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PICList Thread
'[PIC]What are some good books on PIC18 microcontro'
2010\02\05@180306 by Nathan House

picon face
I've done a few small projects with PIC microcontrollers but am struggling
to do more advanced things because I don't have a firm foundation of
knowledge. Are there any books related to the PIC18s that you could
recommend to me? One book that I've found is called "PIC Microcontroller: An
Introduction to Software & Hardware Interfacing." It's very expensive as
it's used as a textbook, but looks really good.

Thanks for your advice!

2010\02\05@190821 by MCH

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face
Not necessarily a 'book' (it depends on how you look at it), but
<http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/39631E.pdf> is an
excellent reference for this popular PIC. There are data sheets on all
the PICs in case that one does not interest you.

Anything you want to know about the software is in that PDF. Although
sometimes example code does help. Some sections do have sample code.

Joe M.

Nathan House wrote:
> I've done a few small projects with PIC microcontrollers but am struggling
> to do more advanced things because I don't have a firm foundation of
> knowledge. Are there any books related to the PIC18s that you could
> recommend to me? One book that I've found is called "PIC Microcontroller: An
> Introduction to Software & Hardware Interfacing." It's very expensive as
> it's used as a textbook, but looks really good.
>
> Thanks for your advice!

2010\02\05@191928 by Nathan House

picon face
I've read the datasheet for my PIC, or at least most of it, but I need
something that goes into more detail explaining how things work.

2010\02\06@064838 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 07:19 PM 2/5/2010, you wrote:
>I've read the datasheet for my PIC, or at least most of it, but I need
>something that goes into more detail explaining how things work.

http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/39500a.pdf

..describes how things work in great detail, right down to the Q cycles of
each instruction.



Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
spam_OUTspeffTakeThisOuTspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com



2010\02\06@085956 by M.L.

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On Fri, Feb 5, 2010 at 7:19 PM, Nathan House <.....nathanpiclistKILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:
> I've read the datasheet for my PIC, or at least most of it, but I need
> something that goes into more detail explaining how things work.

I think maybe what you're looking for is the opposite, the bigger
picture. More detail than the datasheet is more detail than any of us
need to use the parts.

Digital logic / computer engineering:
www.amazon.com/Computer-Engineering-Hardware-Morris-Mano/dp/0131629263/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265464538&sr=8-5
A bargain at $0.35 used.

www.amazon.com/Design-Embedded-Systems-68HC12-Microcontrollers/dp/0130832081/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265464643&sr=1-12
It's about the HC11 but it gives nice detail on how microcontrollers
work. It's a bit more expensive than the other book, at $16.


--
Martin K.

2010\02\06@104809 by Scott

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Nathan House wrote:
> I've done a few small projects with PIC microcontrollers but am struggling
> to do more advanced things because I don't have a firm foundation of
> knowledge. Are there any books related to the PIC18s that you could
> recommend to me? One book that I've found is called "PIC Microcontroller: An
> Introduction to Software & Hardware Interfacing." It's very expensive as
> it's used as a textbook, but looks really good.
>
> Thanks for your advice!
>  
Greetings!

   What's your upper limit? I saw that book, ISBN 9781401839673, on
half.com for $58.34.
I'm exactly sure what you're looking for, but there are actually a lot
of free resources for learning about PIC micros
available on the internet.

Scott

2010\02\06@105826 by Richard Seriani

picon face

----- Original Message -----
From: "Nathan House" <nathanpiclistspamKILLspamgmail.com>
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <.....piclistKILLspamspam.....mit.edu>
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2010 6:03 PM
Subject: [PIC]What are some good books on PIC18 microcontrollers?


> I've done a few small projects with PIC microcontrollers but am struggling
> to do more advanced things because I don't have a firm foundation of
> knowledge. Are there any books related to the PIC18s that you could
> recommend to me? One book that I've found is called "PIC Microcontroller:
> An
> Introduction to Software & Hardware Interfacing." It's very expensive as
> it's used as a textbook, but looks really good.
>
> Thanks for your advice!
> --
Nathan,

Here are two that may provide some information.

"Designing Embedded Systems with PIC Microcontrollers, Principles and
Applications" by Tim Wilmshurst has chapters on the 18Fxx2. I have the first
edition so I don't know if any different, but the second edition is $30.92
at Amazon.

Another is (the misnamed) "Microprocessors: From Assembly Language to C
Using the PICI8FXX" by Robert Reese. New is $44.07 at Amazon. Used for a lot
less.

Good luck,
Richard


2010\02\06@120740 by Byron Jeff

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On Sat, Feb 06, 2010 at 06:54:07AM -0500, Spehro Pefhany wrote:
> At 07:19 PM 2/5/2010, you wrote:
> >I've read the datasheet for my PIC, or at least most of it, but I need
> >something that goes into more detail explaining how things work.
>
> ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/39500a.pdf
>
> ..describes how things work in great detail, right down to the Q cycles of
> each instruction.

The Family reference manuals are in fact a valuable resource. Every
designer should have a copy.

But as a reference manual, like the datasheet, it may not be in a format
that's at an appropriate level of abstraction for a novice designer. While
anyone who has done PIC development at any level would be driven absolutely
nuts, sometimes a tutorial such as this one:

http://www.pic18f.com/tutorial/2007/12/06/tutorial-2-hello-world

or the assembly overview:

http://www.pic18f.com/tutorial/2007/12/04/18f4550-and-assembly-overview/

is the appropiate level of discussion.

The OP should probably come back and tell is a bit about his
microcontroller development experience. Then we can get a better bead
on what may be appropriate.

BTW I agree with the other posters in the thread. Pretty much everything
you need to know about PIC chips, at any level, is available on the web.
Unless a textbook format is your primary learning style, since cost is an
issue, search for PIC 18F tutorials to come across sites such as the one
above.

Hope this helps,

BAJ

2010\02\06@132547 by Nathan House

picon face
Thank you for your book suggestions.

I know the datasheets go into great detail, but what I said was "more detail
*explaining* how things work." I can read a datasheet over and over again,
but if I don't understand what it's saying (which is a lot of the time) then
it doesn't help me much. I also don't have a clue how PICs work at a low
level; the few small projects I've done (making LEDs blink, using digital
I/O, PWM, etc..) were all written in C -- I don't even know assembly.

Right now I'm trying to use the SIE on the PIC18F4550 without using the
Microchip USB Framework (i.e. I'm trying to write all of my code from
scratch so that I understand how everything works), and I'm struggling
because I don't understand how the PIC actually works. (e.g. I don't know
how to do things like putting variables into certain blocks of memory, for
just *one* example).

I'm a student, not an engineer (yet). What I need is a comprehensive book
explaining how the PICs work, but written for people like me who aren't
familiar with a lot of the terms and concepts that the datasheets
*expect*you to already know when reading them.

2010\02\06@155338 by Scott

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Nathan House wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I'm the same way when it comes to the 200+ pg data sheets. They tell you
exactly _how_ it works, true, but not how to _use_ it; how to apply it.

Try gooligum.com.au and have a look at all their tutorials. Great into
site. All their tutorials are free PDFs you can
download and/or print. If I recall, they assume no prior micro
experience. The chips they refer to are only low and mid
range (12 and 16 series), but it build well on most features of micros.

http://www.mikroe.com/en/books/picmcubook/ is another free ebook resource.
http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/noppp/picassem2004.pdf another free
PDF specific to beginner pic assembly
programming.

There are a lot of other resources as well - searching with terms such
as "pic" with  terms  like beginner tutorial howto etc
should yield a lot of other resources that might help even more.

In print, I picked up the text book Programming & Customizing PICmicro
Microcontrollers, Myke Predko for $4.43 on eBay - try searching for pic
or picmicro or microcontroller - you might find some good deals on good
books.

I'm completely new to micros; so I've been looking around quite bit. I
hope this helps.

Scott

2010\02\06@174515 by Byron Jeff

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face
On Sat, Feb 06, 2010 at 01:25:47PM -0500, Nathan House wrote:
> Thank you for your book suggestions.
>
> I know the datasheets go into great detail, but what I said was "more detail
> *explaining* how things work." I can read a datasheet over and over again,
> but if I don't understand what it's saying (which is a lot of the time) then
> it doesn't help me much. I also don't have a clue how PICs work at a low
> level; the few small projects I've done (making LEDs blink, using digital
> I/O, PWM, etc..) were all written in C -- I don't even know assembly.

So we have an abstraction issue.

Over there years there have been many debates about the appropriate level
and language for learning to use PICs. I've always been an advocate for
learning assembly well enough to read it. Primarily because of the issues
you raise above. PIC assembly is the trade language. The vast majority of
the documentation uses assembly for its examples.

{Quote hidden}

So you are looking for a tutorial.

Just an opinion here. I think that unfortunately you've decided to rip off
the abstraction BandAid with one of the toughest tasks to tackle: USB. The
problem is that USB is an extensive and complicated stack.

This is actually a place where a high level language and a good framework
can help you. It gives the appropriate level of abstraction so that you can
get the job done, instead of investing a lot of time trying to figure out a
really complicated infrastructure.

I would suggest backing off to something simple. For example take on a
project that you've already done in C, then recode it in assembly. Leave
the USB part out. It's too complicated.

Just my two cents.

BAJ

2010\02\06@195601 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Sun, Feb 7, 2010 at 2:25 AM, Nathan House <EraseMEnathanpiclistspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:

> Right now I'm trying to use the SIE on the PIC18F4550 without using the
> Microchip USB Framework (i.e. I'm trying to write all of my code from
> scratch so that I understand how everything works), and I'm struggling
> because I don't understand how the PIC actually works. (e.g. I don't know
> how to do things like putting variables into certain blocks of memory, for
> just *one* example).
>

I think Byron Jeff's advise is good: "Leave the USB part out. It's too
complicated".

USB is never simple and it is not a good start when you have not
learned the basics well. The few people who have written assembly
based USB stacks (like Olin Lathrop and Brad Minch) are all experts.
Even if you want to use C, USB is not a good start either.

From:
http://www.microchip.com/forums/tm.aspx?m=472405

Agustín Tomás has a point. Why USB section in Microchip forum
is very popular?
"Interpretations you could make of such a high rate of posting:
The most poorly understood subject nowadays.
The most difficult implementation you could try with PICs.
A technology inherently hard / complicate to implement (not
judging how good / bad it is). "


--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

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