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'[PICLIST] [OT] UV light for photo-positive PCB'
2001\03\27@141402 by John Waters

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Hi All,

When using photo-positive PCB, I need a UV light source to expose the board.
Where can I buy this UV light? I saw in Home Depot a kind florecent tubes
like those we use at home but violet in color (I suppose they give UV
light). Can I use them?

Thanks in advance!

John



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2001\03\27@154759 by Simon Ethier

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violet doesn't mean UV ....  UV tube are normlly transparent (no color)...


----- Original Message -----
From: "John Waters" <.....john_fm_watersKILLspamspam@spam@HOTMAIL.COM>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2001 2:14 PM
Subject: [OT] UV light for photo-positive PCB


> Hi All,
>
> When using photo-positive PCB, I need a UV light source to expose the
board.
{Quote hidden}

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2001\03\27@161219 by Wojciech Zabolotny

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On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 03:45:38PM -0500, Simon Ethier wrote:
> violet doesn't mean UV ....  UV tube are normlly transparent (no color)...
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2001\03\27@164205 by Michael W. Bogucki

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Hi John,
       I am assuming these tube are around 18 inches in length....If
so...yes you can use them for PCB uv fabrication. I've built a
double-sided light box using those tubes...Suprisingly they work really
well...not to mention that they are far cheaper than purchasing the UV
tubes meant for pcb fabrication.

--|\/| | |< E

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new
discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..."
               -- Isaac Asimov

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Simon Ethier wrote:

> violet doesn't mean UV ....  UV tube are normlly transparent (no color)...
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2001\03\27@170326 by Art Hanson

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Call me crazy but I've been using a 100W incadescent bulb (GE,
clear) in a desk lamp.  I expose the photo-positive PCBs between
glass plates with the lamp 8 inches away for exactly 8 minutes on
each side.  I've been doing it for over a year and it's worked every
time. If your board is larger than your lamp, you'll want to rotate it
180 degrees halfway through to ensure an even exposure.

Art



On 27 Mar 2001, at 14:14, John Waters wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Art Hanson

embios
158 S. Prospect St.
Hagerstown, MD 21740

Phone: (301)992-3557
email: @spam@hansonKILLspamspamembios.com

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2001\03\27@173131 by Claude Gagner

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Wath you saw are black lights... they do emit UV but not quite the proper
wavelength for pcb's. I have use those in the pass only to find out that the
exposure time is much longer than when I use the recommended type. My
suggestion is: by the right type, sold at some electronics stores.

-----Message d'origine-----
De : pic microcontroller discussion list
[RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]De la part de Simon Ethier
Envoyé : 27 mars, 2001 15:46
À : spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Objet : Re: [OT] UV light for photo-positive PCB


violet doesn't mean UV ....  UV tube are normlly transparent (no color)...


{Original Message removed}

2001\03\27@180748 by Tony Goetz

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The following is an article done on photo-etching. It was written for us
model-builders to make our own detail parts, but still applies to PCBs, of
course. He says all the materials he used, the processes (in simple
English!), and even the serial number for the lamp needed.


<A HREF="home.att.net/~ward.shrake/modeling/fotoetch.htm">
http://home.att.net/~ward.shrake/modeling/fotoetch.htm</A>



-Tony

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2001\03\27@185414 by Michael W. Bogucki

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Hi All,
       I've been using these tubes for about a year now. I've got four
on the bottom and 4 on top, inside my lightbox. The tubes are about 3-4
inches away from the PCB's. The exposure time is less
than 2 minutes.  One thing that I discovered is that when I was first
making prototypes, I would print the circuit pattern on clear plastic
(used for overhead projectors...). This worked, but just on chance, I
tried using regular copier paper with the trace printed on it.
Surprisingly this worked really well and it was much cheaper than
the plastic material! (Acetate??)

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discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..."
               -- Isaac Asimov

On Tue, 27 Mar 2001, Claude Gagner wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2001\03\28@110733 by Roman Black

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Wojciech Zabolotny wrote:

> > > When using photo-positive PCB, I need a UV light source to expose the
> > board.
> > > Where can I buy this UV light? I saw in Home Depot a kind florecent tubes
> > > like those we use at home but violet in color (I suppose they give UV
> > > light). Can I use them?
> > >
>
> Because the professional UV sources are rather expensive, I usually use just
> the radient element from the mercury-discharge lamp, obtained after carefull
> breaking the lamp's bulb.
> Well, I don't know if it's really safe - it produces a lot of ozone.
> Additionally one must remember about the choking coil. Once I had no the
> proper one, so I used the 100W incadescent lamp instead - the result was a
> quite good RF noise generator ;-). The radio reception was quite impossible
> in my room.


Hi Wojciech, I would like to hear more about this.
So this was a mercury discharge HID lamp, that has
the tiny clear tube inside the big globe? Don't
they get really hot? How many watts was the lamp?
This sounds pretty clever if you can get it safe and
reliable.
:o)
-Roman

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2001\03\28@173407 by Wojciech Zabolotny

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On Wed, Mar 28, 2001 at 06:59:59PM +1000, Roman Black wrote:
> Wojciech Zabolotny wrote:
>
> > Because the professional UV sources are rather expensive, I usually use just
> > the radient element from the mercury-discharge lamp, obtained after carefull
> > breaking the lamp's bulb.
> > Well, I don't know if it's really safe - it produces a lot of ozone.
> > Additionally one must remember about the choking coil. Once I had no the
> > proper one, so I used the 100W incadescent lamp instead - the result was a
> > quite good RF noise generator ;-). The radio reception was quite impossible
> > in my room.
>
>
> Hi Wojciech, I would like to hear more about this.
> So this was a mercury discharge HID lamp, that has
> the tiny clear tube inside the big globe?

Yes it, is that kind of lamp. I use the LRF-125 lamp produced in Poland.

> Don't they get really hot? How many watts was the lamp?

125 watts.
However I remember, that the first trials were performed with the choking
coil taken from the 40W fluorescent lamp, so the power was reduced.
When it works with the appropriate choking coil, the lamp gets really hot,
but it does not harm the lighted elements (just keep the 20 cm distance from
the lamp).
I used it successfully as EPROM eraser and for PCB's. The exposition times
were ca. 10 minutes.


> This sounds pretty clever if you can get it safe and
> reliable.

I don't know if it is really safe. Probably the UV produced by such lamp may
contain dangerous short-wave components, which in not broken lamp are
eliminated by the outer bulb... The intensive smell of ozone suggest it may
be true. I just prefer to leave the room, when the lamp is on.

--
                       Wojciech Zabolotny
                       EraseMEwzabspamise.pw.edu.pl

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2001\03\29@103928 by mike

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On Tue, 27 Mar 2001 14:14:02 -0500, you wrote:

>Hi All,
>
>When using photo-positive PCB, I need a UV light source to expose the board.
>Where can I buy this UV light? I saw in Home Depot a kind florecent tubes
>like those we use at home but violet in color (I suppose they give UV
>light). Can I use them?
The correct tubes are the ones designed for insect killers. Available
from any good electrical store. DO NOT use the germicidal type, which
have clear glass as opposed to the white appearence of the
insect-killer tubes.

More info on PCB making http://www.netcomuk.co.uk/~wwl/pcbs.html

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2001\03\29@103938 by mike

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On Tue, 27 Mar 2001 23:12:53 +0200, you wrote:

>On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 03:45:38PM -0500, Simon Ethier wrote:
>> violet doesn't mean UV ....  UV tube are normlly transparent (no color)...
>>
>>
>> {Original Message removed}

2001\03\31@113435 by mervin

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I'm new at this electronics hobby, but...
I used the purple iron-on type of transfer film for my NOPPP and "84 on a
board" PCB with the Radio Shack etch solution.
I was surprised at how well the board turned out (small print lettering was
very clear) and I did both as a two sided board.
No lights required, just the household iron.  Did discover it's a must to
use a straight thru feed laser printer (or copier) not one like the HP4 that
moves the paper all around rollers on the inside. Jamming cause the waste of
several (expensive) 1/2 sheets of film.
Malcolm
{Original Message removed}

2001\03\31@132418 by Robin Birch

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Er, guys,
Just a tip.  Discharge lights like this work really well but chuck out a
lot of the wrong (harmful) sort of UV.  Either rig it all up in a box or
set it up on a timer and get out of the room.

IIRC UV tubes are not that expensive so it shouldn't be too difficult to
buy some and make a box.

regards

Robin
In message <00f501c0ba0f$fc33c1a0$RemoveMEc9715f18EraseMEspamEraseMEmidsouth.rr.com>, mervin
<RemoveMEmervinspam_OUTspamKILLspamMIDSOUTH.RR.COM> writes
>I'm new at this electronics hobby, but...
>I used the purple iron-on type of transfer film for my NOPPP and "84 on a
>board" PCB with the Radio Shack etch solution.
>I was surprised at how well the board turned out (small print lettering was
>very clear) and I did both as a two sided board.
>No lights required, just the household iron.  Did discover it's a must to
>use a straight thru feed laser printer (or copier) not one like the HP4 that
>moves the paper all around rollers on the inside. Jamming cause the waste of
>several (expensive) 1/2 sheets of film.
>Malcolm
>{Original Message removed}

2001\03\31@140043 by Chris Carr

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> Er, guys,
> Just a tip.  Discharge lights like this work really well but chuck out a
> lot of the wrong (harmful) sort of UV.  Either rig it all up in a box or
> set it up on a timer and get out of the room.
>
> IIRC UV tubes are not that expensive so it shouldn't be too difficult to
> buy some and make a box.
>
A cheaper source of suitable UV is that big yellow ball in a clear summer
sky.

Granted there are one or two disadvantages but it's free and it does work,
even in Yorkshire, although I have a feeling that there will be too much
smoke in the atmosphere this year due to the large barbecues we are having
:-)



Regards

Chris

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2001\03\31@140453 by Timothy Stranex

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I do my boards using an HP4 and they have so far worked out fine!

Timothy Stranex
EraseMEtimotspamspamspamBeGoneuskonet.com
South Africa

On Sat, 31 Mar 2001, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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'[PICLIST] [OT] UV light for photo-positive PCB'
2001\04\01@035218 by Alan B. Pearce
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>Granted there are one or two disadvantages but it's free and it does work,
>even in Yorkshire, although I have a feeling that there will be too much
>smoke in the atmosphere this year due to the large barbecues we are having
>:-)

Do be careful though, as I have destroyed an EPROM that had a domed quartz
window on it and was left in the sun. The dome on the window seemed to focus the
sun enough to destroy the chip inside.

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2001\04\01@155849 by Peter L. Peres

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>A cheaper source of suitable UV is that big yellow ball in a clear summer
>sky.

Chat up your local barber and place the exposure frame in his germicidal
box for 5-8 minutes ;-).

Peter

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2001\04\01@163713 by Chris Carr

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> >A cheaper source of suitable UV is that big yellow ball in a clear summer
> >sky.
>
> Chat up your local barber and place the exposure frame in his germicidal
> box for 5-8 minutes ;-).
>
I always wondered what I should reply (in the 60's) when a Barber asked me
"Do you want anything for the weekend ?". Now I know, "Yes mate, stick this
PCB in your germicidal box for 5 minutes",  the trouble is they don't ask
you that question these days.    :-)

Chris

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2001\04\02@230147 by Javier

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Hi
I just use a normal fluorescent tube, more exposure time needed though.
Bye
Javier

----- Original Message -----
From: Mike Harrison <EraseMEmikespamEraseMEWHITEWING.CO.UK>
To: <@spam@PICLIST@spam@spamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2001 12:41 PM
Subject: Re: [OT] UV light for photo-positive PCB


On Tue, 27 Mar 2001 23:12:53 +0200, you wrote:

>On Tue, Mar 27, 2001 at 03:45:38PM -0500, Simon Ethier wrote:
>> violet doesn't mean UV ....  UV tube are normlly transparent (no
color)...
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "John Waters" <spamBeGonejohn_fm_watersspamKILLspamHOTMAIL.COM>
>>
>> > Hi All,
>> >
>> > When using photo-positive PCB, I need a UV light source to expose the
>> board.
>> > Where can I buy this UV light? I saw in Home Depot a kind florecent
tubes
>> > like those we use at home but violet in color (I suppose they give UV
>> > light). Can I use them?
>> >
>
>Because the professional UV sources are rather expensive, I usually use
just
>the radient element from the mercury-discharge lamp, obtained after
carefull
>breaking the lamp's bulb.
>Well, I don't know if it's really safe - it produces a lot of ozone.
Which means you have hard UV, which can cause skin and eye damage -
Don't do it. saving a few $ for the right tube isn.';t worth the risk.

.

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