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PICList Thread
'[PIC] Talking PIC's !'
2007\09\30@230400 by Xiaofan Chen

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On 10/1/07, Robin Abbott <spam_OUTrobin.abbottTakeThisOuTspamfored.co.uk> wrote:

> Would be interested to know if anyone else has experimented and what results
> might have been obtained. MP3 playback would be much more efficient on
> memory storage but I suspect would be a nightmare on processor load ! I am
> also having trouble finding a good, low component count, audio amp for 5V.
>
> Happy to share source and ideas !

I like the following links.
1) USB sound card with 18F4550 and PIC PWM
home.comcast.net/~armag1234/soundcard.html
http://forum.microchip.com/tm.aspx?m=231496

2) PIC based audio player
http://forum.microchip.com/tm.aspx?m=267094

3) Is this possible: dsPIC MP3 decoder/player?
http://forum.microchip.com/tm.aspx?m=166133
http://www.opencircuits.com/Music_Player (with dedicated
decoder, PIC16/18 can play MP3 as well).
http://www.k9spud.com/traxmod/ (wave is not a problem
for dsPIC)

NXP has a nice implemenation of MP3 player using
LPC2148. The new LPC2888 will be even nice.
http://www.nxp.com/acrobat_download/applicationnotes/AN10583_1.pdf

Xiaofan


'[PIC] Talking PIC's !'
2007\10\02@182918 by Zik Saleeba
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I've used the speakjet. It's quite a fun chip. It's more advanced than
the old-style speech synthesiser chips but don't expect miracles. It's
pretty hard to make true natural sounding speech with it but it is
better than the old-style robot voices.

Cheers,
Zik

On 10/2/07, Dwayne Reid <.....dwaynerKILLspamspam@spam@planet.eon.net> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\10\03@144721 by Robin Abbott

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Yes I remember experimeting with Allophones in the 80's with a chip - I
think it might have been the SP-0256-AL2 from GI. It worked quite well and
was very efficient - most words can be stored in Allophones in less bytes
than normal text. However I particularly remember W's and V's as being awful
!


Robin Abbott
Forest Electronics - Home of WIZ-C, ANSI C Compiler for PIC's with RAD front
end.
.....robin.abbottKILLspamspam.....fored.co.uk
http://www.fored.co.uk


{Original Message removed}

2007\10\03@183940 by Jinx

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> Yes I remember experimenting with Allophones in the 80's with
> a chip - I think it might have been the SP-0256-AL2 from GI. It
> worked quite well and was very efficient - most words can be
> stored in Allophones in less bytes than normal text. However I
> particularly remember W's and V's as being awful !

I thought of playing around with the Commodore 64's SID chip.
There were a couple of pretty good text-to-speech programs at
the time, early 80s. Big Mouth was one. I have the feeling there
was some ring modulation involved, because of the tone quality
deterioration if you pushed a little too far with voice settings. Like
a squeaky Stephen Hawking. Programs and games with embedded
speech probably used sampling. Impossible Mission's Vincent Price
for example, which wasn't too bad at all

I do have some SID chips (ex dead C64s) but have never gotten
around to hooking up a PIC to one. Without a real application,
no pressing incentive to do so apart from curiosity unfortunately


2007\10\03@185133 by Dario Greggio
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Jinx wrote:

> I do have some SID chips (ex dead C64s) but have never gotten
> around to hooking up a PIC to one. Without a real application,
> no pressing incentive to do so apart from curiosity unfortunately

I should have 4 of them somewhere too!

Yes, i remember Mission Impossible and its voice

--
Ciao, Dario

2007\10\04@062204 by Howard Winter

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Robin,

On Wed, 3 Oct 2007 19:46:38 +0100, Robin Abbott wrote:

> Yes I remember experimeting with Allophones in the 80's with a chip - I
> think it might have been the SP-0256-AL2 from GI. It worked quite well and
> was very efficient - most words can be stored in Allophones in less bytes
> than normal text. However I particularly remember W's and V's as being awful

Ah yes, I remember that chip - I had a play around with a little black box that plugged into a BBC Micro - fun, but with the power of that machine it wasn't really
feasible to do proper text-to-speech.  Using the "obvious" allophones for the letters just didn't work, you had to get quite creative to make it understandable.  And
one problem was that after listening to it for a while you got used to its "accent" and started understanding it when anyone coming to it fresh was bewildered.  
You needed a supply of people who hadn't heard it before to judge whether it was understandable by "the man on the Clapham omnibus" :-)

I still have it somewhere (and a couple of BBC Micros) - one day I may find it and have another play around.

Cheers,


Howard Winter
St.Albans, England


2007\10\04@093458 by PAUL James

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Jinx,

I could use one of the SID chips.  Would you be willing to part with
one?  What cost?
Please advise.


                                                               Thanks
and Regards,

       
Jim

{Original Message removed}

2007\10\04@094955 by Dario Greggio (in giro)

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> I could use one of the SID chips.  Would you be willing to part with
> one?  What cost?
> Please advise.

where are you located?
:)

--
Ciao,
Dario


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Leggi GRATIS le tue mail con il telefonino i-mode™ di Wind
http://i-mode.wind.it/

2007\10\04@101139 by PAUL James

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Dario,

The Houston, Texas area in the USA.

Thanks, Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: EraseMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu [piclist-bouncesspamspam_OUTmit.edu] On Behalf
Of Dario Greggio (in giro)
Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2007 8:50 AM
To: piclist
Subject: RE: [PIC] Talking PIC's !

> I could use one of the SID chips.  Would you be willing to part with
> one?  What cost?
> Please advise.

where are you located?
:)

--
Ciao,
Dario


------------------------------------------------------
Leggi GRATIS le tue mail con il telefonino i-mode(tm) di Wind
http://i-mode.wind.it/


2007\10\04@102650 by Dario Greggio (in giro)

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> The Houston, Texas area in the USA.

Hmm, ok, I see...
a bit too expensive to send one of mine to you :)



--
Ciao,
Dario


------------------------------------------------------
Leggi GRATIS le tue mail con il telefonino i-mode™ di Wind
http://i-mode.wind.it/

2007\10\04@164826 by Jinx

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> I could use one of the SID chips.  Would you be willing to part
> with one?  What cost? Please advise

I'm in New Zealand. I'm sure you could find a dead or cheap C64
in Texas. There must be millions of them still lurking about

Googling for Commodore 6581 shows some on eBay

=====================

HardSID - The SID 6581/8580 (C64) MIDI Synthesizer SoundCard for PC

http://www.hardsid.com/

=====================

PS, if anyone doesn't realise the capabilities of the SID chip, just
Google for Commodore SID

http://www.joogn.de/b/6581.pdf

Commodore's enhancement of the 6522 was very useful (they
added timers and TOD to make the 6526)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_64

I feel like powering one up right now !!!! Just to see The Blue
Screen Of Life ;-))

2007\10\05@114301 by Martin McCormick

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       I sure remember the SPO256 and the companion ROM to do
text-to-speech. It is a shame that there is nothing that cheap
around these days. You could make it sound pretty decent with a
little effort.

       I must admit that I did not get in on the first of this
thread because I accidentally deleted it the last time I zeroed
out the PIC list folder, but you can do speech synthesis by
analysis (just record someone's voice), by writing
a storage routine similar to the little demo program that was
used on the original Apple II's. That system used the Mostech
6502 CPU and ran at an event rate of slightly above 1 MHZ. I say
that because any of the common PIC's like the 16F84 or even 12C
series PIC's can positively scream by comparison in a speed test
so that isn't going to be the problem.

       The Apple's speech storage program used the 741 op-amp
cassette interface input which was wired to act like a Schmidt
Trigger. There was no A-D converter nor even a low-pass filter
here. The audio wave form, as I understand it, caused a sort of
dirty pulse-width modulation in the output of the 741. The
program flipped bits on and off in a range of memory to mimic
what the 741's output did.

       When you played it back, the playback program read one
bit at a time and compaired it with the last bit. If there was a
change, it strobed the speaker flipflop and clicked the speaker
once per change. This effectively reproduced that very dirty
pulse-width output. The speaker's own limited response acted as
a low-pass filter to take some, but not much, of the sampling
out of it.

       You could understand digits pretty well and many words.
There was no way you would mistake it for proper A/D-based
audio, but it was good for games and I think one could use it
for maybe a talking thermometer or a warning message.

       I haven't tried it, but I see no reason why a PIC
couldn't do this with no trouble. You've even got better
interrupt-based timing than was available in the Apple, at least
it wasn't available without a lot of hardware mods.

       I would imagine that one might want to connect an
external EPROM to a PIC and store the bit patterns in that if
several seconds of speech were involved.

       You will go through memory at about 8 Kb/sec or about 1
kilobyte per second.

       Your algorithm will also have to be very clean about
timing because this technique for generating audio is bad enough
as it is without little extra hits from timing jitter as you
step through the single bits to record or play your sound.

       Just a thought.

Martin McCormick WB5AGZ  Stillwater, OK
Systems Engineer
OSU Information Technology Department Network Operations Group

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