Searching \ for ' [PIC] Questions from a newbie in need.' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/begin.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'Questions from a newbie in need.'.

No exact or substring matches. trying for part
PICList Thread
'[PICLIST] [PIC] Questions from a newbie in need.'
2001\01\18@153754 by Michael R. Lauter

picon face
       Hey all, I'm a 17 year old high school student, and have been doing
computer programming for a few years now.  I would say I'm an advanced c/c++
programmer, but haven't bit the bullet and learned ASM yet.  Anyhow, I'm
really interested in electronics, but know nothing about it.  I came up with
a really cool idea for a project for my car (I drive a 2001 VW GTI 1.8T that
i paid for with money i made making websites ;P), and I have a LOT of
questions. Where can i start learning about PICs?  I need a beginnners
tutorial from somewhere.. everywhere i look i just get ads for hardware and
stuff.  Basically, what i wanted to do for my car was create an dashboard
mounted LCD screen, with a few buttons on it that do different things, such
as showing how much boost the turbo is pushing, exhaust temperatures, etc..
i'd like to make a full color display, but i don't know if this/any of this
is possible.  Anyhow, this is just one idea I had, but please someone reply
with some info to get me going, possibly a good book to read on the subject,
please, anything!

"Those who rely on hope will die fasting" - Thomas Hobbes

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\18@160741 by Andrew E. Kalman

flavicon
face
Hi Michael.

Re:

>Anyhow, this is just one idea I had, but please someone reply
>with some info to get me going, possibly a good book to read on the subject,
>please, anything!

Since I'm a car nut, let me steer you to our web site,
http://www.pumpkininc.com. In the User Manual for our RTOS (which
runs on PICs, by the way) there are a couple of threads about dashes
and displays like you're talking about. An RTOS makes implementing
that sort of thing very easy, and you can focus on other parts of the
design.

Just a word to the wise -- learning about microcontrollers is a
multi-tiered thing, when coming from the world of PCs and C. You may
want to consider starting about by staying in C, and learning about
the hardware subsystems (A/D, I/O, timers, etc.) of the chips. Once
you've mastered that, then jump into assembly. But you may find that
it's really not all that necessary to learn assembly ...

Don't get me wrong, I've written assembly for 15+ years, and I think
it's an essential part of a programmer's toolkit. But C will get you
95% of the way there, even with PICs (some will disagree).

We have special deals for students, etc ...

--

 ______________________________________
  Andrew E. Kalman, Ph.D.   spam_OUTaekTakeThisOuTspampumpkininc.com

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\18@184520 by CrowKiller

flavicon
face
"Michael R. Lauter" wrote :

> Basically, what i wanted to do for my car was create an dashboard
> mounted LCD screen, with a few buttons on it that do different things, such
> as showing how much boost the turbo is pushing, exhaust temperatures, etc..
> i'd like to make a full color display, but i don't know if this/any of this
> is possible.  Anyhow, this is just one idea I had, but please someone reply
> with some info to get me going, possibly a good book to read on the subject,
> please, anything!

There's something that pop instantly in my mind: ZWorld's Product line.
They're in the business of industrial automation, and I've got very good
feedback
from friends about their support department. (and a very good line of articles
in
Circuit Cellar about the Jackrabbit by the way)

I advise you to take a look around their site, and check differents products.
I know it's a little pricey, but if you want to get your project done quick and
early without a kind-of-vertical learning curve and debugging problems I would
use these. And they got a very good Dynamic C Dev Suite.

I'm 15 years old, and I got some experience doing electronic projects. I can
assure
you  that if you start with any "premade" module, like a SIMMStick or even Basic

Stamps, you will get far better results (quick prototyping and implementation)
that
learning all the hard way. After getting used to the basics, you can move up to
more
complex circuit design and home-made PCB etching.

There's more different architectures, chip manufacturers and possibilities out
there
that you can imagine. ItSs only a matter of personnal choice.
(and avaiability, Auhhum*ATMEL*cought ;o)

Keep hangin on those mailing lists, try to read good websites and you will be
able
to make everything you want, from a lame rain data-aquisition device to a
wireless
digital spycams network! !! ;o) all you  need is time, know-how, and money (you
don't seem to lack the last one as I am though =0)

PS. I don't know any PIC-based "module", if someone could tell a bit more, I
think it
would be less off topic :o)

Here's some quick links:
http://www2.arnes.si/~uljfer3/elect/doc/primer.htm --
The microcontroller FAQ, good read for newbies

http://www.zworld.com            -- Zworld's world ;o)
http://www.parallaxinc.com      -- Home of the Basic Stamp
http://www.linuxdevices.com    -- Linux-oriented electronic devices

Happy Hardware Hacking,
CrowKiller

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\18@191055 by Douglas Wood

picon face
Michael,

I've done a fair bit of electronics that went inside automobiles.

You need to take care to use an LCD display that operates in low & high
temperatures (remember, the inside of a car gets really cold in the winter
and really, really hot in the summer). most LCDs won't display anything in
very cold conditions, and the entire display turns black in very hot
conditions. Even most LCD display rated for high-temperature still have
problems in the summer.

Douglas Wood
Software Engineer
.....dbwoodKILLspamspam@spam@kc.rr.com

Home of EIS (Enhanced Instruction Set) for the PIC

{Original Message removed}

2001\01\18@195037 by Tony Nixon

flavicon
picon face
Douglas Wood wrote:
>
> Michael,
>
> I've done a fair bit of electronics that went inside automobiles.
>
> You need to take care to use an LCD display that operates in low & high
> temperatures (remember, the inside of a car gets really cold in the winter
> and really, really hot in the summer). most LCDs won't display anything in
> very cold conditions, and the entire display turns black in very hot
> conditions. Even most LCD display rated for high-temperature still have
> problems in the summer.

Use a temp sensor to adjust the VCC inverse to temperature.

--
Best regards

Tony

mICro's
http://www.picnpoke.com
salesspamKILLspampicnpoke.com

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The list server can filter out subtopics
(like ads or off topics) for you. See http://www.piclist.com/#topics


2001\01\18@205421 by Douglas Wood

picon face
That trick will only go so far. Once the temperature inside the car has
turned the entire display's liquid crystals black, the only way to see
anything on the display again is to cool down the display.

Douglas Wood
Software Engineer

Home of EIS (Enhanced Instruction Set) for the PIC
{Original Message removed}

2001\01\19@105241 by Sergio Picado

flavicon
face
       See about purchasing the programmer/development tool from Parallax.  Part
#PICPGM-ND in Digi-Key.  It's a good, fast way to get started.  Buy a few of
the PIC 16C5X series ucontrollers (EPROM configuration), also from Digi-Key,
to ge started with the basics.  Then graduate to the 6X's, 7X's and newer
ones.  My personal favorite is the PIC 66.

       As you get more familiar with them make your life easier by purchasing the
ClearView Mathias emulator from TechTools and familiarize yourself with the
TechTools assembler instruction set.

Personal opinion I >>> on such small ucontroller like PIC's stay away from
C, stick to assembly.  Assembly is not hard and is very compact and
powerful.

Personal opinion II >>>> also stick with Digi-Key (see about opening an
account).  Few vendors are as reliable, friendly and as easy to work with.
I also highly rate TechTools for their good products and very easy and quick
phone help


       Cheers

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\19@105455 by Wynn Rostek

flavicon
face
> Just a word to the wise -- learning about microcontrollers is a
> multi-tiered thing, when coming from the world of PCs and C. You may
> want to consider starting about by staying in C, and learning about
> the hardware subsystems (A/D, I/O, timers, etc.) of the chips. Once
> you've mastered that, then jump into assembly. But you may find that
> it's really not all that necessary to learn assembly ...
>
> Don't get me wrong, I've written assembly for 15+ years, and I think
> it's an essential part of a programmer's toolkit. But C will get you
> 95% of the way there, even with PICs (some will disagree).

I've written in assembly language for 30 years now. I still write in
assembly language for some projects, but most of my embedded programming is
in C these days.

My current project uses a PIC16F877 and I used the Hi-Tech C compiler.
Easiest time I ever had with an embedded system. There isn't the first line
of assembly language in it, and yes it uses interrupts.

This is a commercial product and the first production run of 500 ships to a
single customer in less than 2 weeks. (International no less!)

I like assembly language, but it is not as required as it once was.
Understanding the chip and the subsystems is the tricky part if you really
are a C expert, but then it took about 10 years and 3 million lines of code
for me to become a real C expert. It is not always easy to outwit the
optimizer.

Wynn Rostek

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\19@133609 by Dan Michaels

flavicon
face
Wynn Rostek wrote:

>I like assembly language, but it is not as required as it once was.
>Understanding the chip and the subsystems is the tricky part if you really
>are a C expert, but then it took about 10 years and 3 million lines of code
>for me to become a real C expert. It is not always easy to outwit the
>optimizer.
>

3,000,000 lines/10years = 300,000 lines/year
300,000 lines/200days = 1500 lines/day

Whew, impressive. How the heck do you code so
fast? [need a job?]

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\19@135055 by Dipperstein, Michael

face picon face
I don't know about Wynn, but cut and paste is a way of life for me.  Write 50
lines of code.  Cut and paste 10, now you've written 60. :)

-Mike

> {Original Message removed}

2001\01\19@140843 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>
>3,000,000 lines/10years = 300,000 lines/year
>300,000 lines/200days = 1500 lines/day
>
>Whew, impressive. How the heck do you code so
>fast? [need a job?]


Look ma, no bugs!

nop
nop
nop
nop
...

;-)


--
Where's dave? http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/find.cgi?kc6ete-9

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\19@161847 by Wynn Rostek

flavicon
face
> I don't know about Wynn, but cut and paste is a way of life for me.  Write
50
> lines of code.  Cut and paste 10, now you've written 60. :)
>
> -Mike

Write a 100 lines, cut and paste 25, edit 22, cut and paste 15, edit 13, fix
9 bugs.
My secret is out.

(70 percent of my bugs come from cut and paste errors. You gain a little
here, you lose a little there.)

> > Whew, impressive. How the heck do you code so
> > fast? [need a job?]

Runs in the family, my mother had to use modified IBM Selectric typewriters,
she typed about 110 WPM. She worked as a keypunch operator for many years.
I'm a member of Mensa, I have a natural talent for software, I've been doing
it for a long time, and I have a medical condition.

Wynn

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\19@163543 by Dan Michaels

flavicon
face
Wynn wrote:
>> I don't know about Wynn, but cut and paste is a way of life for me.  Write
>50
>> lines of code.  Cut and paste 10, now you've written 60. :)
>>
>> -Mike
>
>Write a 100 lines, cut and paste 25, edit 22, cut and paste 15, edit 13, fix
>9 bugs.
>My secret is out.
>


Yeah, but who wrote the code in the 1st place?
[we got a job for "him" :) (or her)].

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\19@180816 by Wynn Rostek

flavicon
face
> Yeah, but who wrote the code in the 1st place?
> [we got a job for "him" :) (or her)].

Dan,

For the most part, I wrote the code in the first place. That way you avoid
problems with infringment, licensing, etc. I have been known to use huge
blocks of others code when it is clear that we have full permission to do
so. The error correcting code we used on a shuttle experiment was all mine,
mainly due to CPU cycle constraints. The library code that did all of the
required initialization and clean up on exit for the communication system at
KSC I did because I knew more about OOP than anybody else on the programming
team, and we were programming in straight C so constructors and destructors
were not a given. (Actually all the library for the entire project, 12
people, 5 years) The code for using rough sets to do data mining on weather
data for fine scale feature prediction I stole from the researchers in
Poland who were experts in the field of rough sets.

The 3 million lines of code was counting all the code I've written over the
last 27 years, most in C, but a lot in assembly language. I learned an awful
lot about programming by writing assembly language, but it's a very painful
way to learn. The 10 years is the number of years it took me to become an
expert in C. Not all of those 27 years were spent in serious programming. I
spent many years as an electronics technician, some time as a chief engineer
at a radio station, some time designing anti-submarine warfare equipment, a
lot of years at Kennedy Space Center, a writer for Computer Shopper, had my
own software company for a few years, and now I'm designing analog
circuitry, digital circutry, coding embedded systems in C, laying out PC
boards and writing Unix and Windows applications in C++.

One thing is constant during that 27 years. I've written at least as much
code at home as I have at work. I've written my own assemblers, compilers,
my own operating systems. I've designed, programmed and built controllers
for the local ham radio repeater, controllers for the fox transmitters,
microcontroller based direction finders, alarm systems for the car and for
the house (to keep the dog out of the garbage) I've written several CAD
programs so that I could do my own PC boards at home. My first two personal
computers were S-100 systems. Together they cost one third what I paid for
my house the prior year. I was a very serious hobbyist. If you do a little
reading on software engineering you'll find that most experts agree that a
10 to 1 or 20 to 1 ratio between your best people and your worst people is
expected. Some people are just better at software than others. I ain't
perfect, but on a good day I can turn out a frightning amount of code.

Wynn

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: The PICList is archived three different
ways.  See http://www.piclist.com/#archives for details.


2001\01\25@021126 by James Burkart

flavicon
face
Why not buy a laptop and write a program in C++ to accomplish this. Then
mount the thing in your dash?

Just a thought... =o)

{Original Message removed}

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2001 , 2002 only
- Today
- New search...