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'[PIC] Survey on PIC usage.'
2006\02\02@051853 by kravnus wolf

picon face
Out of curiosity, how many home projects(used
everyday) did you use
PIC for?

PIC - 16F873A Door bell.

John

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2006\02\02@094030 by Peter Todd

picon face
On Thu, Feb 02, 2006 at 02:18:21AM -0800, kravnus wolf wrote:
> Out of curiosity, how many home projects(used
> everyday) did you use
> PIC for?
>
> PIC - 16F873A Door bell.

16F84A - Tachometer for my mill. I was greatly amused when I realised
how rediculous it was to use a PIC running at 20mhz, twice the
clockspeed of my first computer, just to measure a low-RPM spindle. I
calculated it out, and found that the max RPM it could measure was about
1 million something... I ended up multiplexing the 4 digit LED display
on it at something like 20khz... Dunno if a mill is quite a "home
project" though...


Also have some plans to make a outdoor temp sensor thingy using a PIC
and a one wire chip for my apartment. There's this hole in my wall that
goes clear to the outside. Pretty sure it's from an old cable TV
retrofit that's since been re-retrofitted to a different hole. It's
sealed with a bit of caulking and I was thinking of pushing the sensor
through and using a PIC attached to something nifty like an analog panel
meter for the readout, like the "clock" I built for a customer,
http://petertodd.ca/art/meter_clock.php He uses, or at least looks at,
that everyday, so maybe that counts?

--
spam_OUTpeteTakeThisOuTspampetertodd.ca http://www.petertodd.ca

2006\02\02@101819 by andrew kelley

picon face
Oh I made a couple of different sorts of timers for my grandfather,
one that has a settable delay(16f84), by pushing a button and then
pushing it again when its long enough (interval timing, beeps ever
interval indefinitely) and a AC timer (f84 again) that would go up to
4 hours with about 200ms error at most which is settable in 15 minute
steps. and I made myself a LCD display for a linux box without a
monitor so I could listen to music in my room.

--
andrew

2006\02\02@102325 by Herbert Graf

flavicon
face
On Thu, 2006-02-02 at 02:18 -0800, kravnus wolf wrote:
> Out of curiosity, how many home projects(used
> everyday) did you use
> PIC for?
>
> PIC - 16F873A Door bell.
>

Of the ones I can remember (which I use pretty much daily):

http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff
16F877 - logan
16F628 - carmondi
16F877 - carmon

My house monitor network (so far, more to come):
30F4011
18F2320
30F3012

-----------------------------
Herbert's PIC Stuff:
http://repatch.dyndns.org:8383/pic_stuff/

2006\02\02@102919 by Timothy Weber

face picon face
kravnus wolf wrote:
> Out of curiosity, how many home projects(used
> everyday) did you use
> PIC for?

12F629 - power loss alarm for my sump pump.

<timothyweber.org/taxonomy_menu/1/2/10>
--
Timothy J. Weber
http://timothyweber.org

2006\02\02@123501 by Dennis J. Murray

picon face
Some of my "home" projects are also used in support of my consulting
business. Do they count?

- An automated corn feeder for game - feeds at dawn, dusk, and midway in
between.
- A digital tach, period, and frequency meter - uses either direct
signal input, contact closure, or optical sensor.
A single-axis digital readout for my router table using an optical encoder
- A dual-axis digital readout for my lathe/mill using optical encoders
(one per axis). The X-axis can be toggled between "DIAMETER" and
"RADIUS" display to minimize stupid human errors, depending on whether
you're using the mill or lathe.
- an ASCII keyboard/display unit to interface with PIC projects without
using my regular computer.
- An event counter/timer used to verify operation of some of my circuits
during their debug phase.
- A pulse generator that generates 1-4 pulses with different selectable
pulse widths and repetition rates (for more than one pulse, obviously).
Used to aid in debugging other circuits.
- As a controller chip for a home-designed electrical discharge machine
(EDM). Controls the stepper feed motor to maintain the selected
current/voltage across the spark gap.
- As a cable continuity tester for multi-conductor cable runs.
- As an infrared converter/repeater for extending the operation of
infrared remotes.

Also used in customer projects, most of which are proprietary and
outside the scope of this question.

Dennis

Peter Todd wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2006\02\02@220154 by kravnus wolf

picon face


--- "Dennis J. Murray" <.....denbarbKILLspamspam@spam@verizon.net> wrote:

> Some of my "home" projects are also used in support
> of my consulting
> business. Do they count?

Any home application counts :)

John

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2006\02\02@230158 by Peter van Hoof

face picon face
kravnus wolf kravnusspamKILLspamyahoo.com wrote:


>Out of curiosity, how many home projects(used
>everyday) did you use
>PIC for?

16F675 freezer door open alarm

Peter van Hoof

2006\02\03@030605 by kravnus wolf

picon face
Interesting application... May I know why ;)

John

--- Peter van Hoof <.....pvhoofKILLspamspam.....yahoo.com> wrote:

> kravnus wolf EraseMEkravnusspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTyahoo.com wrote:
>
>
> >Out of curiosity, how many home projects(used
> >everyday) did you use
> >PIC for?
>
> 16F675 freezer door open alarm
>  
> Peter van Hoof
> --

2006\02\03@080033 by Byron A Jeff

face picon face
> kravnus wolf kravnusspamspam_OUTyahoo.com wrote:
>
>
>Out of curiosity, how many home projects(used
>everyday) did you use
>PIC for?

I have three so far:

1) A 16F84 based basement light controller. It auto turns on the lights when
the basement door is opened and leaves them on about 90 seconds after the
door is closed. The unfinished basement has pull string lights and this
project eliminates the need to keep a light on down there.

2) My sunrise/sunset outdoor light controller. My wife likes the outside
lights on at night for security. It used to be my job to to turn them on
at night and off in the morning. The controller now does this by using
an embedded table of sunrise and sunset times from the beginning of each
month. It then interpolates the sunrise and sunset time based on the day
of the month and the fixed sunrise/sunset values from the tables. For
simplicity I used 32 day months, so the turn on turn off times are
approximate. It has a lot of interesting features:

- It uses a pot/switch interface from a scrapped light dimmer for data
 entry.
- It has a battery backup so that the time is retained during a power outage.
- It uses a 32 khz watch crystal for timing. It doesn't work too very well
 in the unconditioned basement space where the project is located. I
 implemented a cheap corrector using a $2 wall clock and a LED interruptor,
 but I couldn't get it stable.

Eventually I'd like to do some updates. The pot/switch interface has too much
bounce which causes difficulty in setting the date/time. I'd switch to using
like power for tracking time too.

3) My homebuilt thermostat has saved me a bunch of money. I finally figured
out that family will fiddle with the thermostat. My thermostat has no input
interface. It kicks on the AC at 77F and the heater at 71F. Also it runs the
unit in 12 minute intervals. The long run times go a long way to keeping
the space comfortable.

BAJ

2006\02\03@094653 by alan smith

picon face
oh....that reminds me....I need to build one of these....did you monitor the freezer temperature or just if the door is open?

kravnus wolf <@spam@kravnusKILLspamspamyahoo.com> wrote:  Interesting application... May I know why ;)

John

--- Peter van Hoof
wrote:

> kravnus wolf KILLspamkravnusKILLspamspamyahoo.com wrote:
>
>
> >Out of curiosity, how many home projects(used
> >everyday) did you use
> >PIC for?
>
> 16F675 freezer door open alarm
>
> Peter van Hoof
> --

2006\02\03@155332 by Shawn Wilton

picon face
>
> 3) My homebuilt thermostat has saved me a bunch of money. I finally
> figured
> out that family will fiddle with the thermostat. My thermostat has no
> input
> interface. It kicks on the AC at 77F and the heater at 71F. Also it runs
> the
> unit in 12 minute intervals. The long run times go a long way to keeping
> the space comfortable.


Cool.  But has anyone built a thermostate to replace one of those mercury
based thermos for base board heat?  I need/want to, but there's not way I'm
getting an AC transformer up there.

BAJ
> -

2006\02\03@171947 by Peter

picon face


> Interesting application... May I know why ;)
>>
>> 16F675 freezer door open alarm

Anti-beer-gets-warm-device ?

Peter

2006\02\03@192717 by Peter van Hoof

face picon face


Peter RemoveMEplpTakeThisOuTspamactcom.co.il wrote:


>> Interesting application... May I know why ;)
>>>
>>> 16F675 freezer door open alarm

>Anti-beer-gets-warm-device ?

>Peter

No beer in the freezer.

I needed one because the kids go
to the freezer downstairs to get ice cream and such. At one
time the door did not end up closed as usual and two days
later when my wife needed something from the basement we ended
up throwing out several hundred dollars of food.

I couldn't find a device that would do what I wanted it to do so I had
to build my own.

I bought a package of the simple "Home Alert" door alarms $10 for 4
And modified one with a 12f675 and a n channel fet to switch on the
old electronics if the reed contact was not closed within 1 minute
While the door is opened it will chirp every 10 seconds to remind
you to close the door (this also works as a battery test)

After screaming for a couple seconds it takes a break for a half minute
and the process repeats.

The pic sleeps most of the time the reed contact operates the INT input
all very simple.

Peter van Hoof

2006\02\04@024931 by Peter Todd

picon face
On Fri, Feb 03, 2006 at 04:27:17PM -0800, Peter van Hoof wrote:
> I bought a package of the simple "Home Alert" door alarms $10 for 4
> And modified one with a 12f675 and a n channel fet to switch on the
> old electronics if the reed contact was not closed within 1 minute
> While the door is opened it will chirp every 10 seconds to remind
> you to close the door (this also works as a battery test)
>  
> After screaming for a couple seconds it takes a break for a half minute
> and the process repeats.
>  
> The pic sleeps most of the time the reed contact operates the INT input
> all very simple.

Out of curiosity... Any reason why you didn't simply run the PICs power
through the reed switch itself? Or use a transistor operated by the reed
switch to turn on the PIC? Running in sleep mode seems kinda wastefull
to me rather than just totally turning the PIC off.


Incidentally your project kinda reminds me of one I want to do with my
fridge... It's a tiny "bar-fridge" sized model, sutable for my equally
tiny apartment. Works fine except that if the temperature is set such
that ice-cream stays solid in the freezer compartment, the rest of the
fridge ends up below zero! The two compartments aren't seperated, and
cooling for the fridge is provided by falling air from the freezer. (at
top) At worst if set to maximum the freezer part ends up at -30C (!) and
my milk is a solid -10C block...

My looney scheme was to put a small heater at the very bottom controlled
by a PIC with some temperature sensors. I'd have the heater add heat to
the fridge portion based on the temp sensor reading to keep it above
freezing so that the overall temperature differential would be greater.
Power would be supplied by thin insulated copper strips sneaking past
the door seal.  I suspect that the manufacture assumed in the design
that the door would be opened more often than it is, I'm practically
never home.

Fortunately my apartment has unmetered electricity...

--
spamBeGonepetespamBeGonespampetertodd.ca http://www.petertodd.ca

2006\02\04@025053 by Peter Todd

picon face
On Thu, Feb 02, 2006 at 12:35:10PM -0500, Dennis J. Murray wrote:
> - As a controller chip for a home-designed electrical discharge machine
> (EDM). Controls the stepper feed motor to maintain the selected
> current/voltage across the spark gap.

Love to hear more about that one, got a website on it?
--
TakeThisOuTpeteEraseMEspamspam_OUTpetertodd.ca http://www.petertodd.ca

2006\02\04@064606 by kravnus wolf

picon face
Looks like PIC is famous in saving the home appliance.
:) Thinking what else should I use PIC for at home.

John

--- Byron A Jeff <RemoveMEbyronspamTakeThisOuTcc.gatech.edu> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2006\02\04@081410 by Enrico Schuerrer

picon face
I have done a traffic light for my model railroad with 12F629, a changing illumination for a model house with TV set illumination :-) and at the moment I am working on an automatic turnloop switch (changing the polarity in the turnloop measuring the current in the loop).

regards

Enrico

2006\02\04@100539 by Dennis J. Murray

picon face
No web site, but I can probably send you enough info to keep you happy
for a day or two!! I wrote the code as a relative PIC newbie. Thus it
isn't relocatable, which gives me heartburn now! It IS well-commented
though! The PIC is a 16F628 and it controls the entire EDM operation,
from applying electrode power, to sensing limit switch conditions, to
the stepper motor (which controls the position of the electrode to
maintain whatever gap voltage is desired).

It is NOT a wire EDM, but rather one that uses an electrode that punches
though tough metal. For example: I've used it to punch square holes
though carbide lathe tools and also holes though HSS (tool steel) for
mounting hard cutters on relatively "soft" steel carrier shafts using
cap screws. Also had to use it once to remove a stuck grade 8 1/4" set
screw from an old jointer head. Wasn't fast, but WAS effective!

Email me off-line & I'll send you enough info & photos for you to make
one yourself, if you so desire!

BTW: It works great!

Let me know!
Dennis

P.S.
I want to make changes to the code, but haven't done it yet. Right now,
it needs a constant stream of "clean" water to flush out the debris. I
use a very small fountain pump - you don't need much flow. I want to
modify it to cycle the electrode up & down while immersed in the
coolant, thus "self-flushing" the spark gap. That's necessary if you
have a solid electrode and a deep hole. Usually I use a hollow electrode
with coolant running thru the center down to the spark gap.

The "cycle" feature isn't a hard change, just haven't gotten around to it!





Peter Todd wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2006\02\04@162022 by Dave Lag

picon face
Dennis J. Murray wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2006\02\05@020457 by Shawn Wilton

picon face
Simpler idea.  Buy a second fridge.

My looney scheme was to put a small heater at the very bottom controlled
> by a PIC with some temperature sensors. I'd have the heater add heat to
> the fridge portion based on the temp sensor reading to keep it above
> freezing so that the overall temperature differential would be greater.
> Power would be supplied by thin insulated copper strips sneaking past
> the door seal.  I suspect that the manufacture assumed in the design
> that the door would be opened more often than it is, I'm practically
> never home.
>

--

Shawn Wilton (b9 Systems)
http://b9Systems.com  <- New web page

2006\02\05@132638 by Peter

picon face

On Sat, 4 Feb 2006, Peter Todd wrote:

> My looney scheme was to put a small heater at the very bottom controlled
> by a PIC with some temperature sensors. I'd have the heater add heat to
> the fridge portion based on the temp sensor reading to keep it above
> freezing so that the overall temperature differential would be greater.
> Power would be supplied by thin insulated copper strips sneaking past
> the door seal.  I suspect that the manufacture assumed in the design
> that the door would be opened more often than it is, I'm practically
> never home.

Get hold of some 1/3 inch expanded polystyrene board, cut two
rectangular pieces as wide as the fridge, and slip them under the
freezer compartment. Set the gap between them (more or less overlap) to
regulate the cooling of the lower compartment.

Peter

2006\02\05@133455 by Peter Todd

picon face
On Sun, Feb 05, 2006 at 08:26:36PM +0200, Peter wrote:
> > My looney scheme was to put a small heater at the very bottom controlled
> > by a PIC with some temperature sensors. I'd have the heater add heat to
> > the fridge portion based on the temp sensor reading to keep it above
> > freezing so that the overall temperature differential would be greater.
> > Power would be supplied by thin insulated copper strips sneaking past
> > the door seal.  I suspect that the manufacture assumed in the design
> > that the door would be opened more often than it is, I'm practically
> > never home.
>
> Get hold of some 1/3 inch expanded polystyrene board, cut two
> rectangular pieces as wide as the fridge, and slip them under the
> freezer compartment. Set the gap between them (more or less overlap) to
> regulate the cooling of the lower compartment.

That's an excellent idea, I'll give it a try. The insulation could slide
in right where the drip tray for the freezer is, just have to remember
to replace it when defronsting.

Now why didn't I think of that before...  Oh, of course, your idea
doesn't run on electricity...

--
EraseMEpetespampetertodd.ca http://www.petertodd.ca

2006\02\06@134202 by Peter

picon face

On Sun, 5 Feb 2006, Peter Todd wrote:

{Quote hidden}

You could use static proof foam and stick a couple of pics in it. Come
to think of it, a self adjusting tray overlap using a servo and a
thermistor could be worth investigating ...

Peter

2006\02\06@150605 by Keith

flavicon
face
Thats what I was thinking, use the pic to open a door in the otherwise foam
sealed freezer compartment to regulate the fridge temp.

or you could use a bimetal spring to do the same thing....but this IS the
piclist

{Original Message removed}

2006\02\10@164406 by Sean Schouten

face picon face
I am in the process of 'implementing' a pic in two private projects that I
am busy with; One of them is an intelligent fan controller ; I have been
experimenting with software based PWM, and am waiting for a 1-wire
temperature sensor that I ordered to arrive so I can start playing with the
1-wire bus & protocol. The second project is actually a school project. I am
supposed to design a oscillator that can generate a *perfect* sine from
about 20Hz - 20 Khz, but I kind really got my self excited and decided to
embark on an adventure with a DDS (AD9834). I am thinking of implementing a
nice LCD with frequency counter and some *menu* options on it as well... All
in the name of science of course!

Sean

2006\02\12@022027 by kravnus wolf
picon face
I am also looking into the temp meter. Using Maxim
DS18S20. Freq generator to but no scope yet :(

John

--- Sean Schouten <RemoveMEdev.seantechEraseMEspamEraseMEgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2006\02\13@061038 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


>-----Original Message-----
>From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspam_OUTspamKILLspammit.edu [RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspamspammit.edu]
>Sent: 10 February 2006 21:44
>To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
>Subject: Re: [PIC] Survey on PIC usage.
>
>
>I am in the process of 'implementing' a pic in two private
>projects that I am busy with; One of them is an intelligent
>fan controller ; I have been experimenting with software based
>PWM, and am waiting for a 1-wire temperature sensor that I
>ordered to arrive so I can start playing with the 1-wire bus &
>protocol. The second project is actually a school project. I
>am supposed to design a oscillator that can generate a
>*perfect* sine from about 20Hz - 20 Khz,

Your project design specifiation should include just how pure the output must be, but "perfect" is not an acceptable, or acheivable design constraint.  You should be able to produce a very good sinusoid with carefull design though...

Regards

Mike

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2006\02\14@161022 by Sean Schouten

face picon face
On 2/13/06, Michael Rigby-Jones <EraseMEMichael.Rigby-JonesspamspamspamBeGonebookham.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> >{Original Message removed}

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