Searching \ for '[PIC] Simple Bug Tracking Software' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'Simple Bug Tracking Software'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[PIC] Simple Bug Tracking Software'
2005\06\16@113050 by Alex Parkinson

flavicon
face
Hey everyone,

Does anyone know of any simple programs (Windows) for tracking bugs, preferably
freeware/open-source?  There is a ton of bug-tracking software out there, but it all
seems to require you to set up a server, and is designed for large projects with
multiple team members.  I'm looking for something to keep track of the bugs in my PIC
projects, with only one programmer/tester, and I don't want to have to set up a server
or database, or anything like that.  Does anyone know of anyone good programs to suit my
needs?

Thanks,
Alex Parkinson

2005\06\16@114815 by Michael Rigby-Jones

picon face


{Quote hidden}

Bug tracking is really only of any use if it's part of a source control application, so you have an audit trail of what bugs have been addressed in what releases.  What source control do you currently use?  If you can move to CVS then try http://www.cvstrac.org/ .

Regards

Mike

=======================================================================
This e-mail is intended for the person it is addressed to only. The
information contained in it may be confidential and/or protected by
law. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, you must
not make any use of this information, or copy or show it to any
person. Please contact us immediately to tell us that you have
received this e-mail, and return the original to us. Any use,
forwarding, printing or copying of this message is strictly prohibited.
No part of this message can be considered a request for goods or
services.
=======================================================================

2005\06\16@115022 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>Does anyone know of any simple programs (Windows) for tracking bugs,
>preferably freeware/open-source?

Look for something called elog, it is a browser based logging system,
freeware AIUI. One of my colleagues has set it up on his machine here as we
are having to do away with paper in the clean rooms as we get more optics
assemblies around, and it seems to work quite well.

It "just" needs a web server set up on any machine, so should run on a
single machine happily. I haven't been involved in looking at report
generation or anything like that, so cannot comment on those sorts of
facilities.

Looks like it is here http://midas.psi.ch/elog/

2005\06\16@115900 by Alex Parkinson

flavicon
face
I'm currently using Subversion with the TortoiseSVN client-side interface, and I'd
rather not switch from that, since it seems to be working fine, and I'm in the middle of
a project.  Since I'm the only programmer on the project, I don't really need a
full-featured bug tracking system.  I really just need something to allow me to easily
enter new bug descriptions and keep track of whether the bugs are still live - mainly
just something to remind what bugs exist.

Alex

Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:
>
>>{Original Message removed}

2005\06\16@120258 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On 6/16/05, Alex Parkinson wrote:
> I'm looking for something to keep track of the bugs in my PIC
> projects, with only one programmer/tester, and I don't want to have to set up a server
> or database, or anything like that.  Does anyone know of anyone good programs to suit

If you don't want to set up a server, what about a text file that you
check in to your source control system?

Also, even though you don't want to set up a server, I'd suggest
Bugzilla (http://www.bugzilla.org), developed by the people at
Netscape. It's very good.

Alex

2005\06\16@120406 by alan smith

picon face
Single user....single project.....

Spreadsheet maybe?



               
---------------------------------
Discover Yahoo!
Stay in touch with email, IM, photo sharing & more. Check it out!

2005\06\16@150523 by Timothy J. Weber

face
flavicon
face
I had pretty much the same requirements a while ago.  I ended up using
something open-source called BugManager, by Clarisys.  I don't remember
what their distribution options were; I got the Delphi source and have
hacked it a fair amount since.

So I don't have an installer for either the original or my hacks, and I
don't remember if you can get a precompiled version...

But, FWIW, it's worked well for me as a solution for that same problem.

Alex Parkinson wrote:
> I'm currently using Subversion with the TortoiseSVN client-side
> interface, and I'd rather not switch from that, since it seems to be
> working fine, and I'm in the middle of a project.  Since I'm the only
> programmer on the project, I don't really need a full-featured bug
> tracking system.  I really just need something to allow me to easily
> enter new bug descriptions and keep track of whether the bugs are still
> live - mainly just something to remind what bugs exist.
--
Timothy J. Weber                 http://www.lightlink.com/tjweber
tjweberspamKILLspamlightlink.com

2005\06\16@151145 by John J. McDonough

flavicon
face

Alex Parkinson said:

> with only one programmer/tester, and I don't want to have to set up a
> server  or database, or anything like that.  Does anyone know of anyone
> good programs to suit my  needs?

Pretty much anything beyond Excel is going to require you to set up a
database, and most likely communicate with a web server.  Microsoft used
to have a thing called Personal Web Server, and I think it may have become
a part of XP, but I haven't pursued it. But most of these open source
things expect Perl or PHP plus MySQL.  Setting all that up on Windows
could be a pain, and I don't even know if it's possible with PWS.  IIS is
big bucks and while Apache can be set up on Windows, but it's pretty
alien, and might be easier on Linux.

Although I use XP for my client side stuff, I find it invaluable to have a
Linux box on the net with Apache and MySQL for just this kind of thing.

--McD



2005\06\16@155803 by Steven W

flavicon
face
Alex,

A "personal" version of IIS (Microsoft's web server) comes with XP "Pro"
(read: not the "Home" edition).

You can also download a copy of SQL Server Desktop from MS at:
www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=413744d1-a0bc-479f-
bafa-e4b278eb9147&displaylang=en. You could also just use something like MS
Access over ODBC. Regardless; setting up a SQL DB is pretty simple using
Enterprise Manager.

At that point you can pretty much develop in anything you want. If you want
to do ASP.NET there is a free RD IDE avail at: http://www.asp.net

Hope this helps,

Steve W

{Original Message removed}

2005\06\16@163546 by Steven W

flavicon
face
Alex,

Whoops... Missed your original post... I was just responding to what "McD"
said... Sorry... You're probably not too interested in setting those things
up for what you are doing.

Steve W

{Original Message removed}

2005\06\16@181512 by Jinx

face picon face
> I don't really need a full-featured bug tracking system.  I really just
> need something to allow me to easily enter new bug descriptions
> and keep track of whether the bugs are still live - mainly just something
> to remind what bugs exist

Notepad ?



2005\06\17@070037 by Walter Banks

picon face
We have cycled through a bunch of bug tracking software packages and data bases and came back to excell.
It works no special skills or set up.

w..


Alex Parkinson wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2005\06\17@131432 by Peter

picon face


On Thu, 16 Jun 2005, alan smith wrote:

> Single user....single project.....

rcs ?

Peter

2005\06\17@133415 by Ben Hencke

picon face
Mantis. Beats bugzilla hands down. Easy to use, fast, easy to manage.
I used it on a daily basis. Free & open source. For $100/yr the author
will host it for you. I have seen it used with customers where the
customer is given a login and can access downloads and read news
postings.

http://www.mantisbt.org/

- Ben


On 6/17/05, Peter <.....plpKILLspamspam.....actcom.co.il> wrote:
>
>
> On Thu, 16 Jun 2005, alan smith wrote:
>
> > Single user....single project.....
>
> rcs ?
>
> Peter
> -

2005\06\17@174856 by Alex Parkinson

flavicon
face
Thanks for the suggestions, everybody.  I'm really surprised to find that there aren't
any simple solutions dedicated to bug tracking.  Maybe writing one would make for a good
project to do on the side.  Of the suggestions provided, I may try just using a
spreadsheet, although I'm not sure if this will be any better than my current solution,
which is to use ToDoList ( http://www.codeproject.com/tools/ToDoList2.asp ).

Thanks again,
Alex

2005\06\18@021238 by Tony Smith

picon face
The only people who buy bug tracking software are large companies, individuals or small projects just use spreadsheets or similar.
That's why all bug tracking / help desk / etc systems are terrible. Called it enterprise and slap $100k pricetags on it.

One package that gets mentioned a lot is FogBugz, from http://www.fogcreek.com. Ive never seen it, it uses a web interface, so I'm
not sure of its practicality for personal use (unless you want to set up a server). I'm also unsure how much of the praise is due
fanboy adoration of its creator, Joel Spolsky. He writes a lot about software design, but after I downloaded his other product, a
web authoring tool called Citydesk, and I was distinctly underwhelmed.

Anyway, I just use Excel. If I (or my boss) wants a summary, I just use PivotTables to produce it.  eg, # of bugs grouped by date,
showing priority x project etc.

Tony


> {Original Message removed}

2005\06\18@062717 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Tony Smith wrote:

> The only people who buy bug tracking software are large companies,
> individuals or small projects just use spreadsheets or similar. That's
> why all bug tracking / help desk / etc systems are terrible. Called it
> enterprise and slap $100k pricetags on it.

I beg to differ... for example Mantis (PHP) and Bugzilla (Perl) are free
bugtracking tools that have quite a large user base among non-large
companies.

> it uses a web interface,

Most free bugtracking applications come from the open source world, and it
doesn't surprise me that they are web-based. After all, a bugtracking
application is usually about organizing teamwork (otherwise you can just
use Excel or Notepad, or ToDoList). Making a multi-user application /not/
web-based calls for a lot of complications that you don't need when you
write free software :)

> so I'm not sure of its practicality for personal use (unless you want to
> set up a server).

"Setting up a server" may not be that big of a deal. If you run any of the
major Linux distributions, it should be not too complicated to get a LAMP
(Linux, Apache, MySql, PHP/Perl) configuration working. If you run WinXP
Pro or Win2k Pro, a somewhat restricted version of IIS is part of the
system. Install PHP or Perl and MySql, and you have your server. (I think
there's even an "AMP" installer for Windows that installs Apache, PHP and
MySql in one swoop.) Of course it's a bit of work, definitely more than
just calling setup.exe and finding the right icon in the Start menu, but
for example Mantis can very well run on your notebook like any other
desktop application.


However, I think the lack of specific desktop applications is due to the
fact that something like Excel works well enough for a single user, and
anything teamwork needs a multi-user application anyway -- and this would
usually be server-client, mostly web-based. (And there's no lack of these.)
And a single user who wants it more organized than Excel can always
organize his spreadsheet better or install one of the web-based apps...

FWIW, I'm using Mantis for small teams and client communication. Excel is
not good for getting bug reports from clients.

Gerhard

2005\06\19@012320 by Tony Smith

picon face
You misread what I said... you can't answer a comment about large companies buying bad over-priced software by referring to
non-large companies installing OS software.  It's 2 different markets, and anyway, the original poster is neither.

Your answer highlights the problem.

The original poster wanted something simple for a one man shop, preferably  something off-the-shelf.  It probably doesn't exist.
The guy wants a rowboat, not the QEII.  You even said as much yourself.  "Setting up a server" is just not that simple, even if the
software (Mantis etc) is free.  In my view simple means you come over here, set it up for me, upgrade and install patches when
needed, and make me a cup of coffee while you're at it.  Taking the dog for a walk is optional.  I've 2 boxes here that will become
servers one day (one for web testing, one for media), and y'know, I just couldn't be bothered.

And besides, nothing is good for getting bug reports from clients!

Tony



> {Original Message removed}

2005\06\19@101516 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Tony Smith wrote:

> You misread what I said...

Maybe... I was replying to this (pretty unambiguous) phrase of yours: "The
only people who buy bug tracking software are large companies, individuals
or small projects just use spreadsheets or similar" -- and not so much to
the OP.

I've worked in and with a lot of small companies, and some had commercial
bug tracking systems, some had open source bug tracking systems, some had
none at all. All of them that had some organized system in place used a
client-server application (these pretty much all have a web interface, some
of the commercial apps also have a custom client application).

For me as an individual and for the small companies I worked with, what you
said is just not true. Maybe our background is different (I work more with
software than with hardware, and I mostly work in distributed teams), but
certainly our experiences WRT bug tracking seem to be different. So --
don't speak for me or for the companies I got to know when saying that we
use spreadsheets or similar. We don't.


> "Setting up a server" is just not that simple, even if the software
> (Mantis etc) is free.  

It may not be; I guess I mentioned that.

OTOH, have you ever tried to install XAMPP
http://www.apachefriends.org/en/xampp.html? It might just be that "setting
up a "server" is not that much more complicated than installing Excel. (I
haven't tried XAMPP, but it looks quite solid.)


And OTOH, the boundaries between desktop and client-server apps are getting
blurred. For example the General Motors CD collection with their
maintenance manuals installs -- as a desktop application for accessing the
manuals -- a database server (Transbase) and a web server (Tomcat). That's
not necessarily a practice I find a good thing, but it shows that the
boundaries between desktop apps and client-server apps are becoming less
clear. (After installing the application to access their CDs you have both
services running /all the time/ on your system. It's possible to change
their configuration so that they don't run normally and write a batch that
starts them before you access the CDs, but of course you need to know a bit
more about system configuration for that than the average garage owner
knows :)


> In my view simple means you come over here, set it up for me, upgrade and
> install patches when needed, and make me a cup of coffee while you're at
> it.  

I wouldn't do that even if it were about Excel if you didn't pay me -- or
at least asked me nicely :)

Gerhard

2005\06\19@170227 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
On Jun 19, 2005, at 7:15 AM, Gerhard Fiedler wrote:

> I've worked in and with a lot of small companies, and some had
> commercial
> bug tracking systems

cisco has used "ddts" (Distributed Defect Tracking System, I think;
currently
from IBM, or maybe it's become clearDDTS from somewhere else) since
about 1990,
when we were, if not a SMALL company, at least not very large, either.  
While
it is currently being replaced, DDTS has scaled better than any other
software
tool we've bought (not all by itself, but including internal and vendor
efforts
to update it for web access, and so on.)

I wouldn't hesitate to install a "personal" version of ddts, if there
were
such a thing, and I'd be likely to make any semi-homebrew bug tracking
system
look a lot like the way ddts has looked...

BillW

2005\06\19@232157 by PicDude

flavicon
face
I use a simple text file (I still use "vi" on a command-line based linux
system for my pic dev) will a list of TO-DO's.  Three categories in there
"BUGS", "TO-DO's", and "OPTIONS".  I've seen very large companies run very
very large software projects using a spreadsheet for bug tracking.  As much
as I opposed it, and eventually got a proper multi-user system in place, with
a careful process to control it, it did serve the purpose for some time.

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Friday 17 June 2005 04:48 pm, Alex Parkinson scribbled:
{Quote hidden}

2005\06\20@105139 by Tony Smith

picon face
I guess we have different experiences, and probably a different definition of what a small company is.  By small, I mean 4 or 5
people, not necessarily technical.  If they were, they wouldn't need me  :-).

Nearly all software companies I've worked for have some sort of tracking system, usually horrible 'help desk' type stuff, or a front
end to RCS/CVS etc.

I often work for large companies, and often I'm the sole developer, so there is no system in place (I always ask).  I have to make
my own as I can't install anything.  Trying asking a large bank to install server software!  Bad enough getting a decent text
editor.  I've been known to use the Visual Studio ToDo list thingy, or the Outlook task thingy.

Tony



> {Original Message removed}

2005\06\20@194049 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
Tony Smith wrote:

> I guess we have different experiences, and probably a different
> definition of what a small company is.  By small, I mean 4 or 5 people,
> not necessarily technical.  If they were, they wouldn't need me  :-).

That's included in my range of "small" -- for me that starts at 1 and goes
up to some 30 or so, depending on what they are and what they make :)

But yes, I'm one, and I have my web based tracking system. For anything
that requires regular interaction with the customer or with sub-contractors
that's pretty handy. Didn't take long to install, and since it runs with
the software that most low-cost web hosting companies provide anyway, it's
not expensive either to have it hosted.

> Trying asking a large bank to install server software!  

Probably better not... :)  But that's where your own could come handy.

> I've been known to use the Visual Studio ToDo list thingy, or the Outlook
> task thingy.

I find Outlook tasks "heavy-weight" to use. You almost need an Exchange
Server if you want to use them for collaboration, but if the client has one
and their people are used to use it efficiently, this can work. OTOH, if
they are used to use Exchange Server/Outlook efficiently, they are probably
to some degree computer-literate and might also be easily coerced to use
your own web-based tracking system... :)

Gerhard

2005\06\23@025041 by Ben Hencke

picon face
FWIW, I have use XAMPP and it works just fine. It even comes with a
neat web based phpmyadmin tool so editing the database is as easy.
Maybe not excell easy, but easier that Access. (IMHO)

- Ben

On 6/19/05, Gerhard Fiedler <EraseMElistsspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTconnectionbrazil.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2005 , 2006 only
- Today
- New search...