Searching \ for ' [EE] Low Power options' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/power.htm?key=power
Search entire site for: 'Low Power options'.

No exact or substring matches. trying for part
PICList Thread
'[PICLIST] [EE] Low Power options'
2001\09\04@103232 by Giles Honeycutt

picon face
OK, I have been looking at using LDO regulators to run a battery operated
device.  My problem is the device can operate at very low voltages and I
want to run the battery down as much as possible before it is changed.  I
have a PIC controlling it and that is limiting the life due to the voltage
requirements of the PIC.
Searching around I found the MAX1724 DC-DC converters in a SOT23-5 package.
( it is a new product for Maxim)
Has anyone used this?  It looks very interesting; it can take a 0.8-5.5
input and output a regulated voltage to drive a PIC. Drawback is it needs an
inductor.
1.5u Amp

Best regards,
Giles


_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


2001\09\04@115132 by Mr MCU

flavicon
face
Hi Giles,

Although MAX makes some good parts, I would suggest to use Seiko PFM series of switchers (pn 8323 / 8324 series).  Not
only are they much less $$, around US$0.50 each, but you can actually buy them.  Check out the line at Mouser, or their
other distributors.

We have used many of their switchers in battery powered products and can tell you that they work great.  As a matter of
fact, the typical current draw while they are ON is generally in the 10uA range, off <0.5uA.  Most with internal
switching transistor have outputs in the 100-300Ma range.  By using one of their parts that need an external switching
transistor, you can get just about any current that you need.  The cost of an inductor (around US$0.50) makes it a low
cost PS in the 100-300Ma range.

We normally run them on so that the micro can be in sleep mode to allow an event to wake it up.  10uA may sound like a
lot, but do the math with the batteries that you are using, and you should see that it is almost of no concern assuming
that the micro will be used.

- Mike



Giles Honeycutt wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com hint: PICList Posts must start with ONE topic:
[PIC]:,[SX]:,[AVR]: ->uP ONLY! [EE]:,[OT]: ->Other [BUY]:,[AD]: ->Ads


More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2001 , 2002 only
- Today
- New search...