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'[PICLIST] [PIC}: Ideas for using PIC with 1 Gig Mi'
2001\03\07@121602 by Ellen Spertus

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www.piclist.com/postbot.asp?id=piclist\2001\03\06\183702a

My understanding (perhaps incorrect) is that CCD and other small cheap
cameras produce compositve video output and that converting from analog
video formats to digital formats is difficult.  The cheapest solution I've
found is to use a WinTV card, but that would require PCI bus mastering,
etc.  Is there an easy way to convert the output of a cheap camera to
some digital form (perhaps for later postprocessing)?  I like the idea of
a crittercam.

Ellen

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2001\03\07@125538 by Steve Bergerson

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The quick answer is yes

Very easy to do actually.

I will send you the details later.

From Steve
Not all heroes wear tights and a cape.

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2001\03\07@155039 by Dal Wheeler

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Well, maybe you could just take snap shots with one of those cheap 320x200
serial cameras? (mattel barbie cam?)  --Gameboy camera hack?  It's probably
unlikely you'll get very high resolution and 60 frame/sec footage anyway.

Also here's a digitizer project that might help with the analog out of the
pinhole cams.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~ucapwas/video.html


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2001\03\07@184239 by Steve Bergerson

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As I said earlier this is pretty easy.  There are a bunch of folks at the
Seattle Robotics society doing this.  You use a fast AD converter and store
the data in memory.  See this site for a Game Boy Camera example.

members.home.net/daniel.herrington/gbcam.html
One with a Pic
http://minyos.its.rmit.edu.au/~s9906768/pic/proj_gbc.html




The Seattle site is:

http://www.seattlerobotics.org/

Some of the folks use the M68332 chip to process the data in real time and
have robotic vision systems up and running.  A critter cam could be made for
under $200.  All you need is a MRM board and a Gameboy cam and it will store
digital pictures all day long or until the batteries die.

MRM boards are available from:

http://www.robominds.com/robomind.htm





From Steve
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{Original Message removed}

2001\03\07@184909 by mike

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On Wed, 7 Mar 2001 09:15:20 -0800, you wrote:

>http://www.piclist.com/postbot.asp?id=piclist\2001\03\06\183702a
>
>My understanding (perhaps incorrect) is that CCD and other small cheap
>cameras produce compositve video output and that converting from analog
>video formats to digital formats is difficult.  The cheapest solution I've
>found is to use a WinTV card, but that would require PCI bus mastering,
>etc.  Is there an easy way to convert the output of a cheap camera to
>some digital form (perhaps for later postprocessing)?  I like the idea of
>a crittercam.
>
>Ellen

Many CMOS camera chips are available with digital outputs, e.g. from
SGS-Thomson (formerly VLSI Vision). Many cheap webcams use these, with
a seperate controller chip. Output data is probably too fast to handle on a PIC, but there is
often scope to slow the clock down to a certain extent. The output is usually a multiplexed RGB stream, and some
post-processing is needed to reconstruct the original colour images.
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