Searching \ for ' PIC Book' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'PIC Book'.

No exact or substring matches. trying for part
PICList Thread
'Teaching by Example (was: "Re: PIC Book")'
1997\03\14@044211 by Andrew Warren

face
flavicon
face
Tjaart van der Walt <spam_OUTtjaartTakeThisOuTspamwasp.co.za> wrote:

> I feel that one should suffer a little bit in the beginning to
> develop a way of thinking. Copying other's code teaches nothing.

Tjaart:

I understand your point, but I'm not sure that you can make such a
blanket declaration about copying others' code.

For instance, how long do you suppose it would take a beginner to
come up with the following extremely-useful code fragments without
ever having seen them used in someone else's code?

#1:

   MOVF    SWITCH,W
   XORLW   CASE1           ;IF SWITCH = CASE1, JUMP TO LABEL1.
   BZ      LABEL1          ;
   XORLW   CASE2^CASE1     ;IF SWITCH = CASE2, JUMP TO LABEL2.
   BZ      LABEL2          ;
   XORLW   CASE3^CASE2     ;IF SWITCH = CASE3, JUMP TO LABEL3.
   BZ      LABEL3          ;

#2:

   ADDLW   256-HIVAL       ;THIS IS ERIC SMITH'S CODE TO TEST FOR
   ADDLW   (HIVAL-LOVAL)+1 ;"LOVAL <= W <= HIVAL".
   BC      INRANGE         ;

#3:

   ADDWF   PCL             ;CALCULATE 2^W, WHERE W IS IN THE
   ADDLW   0               ;RANGE [0-7].
   ADDLW   -1              ;
   ADDLW   -3              ;
   ADDLW   -7              ;
   ADDLW   -15             ;
   ADDLW   -31             ;
   ADDLW   -63             ;
   ADDLW   121             ;

#4:

   MOVF    BLO,W           ;DO A 16-BIT SUBTRACTION (A = A - B),
   SUBWF   ALO             ;WITH THE CARRY FLAG PROPERLY SET ON
   MOVF    BHI,W           ;COMPLETION.
   SKPC                    ;
   INCFSZ  BHI,W           ;
   SUBWF   AHI             ;

-Andy

=== Andrew Warren - .....fastfwdKILLspamspam@spam@ix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
===
=== Custodian of the PICLIST Fund -- For more info, see:
=== www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499/fund.html

1997\03\14@064137 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>I understand your point, but I'm not sure that you can make such a
>blanket declaration about copying others' code.

Very useful fragments, Andy.  Think I'll have to steal some of them!

I agree with you 100%.  Some of the neatest things in my code were thought
up by somebody else!

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\03\14@071158 by tjaart

flavicon
face
Andy Kunz wrote:
>
> >I understand your point, but I'm not sure that you can make such a
> >blanket declaration about copying others' code.
>
> Very useful fragments, Andy.  Think I'll have to steal some of them!
>
> I agree with you 100%.  Some of the neatest things in my code were thought
> up by somebody else!

Sure... But do you reach for the ol' PIC archives if you want to do
some keyboard debouncing, or if you want to drive a LCD? (How many times
have I seen *that* line?)

I concede that one can learn a lot of 'tricks' by looking at what other
folks came up with, but if you are starting out, the hard way makes you
use that grey stuff upstairs.

I may be biased because that was the way I started out, but I feel one
has to adopt an inventive way of thinking when faced with the
restrictions
(ROM, RAM and I/O) of a small micro.

--
Friendly Regards

Tjaart van der Walt
tjaartspamKILLspamwasp.co.za
_____________________________________________________________
| Another sun-deprived R&D Engineer slaving away in a dungeon |
|             WASP International  http://wasp.co.za           |
|             GSM and GPS value-added applications            |
|  Voice : +27-(0)11-622-8686   |   Fax : +27-(0)11-622-8686  |
|_____________________________________________________________|

1997\03\14@100650 by Andrew Warren

face
flavicon
face
Tjaart van der Walt <.....tjaartKILLspamspam.....wasp.co.za> wrote:

> But do you reach for the ol' PIC archives if you want to do some
> keyboard debouncing, or if you want to drive a LCD? (How many times
> have I seen *that* line?)

   Yeah... My favorite posts are the ones that go something like:

       "Does anyone have code to read numbers entered on a keypad,
       perform floating-point calculations on them, display text on
       an LCD, and drive 4 stepper motors according to what was
       entered?

       "I'd write it myself, but I don't want to re-invent the
       wheel...

       "[signed]
       John Doe
       Custom Industrial Controls, Inc."

> I concede that one can learn a lot of 'tricks' by looking at what
> other folks came up with, but if you are starting out, the hard way
> makes you use that grey stuff upstairs.

   You're right; as I said, I can see your point.  I was only saying
   that those "tricks" can open the eyes of beginning programmers
   (and even experienced ones like Andy Kunz) to entirely new
   techniques that they might be unlikely to discover themselves.

   For a COMPLETE beginner, of course, tricks like the examples I
   posted won't help at all... But for a slightly more advanced
   programmer, understanding them is the key to becoming a MUCH
   more advanced programmer.

   As you know, I do a fair amount of "pure" consulting in addition
   to the contract design that occupies most of my time... Most of
   that consulting is for companies with small (one- to
   three-person) software-engineering departments.

   You'd be amazed -- I was, initially -- at the lack of quality in
   the code produced by most of these teams... I usually ask to see
   examples of both their most-recently- and LEAST-recently-written
   code, and there's often no real improvement between the two
   examples, even in cases where the guys have been writing PIC
   code for YEARS.

   It's not their fault, really; it's just that they've usually been
   working in isolation and just don't realize that there ARE better
   ways.  Also, many of the "software engineers" in the
   embedded-control industry have little or no formal software
   training... Lots of them are electrical engineers who just fell
   into writing software out of necessity.

   No matter what the reason for their poor skills, though, most of
   the clients to whom I show those programming "tricks" INSTANTLY
   see the light and are able to make HUGE leaps forward.

   More importantly, though, the realization that "there are more
   things in assembly-language software than are dreamt of in their
   philosophy" seems to rekindle their interest in programming...
   The same guys who were content to let their skills stagnate for
   years suddenly start telephoning to tell me about the exciting
   new programming techniques they've "discovered", and when I make
   a followup visit six months after the initial one, I usually find
   that their newest code is SIGNIFICANTLY improved over the crap
   they used to write.

   So, to get back to my point...

   Programming languages are just like all human languages; it's
   possible (and maybe even desirable) to learn the vocabulary and
   grammar on your own, but in order to become FLUENT, you need to
   have a strong grasp on the language's idioms, dialects, and
   subtle nuances... And to accomplish that, you need to actually
   interact with people who already SPEAK the language.

   Just my opinion; I could be wrong.

   -Andy

=== Andrew Warren - EraseMEfastfwdspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
===
=== Custodian of the PICLIST Fund -- For more info, see:
=== www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499/fund.html

1997\03\14@103445 by John Payson

picon face
> For instance, how long do you suppose it would take a beginner to
> come up with the following extremely-useful code fragments without
> ever having seen them used in someone else's code?

How about this one [figure out what it does yourself :-)]

       movf    Num1,w
       movwf   Result

       movf    Num2,w
       subwf   Result,w
       btfss   C
        subwf  Result,f

       movf    Num3,w
       subwf   Result,w
       btfss   C
        subwf  Result,f

Anyone know of any smaller way?

1997\03\14@114956 by Andrew Warren

face
flavicon
face
John Payson <PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> How about this one [figure out what it does yourself :-)]
>
>         movf    Num1,w
>         movwf   Result
>
>         movf    Num2,w
>         subwf   Result,w
>         btfss   C
>          subwf  Result,f
>
>         movf    Num3,w
>         subwf   Result,w
>         btfss   C
>          subwf  Result,f
>
> Anyone know of any smaller way?

John:

Does this work?

       MOVF    NUM1,W
       SUBWF   NUM2,W

       MOVF    NUM1,W
       SKPC
       MOVF    NUM2,W

       MOVWF   RESULT

       SUBWF   NUM3,W
       SKPC
       ADDWF   RESULT

-Andy

=== Andrew Warren - @spam@fastfwdKILLspamspamix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
===
=== Custodian of the PICLIST Fund -- For more info, see:
=== www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499/fund.html

1997\03\14@122420 by Alan G. Smith

flavicon
face
Andy said in response to John:
> Does this work?
>
>         MOVF    NUM1,W
>         SUBWF   NUM2,W
>         MOVF    NUM1,W
...

Perhaps I just don't understand.  But wouldn't the third instruction destroy
all of the work of the first two?

+---------------
| Alan G. Smith
| KILLspamagsKILLspamspampoboxes.com
| http://www.innovatus.com/ags

1997\03\14@134347 by Andrew Warren

face
flavicon
face
Alan G. Smith <RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> Andy said in response to John:
> > Does this work?
> >
> >         MOVF    NUM1,W
> >         SUBWF   NUM2,W
> >         MOVF    NUM1,W
> ...
>
> Perhaps I just don't understand.  But wouldn't the third instruction
> destroy all of the work of the first two?

Alan:

Glad you asked.  Here... I'll explain.

First, though, a warning:

   IF YOU WANT TO FIGURE OUT ON YOUR OWN WHAT JOHN PAYSON'S CODE
   DOES, PLEASE READ NO FURTHER.

The rest of you can scroll down.

'(Fwd) Re: Teaching by Example (was: "Re: PIC Book"'
1997\03\14@140022 by Andrew Warren

face
flavicon
face
   Sorry... I guess the list-server doesn't like to see periods at
   the start of a line.  Here's the second try:

Alan G. Smith <spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Alan:

Glad you asked.  Here... I'll explain.

First, though, a warning:

   IF YOU WANT TO FIGURE OUT ON YOUR OWN WHAT JOHN PAYSON'S CODE
   DOES, PLEASE READ NO FURTHER.

The rest of you can scroll down.

*
 *
  *
   *
    *
     *
      *
       *
        *
         *
          *
           *
            *
             *
              *
               *
                *
                 *
                  *
                   *
                    *
                     *
                      *
                       *
                        *
                         *
                          *
                           *
                            *
                             *
                              *
                               *
                                *

Sorry, but I didn't want to ruin it for anyone.

Ok... Given three values stored in registers NUM1, NUM2, and NUM3, the
routine finds the minimum value and stores it in RESULT, leaving
NUM1-3 unchanged.

Here's the commented version of my code; this should make it clear:

   ;NOTE:  In the comments below, "min(A,B)" means "the lesser of A
   ;       and B".

       MOVF    NUM1,W  ;Set the Carry flag if NUM1 is less than
       SUBWF   NUM2,W  ;NUM2.

       MOVF    NUM1,W  ;Assume that NUM1 was less than NUM2.  This
                       ;instruction does NOT affect the Carry flag.

       SKPC            ;If NUM1 really was less than NUM2, skip
                       ;ahead with W = NUM1.

       MOVF    NUM2,W  ;Otherwise, W = NUM2.

   ;At this point, W contains min(NUM1,NUM2).

       MOVWF   RESULT  ;Store it in RESULT.

   ;At this point, both W and RESULT contain min(NUM1,NUM2).

       SUBWF   NUM3,W  ;Set the Carry flag if W [which contains
                       ;min(NUM1,NUM2), remember] is less then NUM3.

   ;At this point, RESULT still holds min(NUM1,NUM2), but W now
   ;contains NUM3 - min(NUM1,NUM2).

       SKPC            ;If W really was less than NUM3, skip ahead.

       ADDWF   RESULT  ;Otherwise,
                       ;RESULT = RESULT + W
                       ;       = min(N1,N2) + W
                       ;       = min(N1,N2) + [NUM3 - min(N1,N2)]
                       ;       = NUM3.
                       ;

                       ;Note that I typed "min(N1,N2)" instead of
                       ;"min(NUM1,NUM2)".  Sorry... I ran out of
                       ;space and had to do that to keep the
                       ;formatting ;pretty.

   ;At this point, RESULT holds min(NUM3,min(NUM1,NUM2)), which is
   ;of course equivalent to min(NUM1,NUM2,NUM3).

Did that help?

-Andy

P.S.  I hope this also explains why I said in an earlier message that
     assembly-language programmers need to understand the basic
     arithmetic axioms of association, commutation, and
     distribution.

=== Andrew Warren - TakeThisOuTfastfwdEraseMEspamspam_OUTix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering, Vista, California
=== http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499

'ISBN-number of PIC Book'
1997\03\15@050334 by Mwa.Dekkers

flavicon
face
Does anyone have the ISBN-number of the Easy pic'n book, as well as the
writer's name and publishers-name, so i can order the book ?


Max Dekkers

'Teaching by Example (was: "Re: PIC Book")'
1997\03\16@235716 by tjaart

flavicon
face
Andrew Warren wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Touche! I visited a major local company some time ago and discovered
that they use a compiler that I personally found *many* bugs in.
(Even more than MPLABC <G>)

{Quote hidden}

I agree - as long as you know the basics before you start making
speeches. Otherwise you'd be asking people for a pre-written speech
because you don't want to reinvent the wheel.... Geez, how *that* one
really grates me!

--
Friendly Regards

Tjaart van der Walt
tjaartEraseMEspam.....wasp.co.za
_____________________________________________________________
| Another sun-deprived R&D Engineer slaving away in a dungeon |
|             WASP International  http://wasp.co.za           |
|             GSM and GPS value-added applications            |
|  Voice : +27-(0)11-622-8686   |   Fax : +27-(0)11-622-8686  |
|_____________________________________________________________|

1997\03\17@214545 by Steve Hardy

flavicon
face
I have added comments to each line...


> From: Andrew Warren <EraseMEfastfwdspamIX.NETCOM.COM>
>
> John Payson <RemoveMEPICLISTEraseMEspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:
>
> > How about this one [figure out what it does yourself :-)]
> >
> >         movf    Num1,w      w = n1
> >         movwf   Result      r = n1
> >
> >         movf    Num2,w      w = n2
> >         subwf   Result,w    w = n1 - n2
> >         btfss   C
> >          subwf  Result,f    if (n2 > n1) r = n1 - (n1 - n2) = n2
> >
> >         movf    Num3,w      w = n3
> >         subwf   Result,w    r = r - n3 = max(n1,n2) - n3
> >         btfss   C
> >          subwf  Result,f    if (n3 > max(n1,n2)) r = n3

thus result = max((unsigned chars) n1, n2, n3)

{Quote hidden}

                                 r = min(n2,n1) + n3 - min(n2,n1) = n3

thus result = min(n1, n2, n3).  Not exactly the same, Andy, but we
assume you meant SKPNC instead of SKPC.  I know I forget this
wierd Microchip convention all the time -- I'm so used to carry
meaning the answer was negative after a subtraction.

This is reminiscent of the XOR technique of swapping 2 or more bytes.
It basically works because there are operations (op) such that given
Z = X op Y, then if you know any two of X, Y or Z, then the third
value can be reconstructed.  ADD, SUB and XOR are such op's.  AND
and OR, on the other hand, fundamentally destroy information.

Regards,
SJH
Canberra, Australia

PS: I missed your subsequent post with 'the answer' so forgive me
if I'm correcting an already corrected oversight.

1997\03\19@020028 by Andrew Warren

face
flavicon
face
Steve Hardy <RemoveMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU> wrote:

> [John Payson's aesthetically pleasing code produces]
> max((unsigned chars) n1, n2, n3)
> ....

> [and Andy Warren's ugly-yet-shorter code produces] min(n1, n2, n3).
> Not exactly the same, Andy, but we assume you meant SKPNC instead
> of SKPC.

   No, I meant SKPC... I must have misread John's code; I thought
   it found the minimum.

   My apologies to anyone who was misled by my message; as Steve
   points out, you can make my code find the maximum, or make
   John's code find the minimum, by simply changing his BTFSSs to
   BTFSC or my SKPCs to SKPNCs.

   -Andy

=== Andrew Warren - RemoveMEfastfwdTakeThisOuTspamspamix.netcom.com
=== Fast Forward Engineering - Vista, California
===
=== Custodian of the PICLIST Fund -- For more info, see:
=== www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/2499/fund.html


'New PIC Book - FYI'
1997\08\24@140007 by David/Wanda Benson
flavicon
face
FYI - Information about our latest book, "PIC'n Up The Pace" is available
at our new website http://www.sq-1.com.  Thank you.
Dave & Wanda Benson @ Square 1


'Mike's PIC Book from McGraw-Hill?'
1998\03\16@072619 by Tom Handley
picon face
  In the recent flyer from McGraw-Hill's Engineering Book Club, they
mention a book on the reply card:

    "Save a bundle when you build, customize, program, and reprogram your
     own microcontrollers with":

     Programming and Customizing the PIC Microcontroller
     350pp, 110 illus, Hardcover, 3.5" Disk
     Pub Price $44.95
     Mem Price $35.95

    "More than 30 experiments and 10 projects show you PIC applications"

  Is this Mike's book? If so, congratulations to Mike as this is probably
reaching a large audience.

  - Tom

1998\03\17@084853 by Roberto G—mez

flavicon
face
Yes, This is THE BOOK and is really very good.
EraseMErobyspamspamspamBeGoneabaconet.com.ar
-----Original Message-----
De: RemoveMEPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTSTOPspamspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Para: Robby <Robby>
Fecha: Lunes 16 de Marzo de 1998 09:29
Asunto: Mike's PIC Book from McGraw-Hill?


{Quote hidden}


'best pic books'
1998\07\23@124111 by Vincent Chan
flavicon
face
hi,
       responding to the last message about the pic books. Besides the "Design
With Pic Microcontrollers", I found 3 more in amazon.  Which one of these 4
books is the best?  I already know assembly language for pc, but just very
little for pic.

They are the following:
Programming and Customizing the Pic Microcontroller; Michael Predko

EASY PIC'n, A Beginner's Guide to Using PIC16/17 Microcontrollers; David
Benson

PIC'n Up The Pace, PIC16/17 Microcontroller Applications Guide from Square
1 Electronics; David Benson

thanks.

1998\07\23@132501 by Mike Ghormley

flavicon
face
Vincent Chan wrote:

<SNIP>

> Programming and Customizing the Pic Microcontroller; Michael Predko

Could use a little editting, but the book has good solid examples and gives you
"the goods".  Recommended.

> EASY PIC'n, A Beginner's Guide to Using PIC16/17 Microcontrollers; David Benso
n

Seems to be written for an absolute beginner or a "complete idiot".  As an examp
le,
he wastes valuable space showing a program that sources LEDs because he thinks t
hat
the concept of a "0" turning ON an LED would be too advanced.  Then he turns aro
und
and gives pretty much the same program with the LED being sunk.  For my taste, I
didn't like it talking down to me.

> PIC'n Up The Pace, PIC16/17 Microcontroller Applications Guide from Square 1 >
Electronics; David Benson

After the bad experience with the first, I left the second alone.  No opinion.

Just my two pence.  YMMV.

Michael

*************************************************************************
When the way of the Tao is forgotten, kindness and ethics must be taught.
Men must learn to pretend to be wise and good.  --  Lao Tzu
*************************************************************************

1998\07\23@132650 by RCGipson

flavicon
face
vincent,
i have all three of the books.  you are familiar with assembly language
techniques, i would ask you how familiar are you with standard
microprocessor interfacing?  if you have some experience with
microcontrollers/microprocessors, myke's book is for you.

in my opinion, all three books have merit.  if i had to choose a book
for a non beginner to microprocessors, i would choose, "Programming and
Customizing the PIC Microcontroller".

Myke Predko's book begins by walking you through the internal operation
of the pic and ends up by discussing some very practicle projects and
the design process involved.  in the middle you learn the about the
unique aspects of the microchip processor.

i especially appreciated the apendices.  he has gathered some very
practicle information that helps pic newcomers avoid some common design
mistakes.

the other jewels in this boot are practicle, usable projets.  he
includes information on building a programmer and best of all, a pic
emulator.  there are also designs for an electronic thermometer, a
serial lcd interface and a small servo controller.

i have contacted myke (he subscribes to this list) and he has been more
than helpful when i asked questions about his book.

i regularly go into tech groups and teach testing and trouble shooting
procedures.  i recommend myke's book to all of those who have been
asking about the pic processor family.

"easy pik'n" and "pik'n up the pace" are good books, but i got more
practicle information out of "programming and customizing the pic
microcontroller".



roger gipson

1998\07\23@145328 by cousens

flavicon
face
I have both of these books,
Programming and Customizing the Pic Microcontroller; Michael Predko
and
EASY PIC'n, A Beginner's Guide to Using PIC16/17 Microcontrollers; David
Benson

Myke Predko's book is, in my opinion, the better book

--
Peter Cousens
email: spamBeGonecousensSTOPspamspamEraseMEher.forthnet.gr  phone: + 3081 380534
snailmail:  Folia, Agia Fotini, Karteros, Heraklion  Crete, Greece.

1998\07\23@162935 by Pedro Barrios

flavicon
face
I also have the two books.
I'm my opinion, for what it is worth, it's the other way around.

In Predko's book every time he tries to explain something he says,
"as can be seen in Figure X" and that's it. Actually the figure is even
more difficult to understand than the problem at hand.

I think that, from a beginners point of view, Easy Pic'n is a book
you can enjoy and get something useful out of it.

As I said, this is only my humble opinion.


Pedro

At 09:49 PM 7/23/98 +0300, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\07\24@091309 by J.Adams

picon face
I would highly recommend all three.  Mikes is a bit more in
depth with projects but the other two are great to learn
PIC basics with.  Order them all :-)

John Adams

At 09:49 AM 7/23/98 -0700, you wrote:
>hi,
>        responding to the last message about the pic books. Besides the
"Design
{Quote hidden}

John Adams ---------------------------- EraseMEelectronicsspamEraseMEpobox.com
http://pobox.com/~electronics ----------- Check out the H.W.S
Internet Guide to Electronics book as well. Links on my site.


'New PIC Book Released by Square 1 Electronics'
1999\01\21@185507 by Square 1 Electronics
flavicon
face
Hello PICLISTERS,

Many of you who subscribe to this list have asked me when our new book
would be released.  It is now available.  The title is "PIC'n Techniques"
and a complete table of contents and ordering information is located on our
web site URL  http://www.sq-1.com

Best regards to all,
Dave Benson


/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
Square 1 Electronics
P.O. Box 501
Kelseyville, CA 95451 USA
Voice (707) 279-8881
Fax (707) 279-8883
E-mail @spam@sqone@spam@spamspam_OUTpacific.net
http://www.sq-1.com

/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\


'Looking for used PIC book'
1999\04\19@162832 by John Nall
flavicon
face
part 0 16 bytes
</x-html>

1999\04\19@191156 by Tony Nixon

flavicon
picon face
> John Nall wrote:
>
> a beginner.  Being on a low budget, it would be good if someone has

Hi John,

If you cannot afford much, download a copy of PicNPoke, let me know the
key number and I will send you a key.

--
Best regards

Tony

PicNPoke - Multimedia 16F84 Beginners PIC Tools.

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email spamBeGonepicnpokespamKILLspamcdi.com.au


'[PICLIST] [PIC] Pic books'
2001\08\03@154241 by Nicolas Fournel
flavicon
face
Hi,

I'm totally new on PICs, I was about to order the following book:

Easy Pic'N : A Beginners Guide to Using Pic16/17 Microcontrollers from Square 1

when I  found those 2 on amazon.com which for about the same price seem to offer a lot more information on the topic:

- Programming & Customizing PICmicro Microcontrollers, 2nd Edition by Michael Predko
- PICmicro Microcontroller Pocket Reference by Michael Predko

Does anybody have experience with thoses books? Are the last two complementary or not ? Any other suggestion welcome !

Thanks,

Nicolas

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservspam_OUTspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\08\03@170807 by Nick Masluk

picon face
Hi,

I'm also new to PIC's, I thought I might be able to
figure them out with the datasheets, but having no
prior experience to microcontrollers or assembly
language I had no choice but to find a book.

I have Programming & Customizing PICmicro
Microcontrollers, 2nd Edition by Michael Predko, I
feel it is a rather good book, I can say that I am
starting to understand PIC's.  It covers a lot of
topics, and also includes a PCB for the "el cheapo"
programmer (I have not tried using it yet though, as I
already purchased a PICStart Plus), as well as a
CD-ROM with experiments/projects.

Although this is the only PIC book I have, so I can't
make any comparisons, but I do think it is a good
book.

--Nick


--- Nicolas Fournel <TakeThisOuTNicolas.Fournel.....spamTakeThisOuTFACTOR5.COM>
wrote:
{Quote hidden}

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger
http://phonecard.yahoo.com/

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservspamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\08\03@172408 by J. A.

picon face
I can highly recommend both. Easy Pic'N is more of a simple primer to get
started in PICs with and Myke's book can be a good continuation. The good
thing about Myke's book is that there are schematics for a cheap programmer
in it, I believe. I am actually re-reading both books myself to brush up on
ASM and PICs

Get yourself a cheap programmer and a few 16F84 chips, along with both books
and learn along.

Sincerely

John Adams
basicelectronics.com


{Quote hidden}

_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservEraseMEspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2001\08\04@010546 by Jeff DeMaagd

flavicon
face
----- Original Message -----
From: Nicolas Fournel <@spam@Nicolas.FournelRemoveMEspamEraseMEFACTOR5.COM>

> I'm totally new on PICs, I was about to order the following book:
>
> Easy Pic'N : A Beginners Guide to Using Pic16/17 Microcontrollers from
Square 1

I like the Square One books.  I have Easy PIC'n, PIC'n up the PACE and PIC'n
Techniques.  They helped me walk through assembly and the use of basic
control registers.  Their site has freely downloadable source, but it's all
clearly printed in the book, it's good to enter them yourself to get a feel
for the coding.  I felt it was easy to read and use, and the author does
answer emails, a great plus

I recommend ordering straight from http://www.sq-1.com/ as I heard Amazon
takes a steep bite for commissions, I think someone said about 40%, I
prefered to support the author / publisher more directly.

I'm sure the other guy's books are probably good too, but I have no
experience with them.

I have no association with Square One other than having bought their books.

Jeff

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
EraseMEpiclist-unsubscribe-requestspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu


2001\08\04@020952 by Joe Valdez

picon face
I too have bought the Square One books on PICs, in fact, I have the complete
set and they have been invaluable in learning about PICs.
I also bought PIC N Poke, which I believe is called something else and sold
by Bubble Software.


I have no association with either Bubble Software, or Square One other than
having bought their software and books.

Joe

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
@spam@piclist-unsubscribe-requestspam_OUTspam.....mitvma.mit.edu


2001\08\04@145143 by John Ferrell

flavicon
face
Easy PIC'n is very elementary, that makes it pretty time efficient.  8 x 10
inches, 1/2 in thick.

Programming & Customizing PICmicro Microcontrollers, 2nd Edition by Michael
Predko
Is very thorough. It also has a CD with much code already keyed in and ready
to go. There is also a PC board if you would care to build your own PIC
programmer.
9 x 7 inches, 1-1/2 inches thick.  An awful lot for your money!

I don't know about the other book.

Both of these have been very useful to me.

John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"



{Original Message removed}

2001\08\06@023344 by Adlam Frank

flavicon
face
People always ask which books are available for the PIC.  I had to make a
list - can as well share it with you.  If you know of any PIC book on this
list, please let me know.  Hope it helps.

Title:  PIC Trix
Author: P Ellis
ISBN:           0-620-23694-9
Publisher:      ?

Title:  Pictutor (Multimedia)
Author: J Becker
URL:            Http://Www.Matrixmultimedia.Co.Uk/Picprods.Htm
Publisher:      Matrix Multimedia

Title:  TCP/IP Lean: Web Servers For Embedded Systems
Author: J Bentham
ISBN:           1-929629-11-7 (Pbk)
Publisher:      Cmp Books, C2000

Title:  Design With Pic Microcontrollers
Author: Jb Peatman
ISBN:           0-13-759259-0
Publisher:      Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, C1997

Title:  Sample PIC C Routines Using The CCS PCW Compiler
Author: Ph Anderson
ISBN:
Publisher:

Title:  PIC: Your Personal Introductory Course
Author: J Morton
ISBN:           0-7506-3932-6 (Pbk)
Publisher:      Oxford: G. Newnes, C1998

Title:  Pic Microcontroller Project Book
Author: J Iovine
ISBN:           0-07-135479-4 (Pbk)
Publisher:      New York, N.Y.: Mcgraw-Hill, C2000

Title:  PIC In Practice: An Introduction To The PIC Microcontroller
Author: D Smith
ISBN:           0-7506-4812-0 (Pbk)
Publisher:      London: Butterworth-Heinemann, C2001

Title:  Programming And Customizing The PIC Microcontroller
Author: M Predko
ISBN:           0-07-913645-1 Or  0-07-91364
Publisher:      Mcgraw-Hill

Title:  PIC'N Techniques (PIC Microcontroller Applications Guide)
Author: D Benson
ISBN:           0-9654162-3-2
Publisher:      Square 1 Electronics

Title:  PIC'N Up The Pace (PIC Microcontroller Applications Guide)
Author: D Benson
ISBN:           0-9654162-1-6
Publisher:      Square 1 Electronics

Title:  Serial PIC'N (PIC Microcontroller Serial Communications)
Author: RL Stevens
ISBN:           0-9654162-2-4
Publisher:      Square 1 Electronics

Title:  Easy PIC'N  (Beginners Guide To PIC16/17 Microcontrollers)
Author: D Benson
ISBN:           0-9654162-0-8
Publisher:      Square 1 Electronics

Title:  An Introduction To PIC Microcontrollers
Author: RA Penfold
ISBN:           0-85934-394-4
Publisher:      Babani Electronics Books

Title:  Practical PIC Microcontroller Projects
Author: RA Penfold
ISBN:           0-85934-444-4
Publisher:      Babani Electronics Books

Title:  A Beginners Guide To The Microchip PIC 2nd Edition
Author: N Gardner
ISBN:           1-899013-01-6
Publisher:      Mps Maplin Professional

Title:  PIC Cookbook
Author: N Gardner
ISBN:           1-899013-02-4
Publisher:      Mps Maplin Professional

Frank Adlam
Senior Lecturer
Faculty of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering
Port Elizabeth Technikon
Private Bag X6011
Port Elizabeth
6000
South Africa

Please note that our mail server does not accept files with an EXE
extension.  Please rename the files with such an extension and inform me in
the body of the e-mail about the changes.

{Original Message removed}

2001\08\07@082750 by philip chan

flavicon
face
Hi, Adlam,

Thank you for sharing, it was very timely.
I just bought a PIC kit and a book by
"Programming & Customizing PICmicro Microcontrollers, 2nd Edition by
Michael Predko".

Totally new in PIC hardware or software.
This first book was very well written and structured.
A bit too heavy for a newbies. Waiting for PIC'n from sq-1, hope it will
break the ice.

Thanks again.
philip

----- Original Message -----
From: "Adlam Frank" <spamBeGoneFADLAMEraseMEspamPETECH.AC.ZA>
To: <PICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Monday, August 06, 2001 2:27 PM
Subject: Re: [PIC] Pic books


{Quote hidden}

in
> the body of the e-mail about the changes.
>
> {Original Message removed}


'[PICLIST] PIC Book'
2001\10\29@003409 by uuq
flavicon
face
Hello,

I am a beginner with PIC & am after a book's ISBN no and Publishing Co of:

Easy Pic'N : A Beginners Guide to Using Pic16/17 Microcontrollers from Square 1

by David Benson"

Help requested from all.

uuq

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


2001\10\29@010438 by Jose Samonte

picon face
Look at this... :-)

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0965416208/qid=1004335268/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1_1/002-2442266-9004000

Have a nice day!!!
God Bless All the nice people of PICList!!!


{Quote hidden}

_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


2001\10\29@011930 by Josh Koffman

flavicon
face
Or go right to the source at http://www.sq-1.com . By the way, it's a
great book in case anyone is wondering. I just wish I could afford a
copy of Serial PIC'n. Anyone have a used one they want to get rid of?

Josh Koffman

uuq wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads



'[PICLIST] Recent PIC book and C compiler'
2002\06\24@122319 by Derek Cowburn
flavicon
face
Can anyone recommend a "PIC-for-beginners" book that has been updated to
include examples using the latest ICP Flash PICs?

Also, any recommendations on inexpensive C compilers and C IDEs?

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email .....listservSTOPspamspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body


2002\06\24@124646 by Josh Koffman

flavicon
face
I highly reccommend the books by David Benson at Square 1 Electronics.
Easy PIC'n doesn't deal with ICP, but I believe the new Easy DeBug'n
companion book does. Not totally sure though. Email David and find out
for sure. The website is: http://www.sq-1.com . I really really want the
Serial PIC'n book, but I can't afford it right now...unless anyone has a
used one for sale :)

Hope this helps,

Josh
--
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something
completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete
fools.
       -Douglas Adams

Derek Cowburn wrote:
> Can anyone recommend a "PIC-for-beginners" book that has been updated to
> include examples using the latest ICP Flash PICs?

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservEraseMEspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body



'recommended PIC books?'
2004\04\21@194822 by Wouter van Ooijen
face picon face
I will be teaching a course in assembler programming on 14-bit core
PICs, for ~ 19y old students Informatica (~ computer engineer / computer
science). Can you recommend a book? These guys do know the basics of
binary artithmetic, digital electronics etc, so it can be just PIC
architecture and assembly.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\04\21@200103 by Tom

flavicon
face
Not exactly a book but a good learning tool: MPLAB.

Write code, run the simulator, see what happens. For people who "know the
basics of
binary artithmetic, digital electronics etc," I think it will immediately
produce good, quick, foward progress.  Many, many questions to the piclist
could be answered more quickly by simply typing a few lines into MPLAB and
finding out how some instruction really works.

From what I understand, your JAL system would be a good follow on to MPLAB
and assembly code.

Absolute beginners might need more of a text book but the people you
describe should really take off by actual hands-on mode.

Just a guess.
HTH,
Tom


At 01:50 AM 4/22/04 +0200, you wrote:
>I will be teaching a course in assembler programming on 14-bit core
>PICs, for ~ 19y old students Informatica (~ computer engineer / computer
>science). Can you recommend a book? These guys do know the basics of
>binary artithmetic, digital electronics etc, so it can be just PIC
>architecture and assembly.
>
>Wouter van Ooijen
>

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\04\21@204138 by M. Adam Davis

flavicon
face
The only book I have looked through that would apply is Myke Predko's
Programming and Customizing the PICMicro Microcontroller:
http://www.myke.com/pic-book.htm

It covers the basics ( a chapter to each):
Microcontrollers
Microchip PICmicro
PICmicro architecture
Instruction set
Hardware features

And then goes through another 12 chapters on various other aspects.
It's a large book (1200 or so pages) and it isn't cheap, but it's less
expensive than most textbooks I've had to buy for school.

There are other books available that cover the PIC and are meant for
general courses in embedded design.  I simply can't offer an opinion
since I haven't seen them.

Hope this helps!

-Adam

Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\04\21@213302 by Robert L Cochran

flavicon
face
I cannot recommend this book. I have it myself. The book comes with a
PCB for building his "El Cheapo" PIC programmer, but the software to
support the programmer does not install on some people's computers, most
probably because it wasn't compiled with Visual Studio 6 Service Pack 5
or later. In fact his El Cheapo version 0.84 software does not install
on my Windows 2000 (Service Pack 4 and all current patches) system.

I admit that I have not seriously used the book itself, but I did set
out to build the El Cheapo programmer (this was last summer), and was
very disappointed when the software would not install. Myke Predko, for
whatever reason, did not respond to my emails asking for support with this.

I've heard from other sources that Predko was seriously ill at some
point, but have not heard from Predko himself.

So if you buy this book, you are gambling that Predko's software will
install on your computer. If it does not, Predko will not support you.
So sorry. Your USD $52 for the book plus around another USD $20 for the
parts kit (mine is from kitsrus.com and glitchbuster.com also sells a
kit) will be wasted.

Not recommended. Two thumbs down.

Bob Cochran


M. Adam Davis wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
Bob Cochran
Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
http://greenbeltcomputer.biz/

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\04\21@214337 by Kevin Olalde

flavicon
face
Just a word of warning.  I have that book, it has a rather large number
of errors in it.  I asked the author about the errors, and he mentioned
that I must have the first printing of the second edition.  A number of
things were correct in later printings I'm told.

Thanks,
Kevin

M. Adam Davis wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads

2004\04\22@015124 by William Dillon

flavicon
face
I've used this book to teach PIC students this winter, and a little this
spring (seasons are in terms of northern hemisphere :) ) I thought it
was successful, and had alot of information.  It is a bit verbose, so I
would pick parts of each section and assign them as reading.  I would
not, however encourage using the programming examples.  Also if you can
find a source for parts to make the programmer (El Cheapo) more cost
effective it is a good way for the students to have all the tools to
develop with the PIC's (mental and programming).

I hope this isn't too rambling...

-Will


Kevin Olalde wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@015538 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I cannot recommend this book.
> I admit that I have not seriously used the book itself

As said I have the book and I like it, but I never build the progger.

> So if you buy this book, you are gambling that Predko's software will
> install on your computer.

No. I would actually buy it for the text :)

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@015539 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> The only book I have looked through that would apply is Myke Predko's
> Programming and Customizing the PICMicro Microcontroller

I have that book and I like it, but IMHO it is less fit for this
particular purpose.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@015540 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Not exactly a book but a good learning tool: MPLAB.

Of course, it is the standard so I did not even consider using something
else.

> From what I understand, your JAL system would be a good
> follow on to MPLAB and assembly code.

No Jal (at least for this course).

> Absolute beginners might need more of a text book but the people you
> describe should really take off by actual hands-on mode.

It will be split theory / hands-on lessons, with the first hands-on
after 1.5 hour of talking.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@015953 by Shawn Wilton

flavicon
face
Stick with data sheets.  There are few books out there that are worth
spending money on.  Seriously.


Shawn Wilton
Junior in CpE
MicroBiologist

Phone: (503) 881-2707
Email: RemoveMEshawnspamspamBeGoneblack9.net

http://black9.net


Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@015954 by Shawn Wilton

flavicon
face
That book sucks.  Half the code in the book is wrong.  Again, data
sheets and example (free) code are the only way to go.


Shawn Wilton
Junior in CpE
MicroBiologist

Phone: (503) 881-2707
Email: spamBeGoneshawnKILLspamspam@spam@black9.net

http://black9.net


Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@022313 by Robert B.

flavicon
face
I learned most of the basics from Predko's "Programming and Customizing PIC
Microcontrollers", and found it to be very instructive.  I never built the
el-cheapo or installed any software.  It took me from knowing nothing about
microcontrollers to understanding most of the basics pretty quickly.  I
never tried to use any of the code, but rather just read it for
understanding then moved on.  I agree datasheets are the best reference, but
for the uninitiated they are pretty intimidating.  Looking back, I doubt the
book was worth the $ I spent on it, but I do reference it occasionally for a
broader overview of chip architecture or some feature I've never used
before.


{Original Message removed}

2004\04\22@025011 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Wednesday, Apr 21, 2004, at 23:22 US/Pacific, Robert B. wrote:

>
> I learned most of the basics from Predko's "Programming and
> Customizing PIC Microcontrollers", and found it to be very > instructive.

I found it useful too, and "not too expensive" compared to the average
textbook.  (Going to college will change your mind about bookprices
forever.  Dropping $70 on a book that you're not interested in, for a
class you have to take, is just ... depressing.  $35 technical books
will seem like a bargin, and $8 paperback fiction will get snapped up.)

It does tend to ramble into other architectures (PIC17, 12 bit cores,
etc.) (that was one of the reasons I liked it, but it's less than ideal
for an intro class that's going to focus on A particular chip.)

What you're really looking for is something along the lines of
"Introduction to microcontrollers and embedded programming, featuring
the PIC18F452", or something like that?  I don't recall seeing any such
thing :-(

BillW

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@060001 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I've used this book to teach PIC students this winter
> (snip)
> I hope this isn't too rambling...

No, definitely not. I want a book for education, not for the progger PCB
that might be with it. Actual education experience like yours is exactly
what I am looking for. Thanx.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@081305 by Matt Marsh

flavicon
face
While we're on this topic I thought I'd give some info
on the couple of books that I've been reading over the
last couple of months as I've been learning PIC programming,
though note that neither of these are likely suitable for
your needs... but might be useful for others...

I should point out that my background coming into learning
PIC programming is purely software related. I've been
programming software for years, but my electronics
experience is very limited, I knew the basics of what
various components do and the basics of Ohm's law, but
that's about it.

The first book that got me started was "PIC: Your Personal
Introductory Course" by John Morton. I found this book
easy to read and got me started in a gentle way. It didn't
require me to have a big understanding of electronics
and so I was usually able to understand the circuits that
were being constructed with ease. Where this book does
fall down though is that it's a little old and doesn't
cover the more recent chips. That's not to say that it isn't
useful, just that it doesn't cover all the newest peripherals
etc, and of course you need to have a good read of the
datasheet to get the programs working with later chips.
Also, some of the techniques that this book teaches are a
little dubious in places. For example, when saving the
state of the STATUS register on an interrupt, it just uses
movf instructions instead of swapf. Also in a number of
places the circuits show draw far too much current through
the PIC pins than should be done... and these are just the
things I've noticed as very much of a newbie.

The other book that I'm reading at the moment is "Designing
Embedded Hardware" by John Catsoulis. This isn't a PIC
programming book, though it does include chapters on PICs
and other processors (AVRs, Motorolla 68K). I've only read
the first few chapters, but it's certainly interesting so
far... it was a big help for someone like me to have a
chapter at the start explaining basic electronic concepts
and circuits, and now I'm moving onto chapters explaining
all about building circuits etc. It seems like a good book
for giving a grounding in creating embedded circuits and I'm
certainly looking forward to the later chapters where the
book gets onto communication mechanisms such as SPI, I2C
and even ethernet and USB.

Hope this might help someone.

Matt

--
Matt N. Marsh
Email: mattspam_OUTspam@spam@mattmarsh.net          Yahoo: marshmn
 Web: http://www.mattmarsh.net/  Jabber: spamBeGonemattmarsh@spam@spamjabber.org
                                    MSN: RemoveMEmattEraseMEspamKILLspammattmarsh.net
                                    ICQ: 250467363
                                    AIM: MattMarshUK

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@103054 by michael brown

picon face
From: "Wouter van Ooijen"

> I will be teaching a course in assembler programming on 14-bit core
> PICs, for ~ 19y old students Informatica (~ computer engineer /
computer
> science). Can you recommend a book? These guys do know the basics of
> binary artithmetic, digital electronics etc, so it can be just PIC
> architecture and assembly.

The first book I used when starting out was by John Peatman.  It's the
'Design with PIC Microcontrollers' book.  I still find it quite useful
though it is a bit dated.  It's probably the best book I own as far as
microcontroller programming goes.  It's clear and concise with lots of
practical examples and information.

He now has a new book centering on the 18F452.  I haven't purchased this
book yet, but I wouldn't hesitate to buy it based upon my experience
with his first PIC book.

http://www.picbook.com

In fact I think I'll order it now since I need to get up to speed on the
452.  US $69.00 at Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0130462136/

michael brown

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@124746 by Andrew Warren

flavicon
face
Matt Marsh <spamBeGonePICLISTspam_OUTspamRemoveMEmitvma.mit.edu> wrote:

> Also, some of the techniques that this book teaches are a little
> dubious in places. For example, when saving the state of the STATUS
> register on an interrupt, it just uses movf instructions instead of
> swapf.

   That's perfectly ok.  If the interrupt-service routine ends in
   the usual way (by restoring STATUS and then restoring W), then
   SWAPF is only required when restoring W.

   -Andy

=== Andrew Warren -- .....aiwspamRemoveMEcypress.com
=== Principal Design Engineer
=== Cypress Semiconductor Corporation
===
=== Opinions expressed above do not
=== necessarily represent those of
=== Cypress Semiconductor Corporation

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@124950 by William Dillon

flavicon
face
Strangely enough, I wish I could find a book like that for my class...

I am teaching college students about the PIC in relation to a computer
architecture class, sort of as a hands-on example.  I've found the 16
series chip to be a little more challenging for the students to work
with, the 'quirks' of the 16 series can sometimes get in the way of a
concept.  What is holding me, and my advisor, from moving up to the 18
series is the lack of a good book to work from.


William Chops Westfield wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@131954 by Matt Marsh

flavicon
face
On Thursday 22 April 2004 17:49, Andrew Warren wrote:
> Matt Marsh <PICLISTspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu> wrote:
> > Also, some of the techniques that this book teaches are a
> > little dubious in places. For example, when saving the state of
> > the STATUS register on an interrupt, it just uses movf
> > instructions instead of swapf.
>
>     That's perfectly ok.  If the interrupt-service routine ends
> in the usual way (by restoring STATUS and then restoring W), then
> SWAPF is only required when restoring W.

ah, sorry, I should have said that the book is storing/restoring
both STATUS and W... and uses no SWAPF instructions...

Matt

--
Matt N. Marsh
Email: EraseMEmattRemoveMEspamSTOPspammattmarsh.net          Yahoo: marshmn
 Web: http://www.mattmarsh.net/  Jabber: RemoveMEmattmarshKILLspamspamTakeThisOuTjabber.org
                                    MSN: spamBeGonemattspam@spam@mattmarsh.net
                                    ICQ: 250467363
                                    AIM: MattMarshUK

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

'[PIC:] Re: recommended PIC books?'
2004\04\22@134548 by Mike Hord

picon face
The Peatman book IS a bit dated, but for 14-bit core chips not too much
has changed.  The real difference between modern 14-bit core chips and
the ones Peatman wrote about is that now they are Flash programmable.

I'd recommend it highly.  I still use mine regularly.  Good coverage of
things like interfacing LCDs, keypads, etc.  The Peatman 18F452 book is
exemplary.  It comes with a "demo board" that has space for a DAC, LCD,
MAX232, and some other really neat peripheral components...definitely
the book I'd use if I were to teach a class on the 16-bit core.

Mike H.

{Quote hidden}

_________________________________________________________________
Test your  Travel Quotient  and get the chance to win your dream trip!
http://travel.msn.com

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

'recommended PIC books?'
2004\04\22@150020 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> What you're really looking for is something along the lines of
> "Introduction to microcontrollers and embedded programming, featuring
> the PIC18F452", or something like that?  I don't recall
> seeing any such
> thing :-(

Nor do I, but I prefere datasheets, so I don't know which books are
available, and I certainly have not read them.

I did think about which core to use, I would have preffered 18F, except
for the larger instruction set and the lack of small chips. Maybe I'll
even stick to 12-bit, there are flash 12-bit core chips popping up from
'future product' status to 'in stock', an I understand the 6-pin 10F's
will be 12 bit too.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@150021 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Stick with data sheets.  There are few books out there that are worth
> spending money on.  Seriously.

For me personally I agree, but I am not so sure for a first year
student, who has had his first serious contact with C or Java just a few
months ago.

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@181658 by Robert L Cochran

flavicon
face
How about:

Networking and Internetworking with Microcontrollers, by Fred Eady

I have not read this book but plan to order it soon.

Bob Cochran

Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
Bob Cochran
Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
http://greenbeltcomputer.biz/

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

'[PIC:] Re: recommended PIC books?'
2004\04\22@181905 by Robert L Cochran

flavicon
face
How about:

Networking and Internetworking with Microcontrollers, by Fred Eady

I have not read this book but plan to order it soon.

Bob Cochran


Mike Hord wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
Bob Cochran
Greenbelt, Maryland, USA
http://greenbeltcomputer.biz/

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

2004\04\22@185302 by Shawn Wilton

flavicon
face
Nothing personal, but how can you recommend a book you haven't read.  ;-)

Robert L Cochran wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

'recommended PIC books?'
2004\04\23@015050 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Thursday, Apr 22, 2004, at 12:02 US/Pacific, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:

>
>> What you're really looking for is something along the lines of
>> "Introduction to microcontrollers and embedded programming, featuring
>> the PIC18F452", or something like that?  I don't recall
>> seeing any such thing :-(
>
> Nor do I, but I prefere datasheets, so I don't know which books are
> available, and I certainly have not read them.
>
>
Didn't someone post some microchip training docs once?  Oh yeah:

http://techtrain.microchip.com/masters2003/(c1xuow55dt0yvl3t0zcci245)/
masters2003-CD/classes/701/701_PIC.pdf

I dunno whether you're supposed to use it, but it looked pretty
reasonable last time I checked.  You might see whether microchip is
willing to allow you to use it, or perhaps even has a more handout-like
document to go with it...

there does seem to be a lot more at:
http://techtrain.microchip.com/masters2003/(jd3g1drdsjvjqe550svzio55)/
masters2003-CD/index.htm

The Peatman book looks promising as well, though perhaps too advanced
for your target audience (described as a "senior level" class.  OTOH,
"senior level" is about when you stop learning heavy math and start
having fun, so maybe it'd be OK...)

BillW

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.

2004\04\23@021134 by Colin Constant

picon face
>From: William Chops Westfield <RemoveMEwestfwspam_OUTspamMAC.COM>
>Didn't someone post some microchip training docs once?  Oh yeah:
>
>http://techtrain.microchip.com/masters2003

Anyone we know in that photo gallery?

_________________________________________________________________
Tired of spam? Get advanced junk mail protection with MSN Premium
http://join.msn.com/?pgmarket=en-ca&page=byoa/prem&xAPID=1994&DI=1034&SU=http://hotmail.com/enca&HL=Market_MSNIS_Taglines

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.

2004\04\23@023001 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Networking and Internetworking with Microcontrollers, by Fred Eady

From the title I would not guess that the focus is on as programming of
PICs. Is it?

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.

2004\04\23@032514 by Rob Hamerling

flavicon
face
[about Predko's book]

Kevin Olalde wrote:
> Just a word of warning.  I have that book, it has a rather large number
> of errors in it.  I asked the author about the errors, and he mentioned
> that I must have the first printing of the second edition.  A number of
> things were correct in later printings I'm told.

This book (apparently first print of the second edition) was my first
intro to PICs. If it hadn't had an enourmous amount of errors I would
have considered it a good book. I have put an errata sheet on my site,
but it contains only the errors I found myself, so it is probably far
from complete! http://www.robh.nl/picsoft.htm#predko

Regards, Rob.

--
Rob Hamerling, Vianen, NL phone +31-347-322822
homepage: http://www.robh.nl/

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


'recommended PIC books?'
2004\05\04@170057 by Michael O'Donnell
flavicon
face
I have been trying to find the ideal PIC book for the last few months... I have looked at lots of them in stores, but decided to go with C rather than learning assembler.

One that I looked at and thought looked good (but didn't purchase and read thoroughly) was PIC in Practice by  David Smith. It was organized around a classroom course and might be just what you are looking for.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0750648120/qid=1083703627/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-2062674-2396119?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

cheers,
mike

William Dillon <dilwil21spamspamEVERGREEN.EDU> wrote:
Strangely enough, I wish I could find a book like that for my class...

I am teaching college students about the PIC in relation to a computer
architecture class, sort of as a hands-on example. I've found the 16
series chip to be a little more challenging for the students to work
with, the 'quirks' of the 16 series can sometimes get in the way of a
concept. What is holding me, and my advisor, from moving up to the 18
series is the lack of a good book to work from.


William Chops Westfield wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spam_OUTlistservspam_OUTspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\05\04@170519 by D. Jay Newman

flavicon
face
> One that I looked at and thought looked good (but didn't purchase and read thoroughly) was PIC in Practice by  David Smith. It was organized around a classroom course and might be just what you are looking for.

I know that many people feel differently, but I think that it's a good idea
to learn assembler language as a student. For the PIC it's fairly easy.

When I'm not using a stamp-type PIC I generally use assembler.
--
D. Jay Newman           !
jayspam_OUTspamsprucegrove.com     ! Xander: Giles, don't make cave-slayer unhappy.
http://enerd.ws/robots/ !

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email RemoveMElistservKILLspamspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

'[OT:] Re: recommended PIC books? / ASM versus C ra'
2004\05\04@171348 by Shawn Wilton

flavicon
face
I would concur.  Especially since most platforms require purchasing a
3rd party compiler which typically costs in excess of $400.  I would
love to work with PIC's in C, but it's not worth purchasing a compiler.

I know many will say HiTech has a free lite version, but what's the
point if I'm limited to 5 different chips, none of which match the ones
I actually have.

Now if you use AVR, that's an entirely different story.  You can use GCC
there and that's a really powerful tool.  Thing is you still have to
know ASM for some of the more obscure things such as timing routines, etc.

No matter what, you *need* to know asm.

-Shawn


D. Jay Newman wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email spam_OUTlistservspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\05\04@172346 by D. Jay Newman

flavicon
face
> I would concur.  Especially since most platforms require purchasing a
> 3rd party compiler which typically costs in excess of $400.  I would
> love to work with PIC's in C, but it's not worth purchasing a compiler.
...
> No matter what, you *need* to know asm.

> D. Jay Newman wrote:
>
> > I know that many people feel differently, but I think that it's a good idea
> > to learn assembler language as a student. For the PIC it's fairly easy.

Perhaps I should clarify my remark. I think that students should learn
assembler language for two reasons:

1. It gets you *much* closer to the machine and you learn more deeply
  how computers work. A pointer in C is a fairly abstract concept
  compared to its equivilent in assembler code.

2. When taught alongside more traditional programming courses the student
  should learn that assembler is to be avoided unless necessary.

I use assember on the PIC because:

1. It's easy. There aren't that many instructions and they are fairly
  straight forward.

2. It's free.

However, I do tend to use stamp-type PICs such as the Kronos Robotics Dios
chip (sort-of Basic) and the uVM chips (Java).

I use these chips for robotics, and I find that higher-level concepts are
more easily programmed using higher level languages.

For purely device-driver chips, on the other hand, I go right to the core
of the matter if I have the time.
--
D. Jay Newman           !
RemoveMEjayRemoveMEspamEraseMEsprucegrove.com     ! Xander: Giles, don't make cave-slayer unhappy.
http://enerd.ws/robots/ !

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email KILLspamlistservspamspamBeGonemitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\05\04@173559 by Paul James E.

picon face
All,

I have stated several time here before that I personally prefer assembly
language.   I have tried 'C' and 'BASIC' compilers, and they are okay.
But I always come back to assembly.   And I have been using assembly now
for so long that I believe I can write a routine, (or application) in about
the same time as someone using one of the HLL's.   It may take me a little
bit longer, but not much, if any.

And no, I probably won't get rid of my 'C' and 'BASIC' compilers just yet
as I do maintain a couple of programs at work, and one of the is in 'C',
and the other is in 'BASIC', so I do need them.   But as soon as I get
caught up at work (if that ever happens), I plan to rewrite the 'C'
and 'BASIC' routines in assembly, then I'll get rid of the compilers.

Anyway, the bottom line is PIC assembly is simple.   At least I have found
it to be anyway.   And as was stated in a previous reply, assembly will
usually need to be known to write some timing critical code at some point
in ones application.   And it's rather fun, (at least in my book) to have
a challenge before you of writing something in assembly that works in a
certain way, and having it actually work like you want it to.  To me, this
is very satisfying.   Using an HLL takes some of the challenge away as far
as I'm concerned.

My advice is learn assembly.   When you use it, you'll be glad you learned
it.   If you never use it, then you must be a really good programmer,(Or
a really bad programmer).   But I really believe that once you learn it,
you won't regret it.   Typically with a PIC, you only have 35 instructions
to learn.  It's not that difficult.

                                     Whatever you do, good luck.

                                               Regards,

                                                 Jim




{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email @spam@listservSTOPspamspam@spam@mitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

2004\05\04@174221 by Mike Harrison

flavicon
face
On Tue, 4 May 2004 14:13:44 -0700, you wrote:

>I would concur.  Especially since most platforms require purchasing a
>3rd party compiler which typically costs in excess of $400.  I would
>love to work with PIC's in C, but it's not worth purchasing a compiler.
>
>I know many will say HiTech has a free lite version, but what's the
>point if I'm limited to 5 different chips, none of which match the ones
>I actually have.
>
>Now if you use AVR, that's an entirely different story.  You can use GCC
>there and that's a really powerful tool.  Thing is you still have to
>know ASM for some of the more obscure things such as timing routines, etc.
>
>No matter what, you *need* to know asm.

Absolutely. You will never write efficient C on a small microcontroller if you don't have the sort
of understanding of the hardware that only programming in assembler can give you.  
--
http://www.piclist.com#nomail Going offline? Don't AutoReply us!
email listservspamBeGonespamspamBeGonemitvma.mit.edu with SET PICList DIGEST in the body

'] Re: recommended PIC books? / ASM versus C rant'
2004\05\05@170723 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> No matter what, you *need* to know asm.

Make that "you need to *know* asm" (in most cases no need to *use* it).

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: To leave the PICList
spamBeGonepiclist-unsubscribe-requestspammitvma.mit.edu

2004\05\06@001644 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Wednesday, May 5, 2004, at 14:04 US/Pacific, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>
> Make that "you need to *know* asm" (in most cases no need to *use* it).
>
That sounds about right.  I'm quite enjoying avoiding all those banking
and paging issues by using the one of the freeware version C compilers,
and I'm impressed with the small percentage of memory used by the
things that I'm wanting to do at the moment, but I can't imagine being
able to create C programs for a PIC without some significant
understanding of the chip architectures, which tend to be 'described'
in asm...

BillW

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


'[PIC] PIC book is deal of the day...'
2008\01\24@083052 by William Couture
face picon face
>From DODTRACKER.COM

The book
  " 123 PIC microcontroller experiments for the evil genius"
is the deal of the day at bookcellersales.com

https://bookcellarsales.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=422

Bill

--
Psst...  Hey, you... Buddy...  Want a kitten?  straycatblues.petfinder.org


'[AD] PIC BOOKS FOR SALE'
2010\02\13@200350 by BOB
picon face
I have the following books for sale:

EASY MICROCONTROL'N  A beginner's guide to using PIC microcontrollers
new cost $34.95

TIME'N and CONTROL'N  using PIC microcontrollers.     New cost $34.95.

MICROCONTROL'N APPS  PIC microcontroller applications guide.   New
cost$44.95.

I bought these new from SQUARE 1 several years ago and due to heart and
other health problems I hardly even cracked the covers.  They are in
like new condition. The only thing is I have my name and address stamped
in side the front cover of each book.  I loaned out several books over
the years and it is suprising that after 2 long time old friends passed
away the families returned about 6 of my books.

I have no further use for these.  I am open to offers on them. They are
like new condition.

I would be very interested in trading them for the books "EASY STEP'N
and  EASY CNC  by the same company and author.

Bob Nelson

2010\02\14@223752 by Vitaliy

face
flavicon
face
BOB wrote:
>I have the following books for sale:

Have you considered posting them on Amazon?

Vitaliy

2010\02\15@075749 by BOB

picon face
I have only looked at AMAZON a couple of times I was not aware that an
individule could sell an item there.

Thank you for the reply.
Bob

Vitaliy wrote:
> BOB wrote:
>  
>> I have the following books for sale:
>>    
>
> Have you considered posting them on Amazon?
>
> Vitaliy
>  

2010\02\15@115633 by Scott Zielinski

flavicon
face


On 2/14/2010 9:36 PM, Vitaliy wrote:
> BOB wrote:
>    
>> I have the following books for sale:
>>      
> Have you considered posting them on Amazon?
>
> Vitaliy
>    
Or eBay. I've picked up  couple of controller books there. Half.com I
think my be a better option - as I think more people go there for things
like books. Either one should be good.

z

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2010 , 2011 only
- Today
- New search...