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'[PICLIST] Step motor controllers'
2001\12\15@165327 by David VanHorn

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I'm looking for a chopped bridge driver, preferrably a dual, for use with
low voltage (6V-8.5v) motor supplies.

Everything I've found so far wants at least 10V, but I don't have 10V to give!
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2001\12\15@183849 by Tal Bejerano - AMC

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Try:
http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?category=100&type=store

they have lots of stuff!

Tal

{Original Message removed}

2001\12\15@200410 by David VanHorn

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At 01:36 AM 12/16/01 +0200, Tal Bejerano - AMC wrote:
>Try:
>http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?category=100&type=store
>
>they have lots of stuff!

Yes, but nothing I can design into a product.

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2001\12\15@211049 by Rudy Rudy

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Dave,

Will this work?

http://www.acroname.com/robotics/parts/R6-754410.html


Rudy


-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[spam_OUTPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of David VanHorn
Sent: Saturday, December 15, 2001 4:55 PM
To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Step motor controllers


I'm looking for a chopped bridge driver, preferrably a dual, for use with
low voltage (6V-8.5v) motor supplies.

Everything I've found so far wants at least 10V, but I don't have 10V to
give!
--
Dave's Engineering Page: http://www.dvanhorn.org

Got a need to read Bar codes?  http://www.barcodechip.com
Bi-directional read of UPC-A, UPC-E, EAN-8, EAN-13, JAN, and Bookland, with
two or five digit supplemental codes, in an 8 pin chip, with NO external
parts.

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2001\12\15@215031 by Kathy Quinlan

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----- Original Message -----
From: "David VanHorn" <dvanhornspamKILLspamCEDAR.NET>


> I'm looking for a chopped bridge driver, preferrably a dual, for use with
> low voltage (6V-8.5v) motor supplies.
>
> Everything I've found so far wants at least 10V, but I don't have 10V to
give!

Try Allegro micro systems, they have a few bridge drivers, that run from VCC
to 45+V

Two the come to mind are the A3952SB (single driver) and the A3964SB (dual
driver)

Regards,

Kat.


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2001\12\16@021043 by David VanHorn

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At 09:20 PM 12/15/01 -0500, Rudy Rudy wrote:
>Dave,
>
>Will this work?
>
>http://www.acroname.com/robotics/parts/R6-754410.html

No current chopping, otherwise looks ok.
--
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2001\12\17@091714 by Roman Black

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> -----Original Message-----

> I'm looking for a chopped bridge driver, preferrably a dual, for use with
> low voltage (6V-8.5v) motor supplies.
>
> Everything I've found so far wants at least 10V, but I don't have 10V to
> give!
> --
> Dave's Engineering Page: http://www.dvanhorn.org


David, there is little to be gained by using chopping
with such a low supply voltage. What voltage and current
motors are you using? Maybe if you explain more you
might get more responses on this one? :o)
-Roman

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2001\12\17@095151 by Thomas McGahee

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Chopping is generally used with circuits where the supply
voltage is considerably higher than the rated voltage of
the stepper motor. The chopping is used to implement a
form of more or less constant current control.

Applying a constant current control to the steppers instead
of a constant voltage allows larger initial voltages and
results in better motor torque and faster stepping rates.

I said that chopping is a form of more or less constant
current control because the mechanism by which the chopping
is implemented usually involves a periodic turn-on time
with the turn off being achieved when the current exceeds
a certain threshold. Thus there can be a certain looseness
in the average current value, but it is quite tolerable.

If your voltage is close to the rated voltage of the steppers,
then chopping will gain you nothing.

Fr. Thomas McGahee


> -----Original Message-----

> I'm looking for a chopped bridge driver, preferrably a dual, for use >with
low voltage (6V-8.5v) motor supplies.
>
> Everything I've found so far wants at least 10V, but I don't have 10V >to
give!
> --
> Dave's Engineering Page: http://www.dvanhorn.org
>

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2001\12\17@095344 by David VanHorn

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>
>David, there is little to be gained by using chopping
>with such a low supply voltage. What voltage and current
>motors are you using? Maybe if you explain more you
>might get more responses on this one? :o)
>-Roman

It's a 5 ohm motor, bipolar windings, running from a 6-8.5V supply.
The motor wants 0.5A.
I don't want to spend any more power than I must in driving it, since this
is a battery operated application.
--
Dave's Engineering Page: http://www.dvanhorn.org

Got a need to read Bar codes?  http://www.barcodechip.com
Bi-directional read of UPC-A, UPC-E, EAN-8, EAN-13, JAN, and Bookland, with
two or five digit supplemental codes, in an 8 pin chip, with NO external parts.

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2001\12\17@100822 by David VanHorn

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At 09:52 AM 12/17/01 -0500, Thomas McGahee wrote:
>Chopping is generally used with circuits where the supply
>voltage is considerably higher than the rated voltage of
>the stepper motor. The chopping is used to implement a
>form of more or less constant current control.

Yes, that is what I am trying to do.

>Applying a constant current control to the steppers instead
>of a constant voltage allows larger initial voltages and
>results in better motor torque and faster stepping rates.

Thanks for the definition.


>If your voltage is close to the rated voltage of the steppers,
>then chopping will gain you nothing.

Except power conservation, which I need.

--
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Got a need to read Bar codes?  http://www.barcodechip.com
Bi-directional read of UPC-A, UPC-E, EAN-8, EAN-13, JAN, and Bookland, with
two or five digit supplemental codes, in an 8 pin chip, with NO external parts.

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2001\12\17@135240 by steve

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> It's a 5 ohm motor, bipolar windings, running from a 6-8.5V supply.
> The motor wants 0.5A. I don't want to spend any more power than I must
> in driving it, since this is a battery operated application.

You can't afford the losses of a darlington output device so your
best solution is probably to go semi-discrete with N-ch/P-ch half
bridge drivers or perhaps a low voltage DC motor driver device. Then
add your own current sense/chopper circuit.

I'd be tempted to have a play with MOS output controller IC's you've
already dismissed because of the minimum motor voltage.
AFAICT, the minimum would be dictated by the ability of the
charge pump to get a high enough Vgs on the top FET to turn it
hard on. I would expect that with a 6V supply you're going to be
close enough that even if the Rds on is twice what it is capable of,
you are still on the winning side. Try it. If it works OK for your
needs, flick an email to the chip supplier and ask for their opinion.

Steve.

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2001\12\19@060945 by Vasile Surducan

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On Mon, 17 Dec 2001, David VanHorn wrote:

>
> It's a 5 ohm motor, bipolar windings, running from a 6-8.5V supply.
> The motor wants 0.5A.
> I don't want to spend any more power than I must in driving it, since this
> is a battery operated application.
> --
 I say a bridge half with bipolars, half with MOS will be the better
choice. But I don't see why not 3717, 3770 ; 8.5V x 0.5 = 4.25VA
10V x 0.5 = 5VA
No big difference but easy way.
Vasile

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2001\12\19@104703 by David VanHorn

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At 01:03 PM 12/19/01 +0200, Vasile Surducan wrote:
>On Mon, 17 Dec 2001, David VanHorn wrote:
>
> >
> > It's a 5 ohm motor, bipolar windings, running from a 6-8.5V supply.
> > The motor wants 0.5A.
> > I don't want to spend any more power than I must in driving it, since this
> > is a battery operated application.
> > --
>   I say a bridge half with bipolars, half with MOS will be the better
>choice. But I don't see why not 3717, 3770 ; 8.5V x 0.5 = 4.25VA
>10V x 0.5 = 5VA
>No big difference but easy way.
>Vasile

Their spec says minimum motor voltage of 10V.

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2001\12\19@121131 by Roman Black

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> On Mon, 17 Dec 2001, David VanHorn wrote:
>
> >
> > It's a 5 ohm motor, bipolar windings, running from a 6-8.5V supply.
> > The motor wants 0.5A.
> > I don't want to spend any more power than I must in driving it, since this
> > is a battery operated application.


Sounds like a small 17 frame or pancake stepper,
2.5v 0.5A. You are unlikely to get better than
2:1 with any chopper IC so it will probably
cost you 200mA+ from the battery anyway.

Unless you need high speeds, I think the best
solution is to switch to a 12v 200mA motor,
these still have decent speeds and torques at
6v, and being unipolar you only need 4 tiny
fets to drive the motor, you can use low sat fets
as you only need 4 and the circuit is simple
enough to wire.

Another good point about the higher inductance
12v motor is that you can implement simple slow
pwm from the pic outputs, good for low power
"hold" modes and stuff. Now you will probably tell
me you have to use the 2.5v motor? ;o)
-Roman

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