191608 by Dwayne Reid

flavicon
face
At 04:00 PM 7/11/2009, Steve Maroney wrote:
>Can someone point me to some multi-conductor cable that works well with
>these header pins and connectors:
>
>http://www.futurlec.com/ConnHead.shtml

I'm assuming that you are talking about the "Header connector" and
"Double Row Header Connector" listings near the bottom the web-page.

Wire can be pretty much anything larger than 24 AWG and smaller than
30 AWG.  You can use jacketed cable (the stuff I use is 24 AWG, gray
PVC jacket over the conductors) or you can use ribbon
cable.  Individual conductors work well also.

Using the proper crimp tool is important if you want the crimps to be
reliable.  You will be shocked at the cost of good crimp tools but
I'm guessing that there are low-cost versions available somewhere.

Otherwise, just use needle-nose pliers to fold the contact wings over
the conductor and solder the pin to the wire.  Then fold the strain
relief wings over the conductor insulation.  Time-consuming, but it works.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <spam_OUTdwaynerTakeThisOuTspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax
http://www.trinity-electronics.com
Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing

2009\07\13@193235 by peter green

flavicon
face

> Using the proper crimp tool is important if you want the crimps to be
> reliable.  You will be shocked at the cost of good crimp tools but
> I'm guessing that there are low-cost versions available somewhere.
>  
There are lots of cheapish tools. Of the ones i've tried my favorite is
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/search/searchBrowseAction.html?method=getProduct&R=2105012&cm_vc=acc_uk#header
. It's designed primerally for molex kk pins but it will do other pins
of a similar size fine and will do bigger stuff at a push if used
deviously. I don't like the ones that do the conductor and sleeve crimp
at the same time because I find they block my view of whether the wire
is in the connector properly.

> Otherwise, just use needle-nose pliers to fold the contact wings over
> the conductor and solder the pin to the wire.  Then fold the strain
> relief wings over the conductor insulation.  Time-consuming, but it works.
>  
Personally i've never found I can get the solder neat enough when doing
this and therefore it causes problems inserting the pin into the connector.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2009 , 2010 only
- Today
- New search...