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'[PICLIST] [OT] Internal Antenna baloney!'
2001\08\27@121641 by Matthew Fries

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Alright, I have been seeing so many commercials about this thing and have
wondered how it could possibly work.

In case you have not heard of it, the "internal antenna" looks to be a
thin piece of gold foil with adhesive backing that you place underneath
the battery of your cell phone. It claims to boost the signal reception of
your cell phone.

My question is... How?

The phone that is used in the ad is a Nokia of some sort. Lucky me, I have
a nokia, so I could use it as comparison. I don't even know how this would
work, because it does not appear that the foil is electrically
connected with *ANY* contacts on the phone at all.

Secondly, the foil does not appear to contain any active components, or
any recognizable components at all. It's just foil.

Thirdly, the foil does not even seem to be any complete circuit. It
appears to be a collection of traces arranged in a U or C shape. Maybe
this acts as some sort of RF coil or filter? If so, how could it possibly
have an effect since it is neither grounded or connected to the phone?

Is this in fact just a bunch of hooey, or does it have any credability as
a valid device?

What do you think?

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2001\08\27@122902 by M. Adam Davis

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You would probably have to delve into antenna theory toget the full
story, but about all I can offer is that many antennas (especially TV
roof antennas) have passive elements which are also not connected to the
antenna wires, or grounded.  These elements do serve a purpose, however...

Whether the internal antenna helps or not is probably subjective.  A few
scenarios could happen, though.  I imagine it couples with internal
circuitry, and possible wouldn't pass normal emissions tests, or at
least would have higher levels of emissions.  Since the strongest
emission is the readio signal then it would gain a small bit from pieces
of metal neraby, especially those in which it could resonate (the right
size/shape, etc).  But then you are increasing the emitted signal from
the phone which could then exceed FCC (or the equivilant in your coutry)
limitations for hand held cell phones.

Of course, it could be snake oil.  Anyone else see the "X-ION" in
stores?  Heh...

-Adam

Matthew Fries wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2001\08\27@123522 by Jim

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It *is* baloney.

Unless you view it as a money-making scheme
in which case it makes *perfect* sense ...

Jim

{Original Message removed}

2001\08\27@124346 by Dan Michaels

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Matthew Fries wrote:

>
>In case you have not heard of it, the "internal antenna" looks to be a
>thin piece of gold foil with adhesive backing that you place underneath
>the battery of your cell phone. It claims to boost the signal reception of
>your cell phone.
>
...........
>
>What do you think?
>

ground plane ???
reflector ???

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2001\08\27@124732 by Jim
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  "I imagine it couples with internal
   circuitry, and possible wouldn't pass
   normal emissions tests, or at least
   would have higher levels of emissions."

Good point. Very good point.

This 'internal antenna' BS turns my gut every time
I see it.

*I* should be so unscrupulous so as to market
something as vapid as that on TV and bilk millions
from the unsuspecting non-technical 'consumers' (a
term I despise as well) of technology.

How does the "Canons Of Ethics Of Engineers" as
printed in ESCHBACH ("Hdbk of Enginering
Fundamentals") begin again?

"I. Will be honest and impartial, and will serve with
    devotion his employer, his clients, and the public."

I'd still like to see "range plots" of a 'before
and after' using the 'internal antenna' just to
remain 'impartial' ...

Jim


{Original Message removed}

2001\08\27@130219 by Dave Dilatush

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Matthew Fries wrote...

>Alright, I have been seeing so many commercials about this thing and have
>wondered how it could possibly work.
>
>In case you have not heard of it, the "internal antenna" looks to be a
>thin piece of gold foil...

[snip]

>Is this in fact just a bunch of hooey, or does it have any credability as
>a valid device?
>
>What do you think?

I think it works (for the seller) as follows:

1.  Gullible customer forks over $29.95 or whatever for one of
   these things and slaps it onto his cellphone;

2.  Customer doesn't notice any improvement, and begins to feel
   sheepish for having been a dolt;

3a. Customer continues watching those advertisements, seeing that
   ditzey blonde frown and shake her head at one cell phone (the
   one that's not ringing) and then smile at the other cell phone
   (the one with the "internal antenna", which is ringing), and
   begins to wonder if he installed the device wrong; or

3b. Customer doesn't want to feel like a dumb rube, so he begins to
   imagine that the device is actually doing something for his
   reception; and finally,

4.  By the time enough people get around to filing consumer fraud
   complaints with the authorities, the principals have fled to
   the Bahamas.

Not sure, and I may be completely wrong, but I think that's how the
"internal antenna" works.

Dave

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2001\08\27@133919 by John Ferrell

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I agree that the foil inside the telephone is snake oil.

However,  passive antenna systems do work in the real world.  Getting
Handy-Talkies to work from well shielded areas is usually a lost cause. If
you bring a coax in from a good resonant antenna and let it hang on the wall
you notice a significant improvement. Maybe even enough to be considered
good!

A very good reason for doing this is to keep emergency communications up
during lightning conditions. I understand that a loop on the coax makes
things even better but that requires handling the coax.

I would imagine that the passive Cell antennas that feature an antenna on
the roof of a car with a coax inside the car but not directly connected to
the phone would provide a marginal boost.

I think you could market a foil skull cap and make zero claims for it and
still do a brisk business.
John Ferrell
6241 Phillippi Rd
Julian NC 27283
Phone: (336)685-9606
Dixie Competition Products
NSRCA 479 AMA 4190  W8CCW
"My Competition is Not My Enemy"



{Original Message removed}

2001\08\28@071643 by Alan B. Pearce

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>3b. Customer doesn't want to feel like a dumb rube, so he begins to
>    imagine that the device is actually doing something for his


Do you not mean "dumb blond" (see point 3a)
No disrespect to any blonds on this list (they would not be dumb ones to be
here anyway) :)))

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2001\08\29@161132 by Peter L. Peres

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In addition to being baloney (it is not really), it may shape or distort
the field from the whip such that some part of it may or may not pass
though the void that in some people holds the brain. It may also distort
the far field such that you will have to face a particular direction to
get good contact in marginal areas.

I would not say anything about this until I saw a radiation pattern
comparison.

What I would say however is that metal bodied phones like Ericsson etc do
not need any of this.

Peter

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2001\08\29@165421 by Mike Kendall

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My guess is that it does increase the performance of the antenna and this is
why I'm saying it.  With a plastic bodied telephone and a whip that does not
have a decent counterpoise (the newer units are going to have a fractal
antenna to allow transmission on cell phone bands and receipt of GPS signals
to comply with the FCC requirement so the whip is not applicable with them).
With the metal of the "battery antenna enhancer"....even if it was a piece
of copper foil tape instead of the fancy looking geometric shape that they
get to charge you for, there should be a better capacitive coupling into the
hand of the person holding it.  My guess is that the cell phone user's body
becomes a human counterpoise electrically equivalent to a very lossy ground
on the marconi cell phone antenna (loaded whip) along with the fact that the
first electrical part of that is the foil tape itself.  Half of a Marconi is
the ground plane.
Mike Kendall
{Original Message removed}

2001\08\29@170043 by Sean Breheny

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Hi Mike,

For what you are saying to be true, the metal foil of the "internal
antenna" would have to be connected (either directly or capacitively) to
the phone's ground. I haven't seen one of these "internal antennas" but I
don't see how it is coupled to the phone.

Sean


On Wed, 29 Aug 2001, Mike Kendall wrote:

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2001\08\29@175336 by Jim

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I thnk I may have found who 'designed'
these things ...

Jim

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To: <EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2001 2:10 PM
Subject: [OT] Internal Antenna baloney!


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2001\08\29@202041 by Mike Kendall

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Hi Sean,
  Yes I agree and I bet it is capacitively coupled if it does in fact work.
A magnetic base of a mobile whip has no problems capacitively coupling into
the metal car through the paint.  Nobody would know for sure without
actually testing this out but a solid copper foil may ground out even better
than the stupid looking antenna element.  I'd give it greater than 50/50
that the entire thing is a total sham that could not be properly documented
in any way.  Why don't they publish the data proving them right??  I've seen
antenna scams before.  There was a guy who claimed to have patents and was
selling his junk to the military (or at least trying)  He had people pluging
in his small piece of junk into everything from satellite backpack radios to
medium power vehicle VHF radios.  NOSC in Point Loma even measured the
antenna in a hyperbolic chamber and exposed him scientifically.  All that
didn't slow down the herd of uneducated believers that refused to listen to
sound advise.  I would classify the stick-on antenna as a "placebo cellular
phone antenna".  It works in the minds of the people who need to justify
their purchase and feel better....or maybe it does work better?  Personally,
I would never modify my cell phone in the first place.  I've seen people
clip portable yagis into the windows of their car and talk from San Clemente
island back to the mainland on cells over 50miles.
Mike
{Original Message removed}


'[PICLIST] [OT] Internal Antenna baloney!'
2001\09\04@120551 by Mik Kim
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It is _very_ unlikely capacitively coupled to _anything_. As people pointed
out, the foil does not conduct anything to anywhere. I give it less than
1e-99 % chance that it works for most of us.

However, for people who believe the aliens gave IC technology to Intel so
Andy Groves can let Bill Gates make billions (Gates is really an Alien from
dark-star called Yuaranut), this foil will work just fine. The foil,
afterall, was designed by even more advanced aliens who gave Qualcomm
(Jacobs is also an Alien, but from an alternate universe called
Beeghaepmaecheen) the CDMA technology! Then they got dissatisfied with QCOM
management and went to Nokia (Finland? isn't that in Buulcheet star
system?), but I digress...

As for the Yagi, was this car a blueish van with bunch of computer equipment
inside?


{Quote hidden}

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