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'[PICLIST] What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\04@065330 by GB

picon face
Hi,

I think it would be interesting to find out what designs the PIC is capable of, so feel free to add to this, and add a small description!



Personally I have designed and built are:


1) 64 Way cable tester (detects shorts, opens, crossed wires, then displayed faulty wires using LED grid)

2) Lost key beeper (Beeps after 24 hours of none movement)

3) Light that turned on when user stepped on a hidden security mat (transmitted to a lamp via RF and turned the Lamp on)

4) Intelligent battery Display using LCD to display run time of battery


OK its over to you, what novel or bizarre things have you done with PIC?

Thanks Gary

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2002\07\04@195310 by Larry G. Nelson Sr.

picon face
Timer for fireworks shells
Single board computers
X-Ray machine control panel
Alarm system strobe
Talking medical devices
Ultrasonic measurement devices (various
Laser measurement system
Light show controller
DVD display system controller
Handgun controller
Solar power inverter controller
visual relaxation device (medical)
Production test equipment (various)
Speedometer
Tachometer
Electronic signs
... many proprietary systems under NDA

all off the top of my head
Larry

At 11:52 AM 7/4/02 +0100, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Larry G. Nelson Sr.
L.NelsonspamKILLspamieee.org
http://www.ultranet.com/~nr

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2002\07\05@013517 by etorius Johan * Spoornet

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face
1. Complete home alarm system with GSM communications (Nokia 5110) to contol
the alarm and send alarm messages to specified cellphone numbers
2. 4 Input 2output Monitoring device sending SMS messages when triggered.



{Original Message removed}

2002\07\05@032247 by Jinx

face picon face
Current project - finding out in how many ways you can turn an
F877 into a current sink / super-SCR / landfill. Side project -
determining the amount of brain damage said PIC can suffer
and still kinda work

Jinx's place is a House Of Pain for PICs today. Feel sorry for
them. Lifeless, their wee legs in the air, never to feel the rush of
electrons ever again. But their sacrifice shall not go unmarked

(sniff)

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2002\07\05@043542 by ISO-8859-1?Q?Ruben_J=F6nsson?=
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face
2 channel, category 4 light barrier safety device using 2*16C57. A couple
of thousand units built.

2 channel, category 4 muting device for the above unit, using 2*16C57. A
couple of hundred units built.

Keyboard and LCD display and a couple of I/O pins connected to an RS485 bus
using a 16C63. Project closed before it hit the market, 3 working
prototypes built.

A controller for an electrostatic discharger with a pulsed high voltage,
using an SX28. About one thousand built.

A break detector on a serial line using a 12C508. About one thousand built.

A soft starter (phase controlled) for a central vacuum cleaner unit (is
that the word for it?), using a 12C508. Project closed before finished, 2
prototypes built.

A LED sequencer for a christmas cake house (is that the word for it?),
using a 16C57. For my own amusement - 1 built.

A general purpose RS485 node with 4 digital inputs, 4 digital outputs and a
1-wire (dallas) interface for my (unfinished) home automation project,
using a 16F84. Unfinished, 1 prototype built.

An RS485 node with a 1-wire dallas interface for up to 32 temperature
sensors, EEPROM and 2 hex switches for address selection. Using an SX18. A
couple of hundred built. Soon to be converted to surface mount for higher
volume market.

Same as above but an LCD display and a couple of keys instead of the RS485
interface. A battery powered hand held device. Using an SX28. About 50
built.

A controller for a grain dryer with 4-20mA input (12 bit AD) for the
sensor, EEPROM for configuration, RS232 interface for a PC logger, RS485
interface for networking, 2*16 LCD display, 6 front panel key switches a
couple of relay outputs and optically isolated digital inputs. Using an
SX52. About 100 built.

Almost same hardware as above but for an on-line oxygen sensor for food
packaging equipment. Soon to be released, first 50 series is started.

A keypad lock. With codes for up to 10 users, that can be changed
individually. 1 built and used for the lab door here at work (will never be
any more since I have lost the source :-( ).

Ruben

{Quote hidden}

==============================
Ruben Jvnsson
AB Liros Electronic
Box 9124, 200 39 Malmv, Sweden
TEL INT +46 40142078
FAX INT +46 40947388
rubenspamspam_OUTpp.sbbs.se
==============================

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2002\07\05@044839 by dr. Imre Bartfai

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Major projects:

- Control system for a 5-phase stepper motor
- PC interface for a VFD
- GSM phone controller (an emergency station)
- a 24Cxx programmer
- a key entry system with logging based on used payphone cards
- iButton reader station
- a printer interface for a gas analyser

- some smaller and/or NDA projects...

Regards:

Imre

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'[PIC]: RE: What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\05@061406 by Alain Pelletier

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I am relatively new to PIC - about 1 month and have ported software from
Zorld Jackrabbit to PIC16F628.  The Zworld code took about 24 K of program
space, the pic version took only a bit over 1K.

Check out my first PIC - JAL project
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jallist/files/AlainP/proto.htm

Alain Pelletier

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'[PICLIST] What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\05@064346 by Oliver Spencer

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How do you get the instructions required to control a Nokia 5110? Any
help would be great.

-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU] On Behalf Of Pretorius Johan * Spoornet
Sent: 05 July 2002 6:30 AM
To: TakeThisOuTPICLISTEraseMEspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: What have you designed using PIC?


1. Complete home alarm system with GSM communications (Nokia 5110) to
contol the alarm and send alarm messages to specified cellphone numbers
2. 4 Input 2output Monitoring device sending SMS messages when
triggered.



-----Original Message-----
From: GB [RemoveMEquestuk1spamTakeThisOuTHOTMAIL.COM]
Sent: 04 July 2002 12:53
To: PICLISTEraseMEspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: What have you designed using PIC?


Hi,

I think it would be interesting to find out what designs the PIC is
capable of, so feel free to add to this, and add a small description!



Personally I have designed and built are:


1) 64 Way cable tester (detects shorts, opens, crossed wires, then
displayed faulty wires using LED grid)

2) Lost key beeper (Beeps after 24 hours of none movement)

3) Light that turned on when user stepped on a hidden security mat
(transmitted to a lamp via RF and turned the Lamp on)

4) Intelligent battery Display using LCD to display run time of battery


OK its over to you, what novel or bizarre things have you done with PIC?

Thanks Gary

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2002\07\05@070852 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> Jinx's place is a House Of Pain for PICs today. Feel sorry for
> them. Lifeless, their wee legs in the air, never to feel the rush of
> electrons ever again.

If you really want this to happen you could introduce them to messrs Van de
Graff, Wimshurst or Tesla - always good for a few more migratory electrons.
Failing that, pressing them into service as part of a lightning rod would
have a similar albeit intermittent effect.

       RM

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'[PIC]: RE: What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\05@092414 by Chris Loiacono

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Check out Alain's link below. It seems he has found even another way to keep
his boards from corroding....hehe..

Chris

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'[PICLIST] What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\05@112217 by John Dammeyer

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Hi guys and gals,

1) An PIC based RS485 based network of nodes including display modules,
sensing modules and motor control modules for Ostrich Egg Incubators.
(really!)

2) PIC based IBM keyboard emulator for 16 buttons used for PC control
while person lies in nose of aircraft for aerial mapping.

3) PIC based Aircraft Engine Ignition controller

4) PIC based Engine to Propeller speed tachometer output converter

5) A 3 PIC network for measuring Drill bit angle and other parameters
for reporting back to the surface while doing directional drilling for
oil.

4) PIC based Throttle Body Fuel Injection and ignition controller for
Honda Aircraft Engines.

5) PIC based, Solar charged LED Flashing Beacons in 3 different flavours
with 3 different PIC processors

6) PIC based LED flashlight

7) PIC plus CAN bus 2 line 7 Segment 4 digit LED Panel Instrument for
Aircraft Engine Monitoring.

8) Activity board for Wireless CANRF module.

9) 80C592 based Aircraft multi-point Sequential Fuel Injection and CD
Ignition for Honda Aircraft Engines.

10) A host of other non PIC projects and some purely software projects
where others have designed the hardware.

11) Foundry Furnace Controller using CANDIP.

12) Other projects under NDA -- software and hardware

13) Always open for more projects at reasonable consulting rates.  8-)


John Dammeyer

Wireless CAN with the CANRF module.
www.autoartisans.com/documents/canrf_prod_announcement.pdf
Automation Artisans Inc.
Ph. 1 250 544 4950

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2002\07\05@121215 by Quentin

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face
Hi all
Business:
Multifunction counter with LCD - currently in production.
Large LED display - currently in production.
Various once off stepper controls and indexers (about 7). One of then I
replaced a 24 chip 8051 system with a 3 chip (16C54, and two I2C I/O)
system and it had more functions. It was also the first PIC project I
got paid for.
Slave followers (Machine control)
Heater control (12C508, PWM, Mosfet)
Magnetic brake control (12C671, PWM, Mosfet and A/D)
12-24 DC motor control (12C671, PWM, Mosfet and A/D)
Cut size controller for a sawmill.
Oil feed controllers.

And a whole bunch of projects NDA, under development, and scrapped
ideas.
And the fastest turn around from idea to operation: 1.5 hrs. Needed 2 OR
gates and 1 AND gate. 12c508, Veroboard, installed and up and running. I
picked up a lot of respect for these 8 pin micro's over the years.

Hobby:
R/C speed control
R/C elevon mixer
64 LED Xmas lights rope (made the wife happy) Each LED can be switch on
individually.
Wish I had more time to do hobby stuff.

Quentin

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2002\07\05@125612 by Pic Dude

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Hmmm... between the 2 of us, we could open and fully populate
a PIC cemetary.



-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[KILLspamPICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Jinx
Sent: Friday, July 05, 2002 2:24 AM
To: EraseMEPICLISTspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: What have you designed using PIC?


Current project - finding out in how many ways you can turn an
F877 into a current sink / super-SCR / landfill. Side project -
determining the amount of brain damage said PIC can suffer
and still kinda work

Jinx's place is a House Of Pain for PICs today. Feel sorry for
them. Lifeless, their wee legs in the air, never to feel the rush of
electrons ever again. But their sacrifice shall not go unmarked

(sniff)

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2002\07\05@130928 by Harold M Hallikainen

picon face
Well, let's see....

1. 18c452 based lighting controller that reads a bunch of pots and
generates DMX (250 kbps EIA422). Individual 24 channel boards both
transmit and receive DMX so they can be cascaded to make larger
controllers. Crossfader board uses another 18c452 to crossfade between
scenes including a "virtual second scene." Crossfader board also supports
use of submasters. Submasters are stored in capacitor (1F) backed SRAM.
http://www.dovesystems.com/BuildPage.php?page=tm

2. 18c452 based lighting controller. Similar features to above, but
smaller non-expandable unit. Includes programmable patching of channels
to dimmers (outgoing DMX). Uses alphanumeric LCD. Patch tables also held
in capacitor backed RAM. http://www.dovesystems.com/?page=iq512 .

3. 18c452 based parallel port interface to DMX in/out. Computer control
of theatrical lighting. http://www.dovesystems.com/?page=sp

4. 16c74 based phase control dimmer. Supports up to 24 channels. Receives
DMX and analog control. Drives external 10 bit D/A that is demuxed out
and compared with line synchronized linear ramps. Tables handle RMS and
perceived brightness versus "delay to turn on" compensation. Measures
line frequency on reset to determine which table to use. Includes
capabilities to transmit RMS line current on 3 phase input and heat sink
temperature on DMX pins 4 and 5. RMS line current is calculated from
instantaneous samples using current sense transformers.
http://www.dovesystems.com/BuildPage.php?page=rmd

5. 18c452 (recently changed from 16c74 to reduce UART overruns) based
four channel light dimmer. Accepts DMX and analog control. Generates
triac drive using CCP based interrupts. Measures line frequency on reset.
Uses tables to convert desired level (DMX or analog) to timing into half
cycle for triac turn on.
http://www.dovesystems.com/BuildPage.php?page=shoebox .

6. 16c74 based DMX to analog decoders. Uses PWM to generate analog, which
is then demuxed out on multichannel units.
http://www.dovesystems.com/BuildPage.php?page=mtx

7. 16f870 based telemetry for petrochemical industry. Interface measures
four steam pressures (steam injection oil wells) on user specified
interval. Powers up transducers, measures over 20 second period (256
samples from each transducer over 20 seconds), At end of measurement,
data is sent serially to UHF radio for transmission. Between
measurements, PIC sleeps and is awakened by 32 kHz clock on timer1.

8. 18c252 (with ISD4004-08M) based hand held device to assist in teaching
Braille. http://www.braillemaster.biz

9. 16c716 based voltage regulator/controller for halogen lamp in dental
composite filling curing light. Calculates RMS each half cycle based on
instantaneous voltage measurements. Uses CCP to turn on triac at
appropriate time.

10. 16f628 based front panel controller for dental curing light (both
halogen and xenon based). Uses PWM output to control regulator board
(item 9 above) where dentist wants to reduce power of lamp. Programmable
to a wide variety of curing/bleaching requirements. Uses TAOS light to
frequency converter to allow user to measure mw/cm^2 out end of tip.
Calibration factor for light meter, user timer intervals, and system hour
meter held in eeprom. Uses UART to communicate with wand controller,
below.

11. 16f627 based "wand" controller. This hand held device is at end of
light pipe bringing light from xenon or halogen lamp to tooth (teeth) to
be exposed. 16f627 communicates with front panel controller (item 10,
above) over 1 wire (plus 5V and ground) using UART. Provides remote
control of start/stop, mode, and 2 digit 7 segment LED display.

12. In the works... 18c452 based user interface control for cinema sound
controller. Provides user interface with various keys, front panel
graphic LCD display, and several DSPs over SPI.

A few other small projects in various industries.....  Fun stuff!

Harold


FCC Rules Online at http://hallikainen.com/FccRules
Lighting control for theatre and television at http://www.dovesystems.com

Reach broadcasters, engineers, manufacturers, compliance labs, and
attorneys.
Advertise at http://www.hallikainen.com/FccRules/ .


________________________________________________________________
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Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:
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2002\07\05@140205 by Harold M Hallikainen

picon face
On Fri, 5 Jul 2002 08:20:04 -0700 John Dammeyer <TakeThisOuTjohnd.....spamTakeThisOuTAUTOARTISANS.COM>
writes:


[deletia]
>
> 6) PIC based LED flashlight
>

       Really a great list of projects! We always joked that a processor based
flashlight would need three buttons. Those being; ON, OFFF, and RESET.

Harold

FCC Rules Online at http://hallikainen.com/FccRules
Lighting control for theatre and television at http://www.dovesystems.com

Reach broadcasters, engineers, manufacturers, compliance labs, and
attorneys.
Advertise at http://www.hallikainen.com/FccRules/ .


________________________________________________________________
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Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:
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2002\07\05@142039 by John Dammeyer

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Hi Harold,

Turning it off effectively does the reset (slide switch).  ;-)

In fact,  the LED flashlight uses the high intensity LEDs and does some
fancy stuff to give about 400 hours of use before the 3 AA batteries
need replacement.  I've been up at night in a C-172 and used it to check
if ice was building up on the leading edge during crappy weather so it's
got a decent red light range and doesn't affect night vision unless you
look directly at it.  In that case,  ouch!

John Dammeyer

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2002\07\05@143952 by fred jones

picon face
Everybody knows the real purpose of a flashlight and I don't see a PIC
having any place in it.  A flashlight is a place to store your dead
batteries...
Fred


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2002\07\05@144411 by Brendan Moran

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The PIC monitors the number of dead batteries and displays them on a little
LCD which it powers by sucking what little juice is left in the batteries
out via a charge pump.

> Everybody knows the real purpose of a flashlight and I don't see a PIC
> having any place in it.  A flashlight is a place to store your dead
> batteries...
> Fred
>

--Brendan

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'[OT]: RE: What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\05@170644 by Pic Dude

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My own pacemaker. (Decided I could do it lower cost with
a PIC).  It uses 2 matched crystals in a redundant setup
for more accurate timing, and 2 batteries, one backing
up the other.  It works well, except that ICSP is really
painful if I don't wait for the scars to heal from the
previous ICSP session.  Oh, and there's one elusive bug
that I need to track down, but I'll get to that later,
cause right now, I'm feeling a bit dizzy again...

:-)




{Original Message removed}

'[PICLIST] What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\05@170913 by fred jones

picon face
I stand corrected  :-)


{Quote hidden}

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'[OT]: RE: What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\05@174714 by H. Carl Ott

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Perhaps the weirdest pic application for me was a small 16f84 based unit
that drove an ISD sound chip and an audio amp. It would randomly wake up
and play barnyard animal calls that I had downloaded from the net.
  A friend of mine had just opened a BBQ restaurant and he wanted the
noises played randomly in the restrooms.
  The volume was low, just enough to freak out people who thought the
ghosts of the food they just ate were haunting them.

 I had extra room on the sound chip so every 500th  time or so it would
play a godzilla roar.  That woke 'em up.

  A louder variation of the design would play a particularly well known
bit of dialog from the movie "Deliverance" when food orders were ready in
the kitchen.
  I remember having trouble eliminating  pops when the sound chip powered up.

 And of course a  whole slew of other quite boring pic designs involving
dallas touch devices, pocsag encoding, frequency agile 2.4ghz video
receivers and various led blinky things.

 regards
 -carl




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'[OT]: What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\07\05@180739 by Jinx

face picon face
> My own pacemaker. (Decided I could do it lower cost with
> a PIC).  It uses 2 matched crystals in a redundant setup
> for more accurate timing, and 2 batteries, one backing
> up the other.  It works well, except that ICSP is really
> painful if I don't wait for the scars to heal from the
> previous ICSP session

For ICSP maybe you should take a look at that bionic version
of Apple's Firewire. Very simple plug-in system. Er, what's it
called again ? "Fire-cock" was it ?

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2002\07\05@190825 by Pic Dude

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Sounds very painful.   [*cringe*]
But in that case, I'd need to run long wires up to my
heart.  I need to research the effects of EMI on the
stomach.  Perhaps it would boost metabolism?  Hmmm...
weight loss from a PIC...???

Another option would be to transfer the ICSP signals
via some other, non-intrusive method.  Picture this --
stick head in (modified) microwave, and hit the
"Download hex file" button.  :-)

Cheers,
-Neil,



{Original Message removed}

2002\07\05@193816 by Jinx

face picon face
> Sounds very painful.   [*cringe*]
> But in that case, I'd need to run long wires up to my heart

"long" wires eh ?

OK, everyone around the table...............

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2002\07\06@010755 by Reginald Neale

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>The PIC monitors the number of dead batteries and displays them on a little
>LCD which it powers by sucking what little juice is left in the batteries
>out via a charge pump.

  ...flashes "IDIOT - YOU SHOULD HAVE REPLACED
  THESE BATTERIES XXX MONTHS AGO"

> > Everybody knows the real purpose of a flashlight and I don't see a PIC
> > having any place in it.  A flashlight is a place to store your dead
> > batteries...
> > Fred
> >

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2002\07\06@042420 by Joe Farr

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But a power fail occures in the middle of upgrading the firmware - so the PIC just sit's with no firmware loaded while your on the floor clutching your chest.


{Original Message removed}

2002\07\06@051400 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Fri, 5 Jul 2002, John Dammeyer wrote:

>Hi Harold,
>
>Turning it off effectively does the reset (slide switch).  ;-)
>
>In fact,  the LED flashlight uses the high intensity LEDs and does some
>fancy stuff to give about 400 hours of use before the 3 AA batteries
>need replacement.  I've been up at night in a C-172 and used it to check
>if ice was building up on the leading edge during crappy weather so it's
>got a decent red light range and doesn't affect night vision unless you
>look directly at it.  In that case,  ouch!

Are you supposed to fly at night in a C-172 in bad weather ?

Peter

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2002\07\06@090818 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Sat, 6 Jul 2002, Joe Farr wrote:

>But a power fail occures in the middle of upgrading the firmware - so the
>PIC just sit's with no firmware loaded while your on the floor clutching
>your chest.

But he has a backup van de Graf (sp! Harnivore) to zap him back into life
if such a thing happens. It is triggered by the little captain's elbow on
the poop castle of the sailing ship model, which is tethered by the rubber
bung that is kept taut and thus the boat away from the shore of the small
water-filled tub, by a mains-powered running fan.

Peter

PS: My slanted kicks on Harnivore are related to vanishing email. I am
well aware of its usefulness as an early warning tool. I DO NOT want to
be aware of its use as a censorship device. Just to make a thing clear.

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2002\07\06@092259 by Bill & Pookie

picon face
Hummmmm?

Looks like this thread and the happy birthday thread are about to join.

Pookie

----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter L. Peres" <RemoveMEplpspamspamBeGoneACTCOM.CO.IL>
To: <spamBeGonePICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Saturday, July 06, 2002 1:28 AM
Subject: Re: What have you designed using PIC?


>
> Are you supposed to fly at night in a C-172 in bad weather ?
>
> Peter

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2002\07\06@101556 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Sat, 6 Jul 2002, Bill & Pookie wrote:

>Hummmmm?
>
>Looks like this thread and the happy birthday thread are about to join.

Huh ? Translation please. Or was this a genuine none sequitur.

Peter

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2002\07\06@104221 by Bill & Pookie

picon face
Think some one was going to ask "Why were you
flying in a C170 in bad weather and where were
you?"

And the answer would involve him in the military
flying over some far off country risking his life
doing what the USA asked him to do.

Pookie

{Original Message removed}


'[PIC] What have you designed using PIC?'
2002\11\06@155634 by Jinx
face picon face
----- Original Message -----
From: "Micro Eng" <micro_engspam_OUTspam@spam@HOTMAIL.COM>
To: <spamBeGonePICLIST@spam@spamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Wednesday, November 06, 2002 4:37 AM
Subject: Re: [PICLIST] What have you designed using PIC?


> hey...any details on the christmas rope? time is approaching...

Try a chaser.......

http://home.clear.net.nz/pages/joecolquitt/0chaser.html

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2002\11\06@163203 by hard Prosser

flavicon
face
I'm just not too sure on the safety of the system, Jinx.
The bulbs are connected directly to AC so they would need suitable physical
protection - how have you organised that?

RP




{Original Message removed}

2002\11\06@192736 by Jinx

face picon face
> I'm just not too sure on the safety of the system, Jinx.
> The bulbs are connected directly to AC so they would need
> suitable physical protection - how have you organised that?
>
> RP

I presume this is what you're talking about -

The strings used where sheathed in clear heat-shrink tubing. But
many 240V strings available off the shelf don't have even that
protection - the bulbs are bare and as they have passed all the
regs and been deemed fit for sale I guess you take the same risk
that you would with any exposed conductor. Obviously it's not the
intention to make something dangerous, but accidents and stupid
human tricks do happen

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2002\11\06@195855 by hard Prosser

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face
(Subject changed to [EE]:)

Sounds strange - I'd always assumed that the exposed bulb type operated via
a transformer.
I live in one of the main "Xmas Light" areas of Chch. and over the last few
years there
has been some vandalism of my neighbours lights resulting in exposed,
broken filaments.
Maybe I should tell him to leave them turned on!
(Or change to a string of neons operating at 2kV)
RP




> I'm just not too sure on the safety of the system, Jinx.
> The bulbs are connected directly to AC so they would need
> suitable physical protection - how have you organised that?
>
> RP

I presume this is what you're talking about -

The strings used where sheathed in clear heat-shrink tubing. But
many 240V strings available off the shelf don't have even that
protection - the bulbs are bare and as they have passed all the
regs and been deemed fit for sale I guess you take the same risk
that you would with any exposed conductor. Obviously it's not the
intention to make something dangerous, but accidents and stupid
human tricks do happen

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2002\11\06@203408 by Jinx

face picon face
> Maybe I should tell him to leave them turned on!
> (Or change to a string of neons operating at 2kV)
> RP

There's LEDs. If you like fiddly soldering and heat-shrinking

You could fuse the string but that wouldn't protect much against
personal shock, and I don't know if an RCD would pass the
switching very well. And there's always buying sensibly, ie not
from, well, you can imagine where they're made and who sells
them........ There's cheap, and then there's cheap and nasty

A string of parallel bulbs would be better, and then you could run
it from 6V. I don't particularly like series arrangements.

I remember dad, always slightly the worse for wear after several
Xmas tipples, doing the annual tradition of trying to find which bulb
had blown using some very un-Christmassy language. I'm surprised
Santa didn't come back and nuke us

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2002\11\06@204258 by Jim

flavicon
face
  "You could fuse the string but that wouldn't
   protect much against personal shock,"

Isn't this a *perfect* application for one of
those "new fangled" plug-in-at-the-outlet GFI
devices?

Or are they only available to us residing in N. America
who use the civilised house-mains voltage of 120 V?

RF Jim


{Original Message removed}

2002\11\06@210509 by hard Prosser

flavicon
face
Yep - That's my job these days - with pretty much the same results!
It always seems that there are 2 bulbs blown for some reason, so doing a
progressive swap just doesn't find the problem.

I'm always a bit wary these days about where the tinsel on the tree sits
also - more than the lights can light up otherwise!
On the other hand, with a suitable exciter, electroluminecent tinsel could
be a big hit.

RP


I remember dad, always slightly the worse for wear after several
Xmas tipples, doing the annual tradition of trying to find which bulb
had blown using some very un-Christmassy language. I'm surprised
Santa didn't come back and nuke us

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2002\11\07@031540 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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face
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jim [SMTP:spamBeGonejvpollspam@spam@DALLAS.NET]
> Sent: Thursday, November 07, 2002 1:42 AM
> To:   RemoveMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject:      Re: [EE]: What have you designed using PIC?
>
>    "You could fuse the string but that wouldn't
>     protect much against personal shock,"
>
> Isn't this a *perfect* application for one of
> those "new fangled" plug-in-at-the-outlet GFI
> devices?
>
> Or are they only available to us residing in N. America
> who use the civilised house-mains voltage of 120 V?
>
No, they are also available in the parts of the world where you can plug
high power devices into the mains as well :o)

Mike

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2002\11\07@091854 by Jim

flavicon
face
Gosh, you could not tell I was kidding
when I wrote that little 'jab'?

The use of 120V "mains" is no more or no less
'civilized' than the use any other "mains" voltage
in a home.

I *do* think that the two-blade and two-blade/one-prong
"power plugs" we use here in N. America are badly in
need of re-design - as it is too easy for a child to
come in contact with the mains voltage. A much better
mechanism would prevent the exposure of the energized
metallic blades as a plug is inserted *or* removed and
I'm sure this would also work to reduce the occurance
of fires in the home (and office!).

To *not* consider a re-design with safety in mind, I
think, is uncivilized ...

RF Jim


----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael Rigby-Jones" <spam_OUTmrjonesspam_OUTspamspam_OUTNORTELNETWORKS.COM>
To: <PICLISTspam_OUTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Thursday, November 07, 2002 2:14 AM
Subject: Re: [EE]: What have you designed using PIC?


> > {Original Message removed}

2002\11\07@102331 by ards, Justin P

flavicon
face
Since stupid human was mentioned below i just had to share my story...

When i was quite young I thought I knew a bit about things electrical, so
nearing xmas the tree was up and the lights were yet to work.

So fresh out of the swimming pool, still wet and sitting on a concrete floor
I thought it was time to fix em.

I read the voltage on the bulbs, 14volts.  Ahh I thought that cant hurt me
so I began to insert wires so i could work out which bulb was open circuit.

Yes you guessed, I got a very good 240v shock, but i think the bigger shock
was that my assessment was soooo wrong.

Took me many years before i discovered exactly why i got booted.

Justin

PS Have had many a failed argument with some electrical professionals when I
tell my story and state that if you remove 1 14v bulb from daisy chained
xmas lights and measure across the 2 contacts in the light socket with a
voltmeter it will read 240v.

{Original Message removed}

2002\11\07@110218 by 4HAZ

flavicon
face
----- From: "Richards, Justin P" <Justin.Richards@
- snip -
> PS Have had many a failed argument with some electrical professionals when I
> tell my story and state that if you remove 1 14v bulb from daisy chained
> xmas lights and measure across the 2 contacts in the light socket with a
> voltmeter it will read 240v.

Voltage readings in series are dependant on the circuits total voltage (Et), total current (It), and the resistance of the meter, any good VTVM or high impedance meter would have shown the full voltage, however an old circuit powered meter is a low impedance device. (It) times (meter resistance) = voltage read.

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2002\11\07@114740 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   any good VTVM or high impedance meter would have shown the full voltage,
   however an old circuit powered meter is a low impedance device.

Hmm.  A raw circuit-powered analog meter is a "low impedance device"
compared to a modern digital voltmeter, but I'll bet most are still rather
high-impedance compared to a string of 14V light bulbs, so you'll probably
still read pretty close to 240V at your "missing bulb" location.  IIRC, my
last analog meter had an impedence of about 10k ohms (or was that 10k
ohms/volt of range?)

BillW

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2002\11\07@122546 by Jim

flavicon
face
It *would* be  10k or (20 K) ohms/volt of range for
DC - more like 5K/Volt on the AC ranges.

So, on the 300 V range figure figure:

  300 * 5,000 = 1.5 MOhm input R

Test:

I just checked (actually measured it!) this on my old
Trtplett 630 (on the 300 v range) and this bears out
(it's true!) ...

RF Jim


{Original Message removed}

2002\11\07@152251 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Fri, 8 Nov 2002, Richards, Justin P wrote:

*>PS Have had many a failed argument with some electrical professionals when I
*>tell my story and state that if you remove 1 14v bulb from daisy chained
*>xmas lights and measure across the 2 contacts in the light socket with a
*>voltmeter it will read 240v.

The professionals may have been right if the ligts were modern and had
vdrs in the sockets. These prevent the whole string to go off if a bulb
blows and also equalise voltage while running.

Peter

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2002\11\07@191833 by ards, Justin P

flavicon
face
what is vdrs?
Justin

-----Original Message-----
From: Peter L. Peres [spam_OUTplpspamKILLspamACTCOM.CO.IL]
Sent: Friday, 8 November 2002 03:49
To: RemoveMEPICLISTRemoveMEspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [PIC] What have you designed using PIC?


On Fri, 8 Nov 2002, Richards, Justin P wrote:

*>PS Have had many a failed argument with some electrical professionals when
I
*>tell my story and state that if you remove 1 14v bulb from daisy chained
*>xmas lights and measure across the 2 contacts in the light socket with a
*>voltmeter it will read 240v.

The professionals may have been right if the ligts were modern and had
vdrs in the sockets. These prevent the whole string to go off if a bulb
blows and also equalise voltage while running.

Peter

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2002\11\08@114917 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Fri, 8 Nov 2002, Richards, Justin P wrote:

*>what is vdrs?

Voltage Dependent Resistors (aka MOV or Metal Oxide Varistors).

Peter

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2002\11\10@052955 by Roman Black

flavicon
face
Hee hee! Sounds like Darwinism at work...
Some species emerge from the water and then
continue evolving, some emerge and, well... <grin>
-Roman


Richards, Justin P wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2002\11\11@100832 by 4HAZ

flavicon
face
----- From: "William Chops Westfield" <billw@

>     any good VTVM or high impedance meter would have shown the full voltage,
>     however an old circuit powered meter is a low impedance device.
>
> Hmm.  A raw circuit-powered analog meter is a "low impedance device"
> compared to a modern digital voltmeter, but I'll bet most are still rather
> high-impedance compared to a string of 14V light bulbs, so you'll probably
> still read pretty close to 240V at your "missing bulb" location.  IIRC, my
> last analog meter had an impedence of about 10k ohms (or was that 10k
> ohms/volt of range?)
>
> BillW
We do not know the bulbs were 14v, only that that was the reading.
You are probably referring to 10K ohms per volt, the little $7 meters from Radio Shack were 1K ohms per volt which would mean 15k ohms on the 15 volt scale.
There are still many old 600 ohm meters floating around the surplus market, I have one and trust it more when working around high power R.F. because it is less susceptible to giving false readings in that environment.
There are several unknowns here, 1 meter impedance, 2 whether his reading was taken with a blown bulb in series with the meter (a high impedance meter can show several volts in this configuration if there is moisture across the blown bulb, or he had a finger on one of the probes providing a hi-Z Ground path), the total power, and # of bulbs.

Lonnie - KF4HAZ -

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