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'[PIC] Remote network sensors'
2008\07\22@220135 by Jinx

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> > "PIC with an Ethernet interface and assignable IP address

> Quickest way to build/program something like this would probably
> be a serial to ethernet module like an Lantronix X-Port coupled
> serially to PIC micro doing the sensor interfacing

Thanks. Similar function the Vinculum then

www.lantronix.com/device-networking/embedded-device-servers/xport.htm
l

Is there a NZ distributor ? I'm getting only Aussies from Lantronix's
"Where To Buy"

Approx price for an X-Port ?

2008\07\22@221010 by David Duffy (AVD)

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Jinx wrote:
{Quote hidden}

About AU $70 + GST from Soanar Plus. http://www.soanar.com

David...

--
___________________________________________
David Duffy        Audio Visual Devices P/L
Unit 8, 10 Hook St, Capalaba 4157 Australia
Ph: +61 7 38235717      Fax: +61 7 38234717
Our Web Site: http://www.audiovisualdevices.com.au
___________________________________________

2008\07\22@221939 by Richard Prosser

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Jinx,

We use lantronix bits for testing but I can't find anyone who knows of
an NZ distributor.

OZ or Hong Kong may be your best bet.

Richard P

2008/7/23 Jinx <spam_OUTjoecolquittTakeThisOuTspamclear.net.nz>:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\07\22@224522 by Brent Brown

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On 23 Jul 2008 at 13:59, Jinx wrote:

> > > "PIC with an Ethernet interface and assignable IP address
>
> > Quickest way to build/program something like this would probably
> > be a serial to ethernet module like an Lantronix X-Port coupled
> > serially to PIC micro doing the sensor interfacing
>
> Thanks. Similar function the Vinculum then
>
> www.lantronix.com/device-networking/embedded-device-servers/xport.htm
> l
>
> Is there a NZ distributor ? I'm getting only Aussies from Lantronix's
> "Where To Buy"
>
> Approx price for an X-Port ?

Actually there is a NZ distributor for Lantronix...

http://www.masspar.co.nz/
.....paulKILLspamspam@spam@masspar.co.nz
Paul Grainger
MASSPAR
Box 36-512
Merivale
Christchurch 8146
New Zealand
Phone +64 3 355 0602
Fax +64 3 355 0603
Mobile 0274 542 632

Yeah, also as suggested Soanar Plus http://www.soanarplus.com has them for NZ$82
1up, also the XPort Direct module for about $10 cheaper (not sure what the
differences are).

I do have some second hand XPort eval boards I probably need to get rid of, board
with XPort module, level shifting, RS232 connector, cables, 5V power supply, etc.
Let me know if one or more of these might be usefull to you, paid $200ea, sell
$100ea?

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  brent.brownspamKILLspamclear.net.nz


2008\07\22@231747 by Jinx

face picon face
> Actually there is a NZ distributor for Lantronix...
> snip

Thanks

Asked the enquirer for more details - budget, time-frame, more
info on environment etc

Will get back to this as and when


2008\07\23@053738 by Jinx

face picon face
> It may be worth using something like the Lantronix module to build
> a one-off, but work on using the Microchip ENC28J60 Ethernet
> Interface chip with a PIC as the production hardware. Would mean
> writing a dose of code for the interface, but may well be worth it for
> quantity production.
>
> Microchip has a TCP/IP stack that goes with this chip, I believe, so
> getting something coded for production may not be that big a step

After speaking with my enquirer I came to just that conclusion

His requirement is for these little fellas to be fully in the network, and
will need a TCP/IP stack. That rules out the 10F Wouter

Immediate quantity would be about a dozen for one infrastructure,
hard-wired, after that could be 300-400 using Wi-Fi


2008\07\23@055401 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Wed, Jul 23, 2008 at 5:15 PM, Jinx <.....joecolquittKILLspamspam.....clear.net.nz> wrote:
>> It may be worth using something like the Lantronix module to build
>> a one-off, but work on using the Microchip ENC28J60 Ethernet
>> Interface chip with a PIC as the production hardware. Would mean
>> writing a dose of code for the interface, but may well be worth it for
>> quantity production.
>>
>> Microchip has a TCP/IP stack that goes with this chip, I believe, so
>> getting something coded for production may not be that big a step
>
> After speaking with my enquirer I came to just that conclusion
>
> His requirement is for these little fellas to be fully in the network, and
> will need a TCP/IP stack. That rules out the 10F Wouter
>
> Immediate quantity would be about a dozen for one infrastructure,
> hard-wired, after that could be 300-400 using Wi-Fi

I believe the ENC28J60 works nicely with this application.
I am playing with Exploer 16 demo board (with PIC32) and
the Ethernet PICTail+ board (with ENC28J60). The default demo
code is more than what you want. Or you can use PIC18J
with integrated Ethernet: PIC18F97J60 family is what
you want.

Microchip TCPIP Stack and development tools:
http://www.microchip.com/tcpip

Xiaofan

2008\07\23@062546 by Jinx

face picon face
> I believe the ENC28J60 works nicely with this application.
> I am playing with Explorer 16 demo board (with PIC32) and
> the Ethernet PICTail+ board (with ENC28J60). The default
> demo code is more than what you want. Or you can use PIC18J
> with integrated Ethernet: PIC18F97J60 family is what
> you want.

Thanks. I'd just looked up those development kits

http://www.microchipdirect.com/productsearch.aspx?Keywords=ENC28J60

and downloaded the TCP/IP stack

Microchip's site isn't working well for me at the moment, I want
to get into the forum too, but that'll keep for a little while, until I
read through some documentation anyway

2008\07\23@062716 by Dan Smith

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2008/7/23 Jinx <EraseMEjoecolquittspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTclear.net.nz>:
> Immediate quantity would be about a dozen for one infrastructure,
> hard-wired, after that could be 300-400 using Wi-Fi

I'm just starting on a WiFi project at the moment - I'm considering
the WiPort <http://www.lantronix.com/device-networking/embedded-device-servers/wiport.html>

Looks pretty handy.

Dan

2008\07\23@072326 by Forrest Christian

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face
I'll help out a bit as well...

http://www.olimex.com/dev/pic-micro-web.html
http://www.olimex.com/dev/pic-mini-web.html
http://www.olimex.com/dev/pic-web.html
http://www.olimex.com/dev/pic-maxi-web.html
http://www.edtp.com/
http://www.mikroe.com/en/tools/lv18fj/
http://www.mikroe.com/en/tools/picplc16b/
http://www.ezweblynx.com/
www.ccsinfo.com/product_info.php?products_id=proethkit
http://www.ccsinfo.com/product_info.php?cPath=Store&products_id=embethkit

That should keep you busy for a while...

-forrest

2008\07\23@080309 by Jinx

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> I'll help out a bit as well...

..... numerous useful links later ....

Thanks Forrest, I mean to drop you a line. Got side-tracked earlier

2008\07\23@110059 by Ruben Jönsson

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Another option would be to use several ZigBee modules with an ethernet gateway.

<http://www.rfm.com/products/zigbee.shtml>

The ethernet gateway can assign IP or port addresses to ZigBee end devices.

/Ruben



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> -

2008\07\23@162919 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Jul 23, 2008, at 2:15 AM, Jinx wrote:

> Immediate quantity would be about a dozen for one infrastructure,
> hard-wired, after that could be 300-400 using Wi-Fi

The need for both would push ME strongly toward things like the
lantronix X-port units, which have pin-compatible hardwired and
wireless units.  (lantronix isn't the only one with such units,
of course.)

Building a wireless ethernet device FROM SCRATCH would be scary.
(This is why there are so many wireless connectivity options
that are supposed to be SIMPLER than 802.11)

Once you've paid for a wireless ethernet interface of any kind
anyway, the PIC part of your sensor is going to be a minor cost
add-on...

BillW

2008\07\23@195930 by Jinx

face picon face
> > Immediate quantity would be about a dozen for one infrastructure,
> > hard-wired, after that could be 300-400 using Wi-Fi
>
> The need for both would push ME strongly toward things like the
> lantronix X-port units, which have pin-compatible hardwired and
> wireless units.  (lantronix isn't the only one with such units,
> of course.)

Networking is not in my comfort zone and I don't have the competence
to evaluate all the suggestions put forward. My potential client is very
experienced with all forms of networking and internet access so I'll let
him take a look. His immediate preference is TCP/IP in as simple and
low-cost a form as possible

Low-cost doesn't always mean cost-effective of course. I'm reluctant
to spend a lot of development time for just a dozen units, although my
time would probably be reasonably compensated for (it's for a govt
department, which may or may not mean anything $$$-wise). The big
deal is if the 300+ market could be opened up. I know that particular
end-user would find Wi-Fi units very helpful indeed

2008\07\24@174500 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On Wed, Jul 23, 2008 at 4:57 PM, Jinx <joecolquittspamspam_OUTclear.net.nz> wrote:
>
> Low-cost doesn't always mean cost-effective of course. I'm reluctant
> to spend a lot of development time for just a dozen units, although my
> time would probably be reasonably compensated for (it's for a govt
> department, which may or may not mean anything $$$-wise). The big
> deal is if the 300+ market could be opened up. I know that particular
> end-user would find Wi-Fi units very helpful indeed

Hmm... Lantronix WiPorts are $119 each.  You can get a Linksys WRT54GL
(Linux version), and solder on a 2x?? (10 I think) header to give you
2 serial ports.  Kernel modules are available for GPIO bit banging, to
access SD cards via SPI, etc.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833124190

Probably doesn't work for a finished product, but might do the trick
for a prototype.

2008\07\24@175457 by Marcel Duchamp

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Alex Harford wrote:

> Hmm... Lantronix WiPorts are $119 each.  You can get a Linksys WRT54GL
> (Linux version), and solder on a 2x?? (10 I think) header to give you
> 2 serial ports.  Kernel modules are available for GPIO bit banging, to
> access SD cards via SPI, etc.
>
> www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833124190
>
> Probably doesn't work for a finished product, but might do the trick
> for a prototype.


...or maybe get this one at $29.95:

www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?qs=ZvDUiWN9X0296qs4drWfQQ%3d%3d

2008\07\24@181828 by Marcel Duchamp

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Marcel Duchamp wrote:
> Alex Harford wrote:
>

uh, never mind! Just noticed Alex specified "WiPorts" which the part
below is not. Doh.




>
> ...or maybe get this one at $29.95:
>
> http://www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?qs=ZvDUiWN9X0296qs4drWfQQ%3d%3d

2008\07\24@181936 by Jinx

face picon face
> ...or maybe get this one at $29.95:

http://www.lantronix.com/pdf/XPort-Direct_PB.pdf

Worth some very serious consideration indeed

2008\07\24@183042 by Alex Harford

face picon face
On Thu, Jul 24, 2008 at 2:53 PM, Marcel Duchamp
<@spam@marcel.duchampKILLspamspamsbcglobal.net> wrote:
> Alex Harford wrote:
>
>> Hmm... Lantronix WiPorts are $119 each.  You can get a Linksys WRT54GL
>> (Linux version), and solder on a 2x?? (10 I think) header to give you
>> 2 serial ports.  Kernel modules are available for GPIO bit banging, to
>> access SD cards via SPI, etc.
>>
>> www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833124190
>>
>> Probably doesn't work for a finished product, but might do the trick
>> for a prototype.
>
>
> ...or maybe get this one at $29.95:
>
> http://www.mouser.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?qs=ZvDUiWN9X0296qs4drWfQQ%3d%3d

Is it just me, or is that miscategorized?  Specs page here:
http://www.lantronix.com/device-networking/embedded-device-servers/xport-direct.html

says that part # is for Ethernet only, not WiFi.

2008\07\24@184424 by Jinx

face picon face
> says that part # is for Ethernet only, not WiFi.

Comparitive NZ prices for many Lantronix products

http://www.masspar.co.nz/EmBed_Feb_08.pdf#zoom=100

2008\07\24@190928 by Luis Antonio Prata Barbosa n/a

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Hi,

One more:

Silabs... CP2201-EK   (30USD$)

Digikey:  336-1316-ND

Luis A P Barbosa

2008/7/22 Jinx <KILLspamjoecolquittKILLspamspamclear.net.nz>:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\07\24@192134 by Jinx

face picon face
> Silabs... CP2201-EK   (30USD$)

Thanks

2008\07\24@200422 by Jinx

face picon face
My client has by some means got a module from

http://www.sena.com/

Initially he baulked at OTS modules but he's come around to my
thinking that at this stage it makes economic sense not to get bogged
down in Ethernet PIC development, but rather concentrate on the
sensor PIC functionality

2008\07\25@002428 by Vitaliy

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face
Marcel Duchamp wrote:
> uh, never mind! Just noticed Alex specified "WiPorts" which the part
> below is not. Doh.

Marcel, I'm glad you made the mistake. I have a feeling that the module you
recommended will find its way into one of our products. So, thanks! :-)

Vitaliy

2008\07\25@012733 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Jul 24, 2008, at 2:44 PM, Alex Harford wrote:

> Lantronix WiPorts are $119 each.  You can get a Linksys WRT54GL

Hmm.   Or any of the other wireless router platforms that has enough  
info out there to run DDWRT or similar, many way cheaper than the  
WRT54GL.  (hackability at the HW level is likely to be variable,  
though.  One of these days a clever HW verndor will stick some  
x2.54mm headers on the unused pins to target the (small but vocal)  
hacker market.)  How ... sad.

It's also sad that something like the lantronix WIPort contains an  
x86 class machine with significant memory, enough so that putting a  
PIC on the side is ... almost silly.
You could consider using something like a Rabbitcore (
http://www.rabbit.com/products/CoreModules/index.shtml) where at least you  
get to USE the same CPU that runs the tcp stack.  (less than $50 for  
ethernet, less than $100 for 802.11.  Also a zigebee version.)

You might also want to look at things like PDAs with wireless network  
connectivity.  Some of those have significant free development  
environments, substantial power, and sometimes useful economies of  
scale...

BillW

2008\07\25@021217 by Vitaliy

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William "Chops" Westfield wrote:
>> Lantronix WiPorts are $119 each.  You can get a Linksys WRT54GL
>
> Hmm.   Or any of the other wireless router platforms that has enough
> info out there to run DDWRT or similar, many way cheaper than the
> WRT54GL.  (hackability at the HW level is likely to be variable,
> though.  One of these days a clever HW verndor will stick some
> x2.54mm headers on the unused pins to target the (small but vocal)
> hacker market.)  How ... sad.

If dimensions are not a concern, it should be possible to use an
off-the-shelf $20 wireless router connected to a UART/Ethernet module
without hacking anything. Might be a good hack for some quick-and-dirty
one-off applications.

Vitaliy

2008\07\27@220028 by Jinx

face picon face
www.microelemente.ro/

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