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'[PICLIST] [EE}: Do you solder SMD inside toaster o'
2000\12\27@111405 by Lawrence Lile

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The short answer is YES  I have used toaster ovens for reflow soldering.

I can't find my notes on this, so some of this is from memory.  (Gonna save
this message this time)

I used either a Toastmaster Model  316 or 317 toaster oven  or Toastmaster
model 7091 or 7093 convection oven.  The convection oven will probably give
you the best results, but it retails for about $120.  The toaster oven
retails for about $30.

The critical thing is to get the parts to change temperature on a
predictable curve.  You must slowly ( 5 minutes) raise the temperature of
the part until it reaches 215C/419F.  This is about as high as the oven will
go anyway and about as fast as it will heat anyway, so this is an easy
profile to hit.

 I used to set the oven at 100C/212F, set the part in there and get it warm
for a few minutes, then crank the temperature all the way up.  As soon as
the thermostat cycles (you can tell this by measuring amps drawn by the
oven) you've reached the proper peak temperature so open the door and shut
off the oven.  You don't want the parts to remain in the oven very long at
all, yet you do not want to disturb them while they are molten.  They can
cool rapidly after peak temperature is reached.

A better way is to attach a temperature sensor like a thermocouple directly
to the board, and watch the board temperature.  Aim for 1 minute at
215C/419F, then cool it down.  If you don't have a thermocouple or some
other lightweight accurate thermometer,  then don't worry about this method.

Another prototype method is to get a hot air rework gun.  I've heard people
say this is a very effective way of doing one-off surface mount.  I have
tried a heat gun not made for the purpose, and ended up torching the boards,
so don't try this without the proper tools.

Here is a good app note on surface mount soldering in general:
http://www.minicircuits.com/appnote/appnote0-42.htm

You'll need paste solder and paste flux, as well as some syringes to apply
it.

I use solder from a kit I bought through Digikey.  The link is dead on their
website so you'll have to call them at 1-800-344-4539.

I had to practice several times on scrap boards before I got it right.


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'[PICLIST] [EE}: Do you solder SMD inside toaster o'
2001\08\27@093255 by Lawrence Lile
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Neil,
Apparently you found some answers to these already, but in case not, here
goes:

----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil Gandler" <.....neil_gandlerKILLspamspam@spam@getmai.com>
> #1 If you used a toaster oven with a convection fan, did it work better
than
> a standard toaster
>  oven?

Fans are better, but not required.



>
> #2 What brand and type of solder paste did you use? I am seeing
> recommendations to use
> a solder with atleast 2% silver.

I used a kit available from Digikey  http://www.digikey.com  that came with paste
solder, paste flux, dispensing tubes.  It's pretty handy. It's just called
Surface Mount Soldering Kit.

>
> #3. With the solder paste you used, did you need to add flux?
>

Yes.  Paste flux can also serve double duty.  Put a dob on your component
and stick it down on the PC board where you want it, if you are using a
regular fine tip soldering iron this can free up a hand.

> #4 What type of precision temperature gauge did you use? As we both know
you
> can never rely on the inaccurate thermostat knobs on most toaster ovens.
>

I have a thermocouple and a digital thermocouple meter handy in my lab
anyway.  For the home hacker, this might be a tough thing to get.  You can
get a pretty fair thermocouple meter from radio shack (their high-end
do-it-all voltmeter has a thermocouple input) or some of the other outfits
that make these 20-in-1 voltmeters(Metex, Exetech)  My Metex meter is the
Best hundred bucks I ever spent.

> #5. Do you have a text log on the heating and cooling cycles you used to
get
> the best results? If you can include the brand and model toaster oven,
even
> better!
>
> #6 Have you found an effective "ozone safe" flux remover, considering that
> todays mandatory environmentallu friendly requirement has made these flux
> removers less effective.
>

Nope.  I just use the flux remover in cans avail from Mouser or Digikey.
Don't know what's in it, but it will take the paint off anything.

> #7 This may be a stupid question, but would it be safe to reflow your
boards
> in the same toaster oven you use for food?

NO NO NO NO

The only problem I can see, is if
> vapors from the soldering chemicals deposit inside the oven and revaporize
> and settle on the food cooked inside. I mention this since a convection
> toaster oven costs around $200. It would be nice to use for food as well.
>

You need a cheap knockoff.  Try one of our 300 series.  http://www.toastmaster.com
TM316  $29.99 retail.  No fan, probably works as well as any.   Note: Yes I
do work for Toastmaster.

--Lawrence Lile

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2001\08\28@042734 by Alan B. Pearce

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>I have a thermocouple and a digital thermocouple meter handy in my lab
>anyway.  For the home hacker, this might be a tough thing to get.  You can
>get a pretty fair thermocouple meter from radio shack (their high-end
>do-it-all voltmeter has a thermocouple input) or some of the other outfits
>that make these 20-in-1 voltmeters(Metex, Exetech)  My Metex meter is the
>Best hundred bucks I ever spent.

Fluke have a very handy thermocouple module that will plug into any
voltmeter, their model number is 80TK. It has a connector that will take a
standard thermocouple plug, and two banana plugs on 3/4 inch centres that
fit most meters. It is switchable to read directly in C or F. They are not
especially cheap, but are real convenient if needing to measure temperatures
outside the "normal" 0 to 100C range.

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