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'[PICLIST] [PIC] Any ideas on a car security system'
2001\01\24@190122 by Sean Rollins (VE7SNR)

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       Hi guys. I've been watching the list for quite some time now, but haven't
had too much input. I'm working on a car security system project for my car
(because it was broken into yesturday and I'm pissed off). Does anyone have
any ideas in mind? I'd like to use a 16F84, because I have them. I just
need to know how I might go about it. I think I can use the door sensors
that are already in the car (do they work on ground completion?), and I was
thinking something along the lines of a rf keyfob for enable/disable. Then
of course the blinking led etc. etc.. So, lets hear it, and ideas?

Thanks,

Sean Rollins, VE7SNR
Mountain View Computers
Vancouver Island, B.C.

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2001\01\24@195215 by Ken Robertson

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If you car was broken into and you want to protect it, your best bet would
be to buy an security system, since they already tie into everything, and
come with warranties for the parts, as well as if your car is broken into.

If you do want to make it yourself, go for simplicity so this doesn't turn
into a big project when it doesn't need to be.  For stuff like the doors,
tie it into the dome light or the door ajar light on your dash.  Hook up a
relay to draw less current too.  For the trunk, use the light in the trunk.
Then get a shock/vibration sensor with adjustable sensativity, whatever else
you need.  It sounds completely toable though.

One final thing you should add, a battery power supply.  That way if someone
pops your hood and cuts the power, it can detect it and still set off the
siren.  Self-powered sirens are good too.  Cut the power to mine once when
it was going off and it was blaring for 30+ minutes.

Ken

{Original Message removed}

2001\01\24@230135 by Ray Russell

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In a message dated 1/24/01 7:04:10 PM Eastern Standard Time, spam_OUTve7snrTakeThisOuTspamHOME.COM
writes:


{Quote hidden}

Sean,
Door switches do work by grounding. So this can be used to trip your alarm!8>)
Unless the perp uses a rock to bust your window!8>(
Need to add a sonic detector also.
Ray Russell
General Contractor
Norfolk & Western Railroad

Pocahontas Division
Circa 1958
Visit The Pocahontas Website at:
<A HREF="http://milliron.home.sprynet.com/Pocahontas/Pocahontas1.htm">Click here: Pocahontas Home</A>
OR
http://milliron.home.sprynet.com/Pocahontas/Pocahontas1.htm

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2001\01\25@012433 by Philip Martin

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I recall reading an article some years ago about a French chap who had
become fed up with his car being broken into. His answer was to have a
secret switch that you had to press before sitting in the drivers seat. If
you failed to press the switch, a pressure sensitive switch enabled the
release of the anti theft device. This was a cunning and curios devices, not
so much a deterrent as a final solution, a 12" bayonet would plunge up
through the seat!!

Now at least with the advances in technology we can (using a PIC of course)
devise a delay system with some verbal warning and perhaps an LCD display
message?

Alas the French man was locked up and the thief, well it was his last break
in!

Philip Martin.


{Original Message removed}

2001\01\25@090546 by t F. Touchton

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part 1 3041 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset=us-asciiThis may actually be [OT] instead of PIC, but here goes....

My truck was continually getting "keyed" when it was new... I put in a system
with a microwave motion sensor.  It was based on a C57, and also had inputs from
a photocell.... seems as if I also sometimes forgot to roll the windows up and
lock it at night.

So, the 57 could monitor the motion sensor, could trigger an alarm and paging
system, could lock the doors and roll up the windows.

If you walked up to the truck, it chirped the alarm, locked the doors and rolled
up the windows.  If someone continually moved around near the vehicle, it paged
me.  If you opened the doors the alarm sounded (and of course it paged again).

Here's the added benefit.. if you forgot to roll you windows up and a sudden
downpour occured... the rain tripped the microwave sensor and rolled the windows
up for you...

I was always concerned about a kid getting stuck in the window while it rolled
up... however since it was up pretty high, a kid would need a ladder to get
there head in the window.  The window motors would stall easily.. so I just
timed them (ran for 5 seconds then stopped).


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|        |          <ve7snr@HOME.|
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 |       Subject:     [PIC] Any ideas on a car security system?               |
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       Hi guys. I've been watching the list for quite some time now, but
haven't
had too much input. I'm working on a car security system project for my car
(because it was broken into yesturday and I'm pissed off). Does anyone have
any ideas in mind? I'd like to use a 16F84, because I have them. I just
need to know how I might go about it. I think I can use the door sensors
that are already in the car (do they work on ground completion?), and I was
thinking something along the lines of a rf keyfob for enable/disable. Then
of course the blinking led etc. etc.. So, lets hear it, and ideas?

Thanks,

Sean Rollins, VE7SNR
Mountain View Computers
Vancouver Island, B.C.

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part 2 2759 bytes content-type:application/octet-stream; (decode)

part 3 136 bytes
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2001\01\25@100008 by Lawrence Lile

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I used to have a very simple security system in my car.  One time the key
gotr stuck in the ignition, and when I got done messing around with it, the
ignition was destroyed.  Toyota wanted $50 for a new one, so I hacked
together my own start switch, and hid it under the seat.  Now how they gonna
steal my car if they can't find the ignition?

Also, keep an old beater car.  They don't steal old beaters.

-- Lawrence Lile


----- Original Message -----
From: "Philip Martin" <.....philip.martin1KILLspamspam.....BTINTERNET.COM>
To: <EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 6:26 PM
Subject: Re: [PIC] Any ideas on a car security system?


> I recall reading an article some years ago about a French chap who had
> become fed up with his car being broken into. His answer was to have a
> secret switch that you had to press before sitting in the drivers seat. If
> you failed to press the switch, a pressure sensitive switch enabled the
> release of the anti theft device. This was a cunning and curios devices,
not
> so much a deterrent as a final solution, a 12" bayonet would plunge up
> through the seat!!
>
> Now at least with the advances in technology we can (using a PIC of
course)
> devise a delay system with some verbal warning and perhaps an LCD display
> message?
>
> Alas the French man was locked up and the thief, well it was his last
break
> in!
>
> Philip Martin.
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2001\01\25@121448 by goflo

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Simple setup I rigged for interested customers was an electric
fuel pump, with a hidden switch in the fuel pump circuit. The
stock mechanical pump was left in place, but disabled by re-
moving the diaphragm and pushrod. The electric pump was mounted
unobstrusively under the vehicle. Under-hood looked bone stock.
A carburetted car will get a few hundred yards before quitting,
leaving the aspiring motorist to either troubleshoot a disabled
stolen car in the middle of the pike, or beat feet.

Easier to do with EFI - With a PIC, of course - A pgmable delay
which kills the fuel pump N seconds after startup if the hidden
switch is not engaged. As with any automotive app, thought needs
to be given to the harsh physical and electrical environment.

regards, Jack

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2001\01\25@130722 by Alan B. Pearce

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>Simple setup I rigged for interested customers was an electric
>fuel pump, with a hidden switch in the fuel pump circuit. The

Or even an electric valve which is normally off, and keep using the original
pump.

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2001\01\25@132413 by M. Adam Davis

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If you do this, make sure you do it after the pressure bleeder, not right
before or after the pump - we wouldn't want the potential thief to damage
our fuel pump, would we?

this makes me wonder, though - what if you put a normally open valve in
parallel with the bleeder.  When open, the engine wouldn't be getting the
fuel pressure it needs, so it would probably just not work (the fuel pump
is simply pumping the fuel from the tank back into the tank), but I wonder
if it would damage the engine in any way...  My instincts say it probably
wouldn't, since it would be much like trying to turn the engine over on an
empty tank of fuel - but my instincts haven't spent much time around efi
cars, so I know not to trust them very much.  I've heard that letting an
efi car run out of gas while it's running is damaging, though.

Does anyone have any sound hypothesis (or better yet - real world
knowledge) about what happens when the fuel line to the injectors is
depressurized, as far as damage to the car?  (obviously it won't run well,
if it runs at all)

Actually, nearly all cars have an emergency fuel pump cut off switch
inside the car (mine is under the steering wheel area).  It should be a
simple measure to put a switch (or pic and switching system) there in
series with this switch.  This may actually be a better bet than putting
in an extra fuel pump and such...

-Adam

"Alan B. Pearce" wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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2001\01\25@144732 by goflo

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M. Adam Davis wrote:
>  I've heard that letting an
> efi car run out of gas while it's running is damaging, though.

Two things I'm aware of: The pump is cooled by fuel, running it dry
is not a good idea - EFI pumps are expensive. The other thing is that
running the system dry can necessitate bleeding the fuel lines and
rails to get the air out - Not just a matter of adding fuel.

> Actually, nearly all cars have an emergency fuel pump cut off switch
> inside the car (mine is under the steering wheel area).  It should be a
> simple measure to put a switch (or pic and switching system) there in
> series with this switch.

Right. That's what I meant.

Jack

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2001\01\26@014535 by Tsvetan Usunov

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This topic is very interesting and everything depend on what your goals
are.

Here in Eastern Europe we have a lot of criminality and car theft, here the
goals are not if your car will get broken, but if you will find your car
where you left it at all ;)

So I think the real car security experts are here in Easter Europe, Italy
(where have lot of criminality too) and Israel which is probably most
demanding security market in the world.

So the alarm systems are almost useless as our criminals by pass them very
quickly. We can talk in hours but believe me I have seen most alarms
by-passes in 30 seconds or less. Adding the relatively high level of false
alarms ratio almost nobody take care when hear some car is chirping for
several seconds (you can hear false alarms almost everywhere).
Anyway alarm with very restricted inputs as door, hood and trunk buttons is
OK as it will signal only when is entered in the car.
Don't put vibration not microwave sensors until you want to piss off your
neighbors.

The immobilizer is which have to take care the car to stay where you left
it. Usually it contains several relays which broke vital circuits in car as
fuel pump, ignition, starter, computer etc.
Here the problem is that once in your car the high tech theft easily locate
the main module and by pass the relays and ....

We have spent several years in developing the most reliable car immobilizer
on the market for one of our Israeli customer.
Check for it at http://www.olimex.com/immobe.html
It contains one main module and many hidden remote relays which communicate
through existing car wiring i.e. there are no wires between the main
control module and the circuit breaking relays. So here is nothing which
the theft can trace and by pass! If he broke the main module he will never
run the car as the relays require ON command to close their contacts.

Best regards

Tsvetan
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