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'[PIC] Remote netowrk sensors'
2008\07\22@194849 by Jinx

face picon face
I've been asked to quote on several -

================
"PIC with an Ethernet interface and assignable IP address that runs
either a small web interface that when called will report the voltage
of a battery and the status of a switch. Ideally if it's possible to insert
some form of SNMP instead of a web interface but the main thing
is to be able to connect to the remote device and find out what the
voltage level is.

Also as an alternative and depending how difficult it is.

Same as above with at least 1 analogue input and 4 digital I/O"
================

The PIC part, easy as. The comms part though .....

What questions should I be asking ? The person who asked is right
into Wi-Fi, but whether that's the medium, I don't know yet

Is it possible to have a minimalist network interface (bit-bang ?) for
such a seemingly simple task ? I would most likely use an 18F1220,
up to 40MHz if required. 50MIPs Scenix is an option too

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simple_Network_Management_Protocol

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet

2008\07\22@214559 by Brent Brown

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On 23 Jul 2008 at 11:46, Jinx wrote:
> I've been asked to quote on several -
>
> ================
> "PIC with an Ethernet interface and assignable IP address that runs
> either a small web interface that when called will report the voltage
> of a battery and the status of a switch. Ideally if it's possible to insert
> some form of SNMP instead of a web interface but the main thing
> is to be able to connect to the remote device and find out what the
> voltage level is.

Quickest way to build/program something like this would probably be a serial to
ethernet module like an Lantronix X-Port coupled serially to PIC micro doing the
sensor interfacing. Various protocols over ethernet are then available (virtual COM
port is easiest), even custom web page server. Not the cheapest option per unit, but
saves a heap of development time and cost (if you haven't done ethernet stuff
before you can leverage off).

--
Brent Brown, Electronic Design Solutions
16 English Street, St Andrews,
Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
Ph: +64 7 849 0069
Fax: +64 7 849 0071
Cell: +64 27 433 4069
eMail:  spam_OUTbrent.brownTakeThisOuTspamclear.net.nz


2008\07\22@231200 by cdb

flavicon
face


:: PIC with an Ethernet interface and assignable IP address that runs
:: either a small web interface that when called will report the
:: voltage
:: of a battery and the status of a switch. Ideally if it's possible
:: to insert
:: some form of SNMP instead of a web interface but the main thing
:: is to be able to connect to the remote device and find out what the
:: voltage level is.

There was someone who produced an item called a Webbrick that would do
what you want, which used a Pic - I have the code as I was helping
them with a compiler problem. I believe he sold the rights to another
company, which I think now trades as Webbrick Systems, I'd have to
research to find out.

Andy Harris is the man's name and at the time he traded as Extend
Technologies.

Colin
--
cdb, .....colinKILLspamspam@spam@btech-online.co.uk on 23/07/2008

Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk  

Hosted by:  http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=7988359







2008\07\22@232247 by Jinx

face picon face
> There was someone who produced an item called a Webbrick

Thanks. Still a bit short on technical details from the enquirer, who
knows networking a lot better than he knows PICs. He did say
that his customers/users "are going to need quite a few of them"
so I'll have to look at this a bit more in depth than for a one-off. Maybe
the Lantronix, maybe the Webbrick, have to see how it pans out

2008\07\23@022451 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I've been asked to quote on several -

Unless several means many many the requirement for a PIC is stupid.
Ethernet is not trivial, and SNMP certainly not. Turn it around, find a
suitable library first, then find matching hardware.

Bit-banging Ethenet is not impossible, but requires hardware drivers. I
would not choose that route, unless you choose a suitable FPGA instead
of a PIC.

And get the specs accurate. PIC means 10F200 or PIC32? Ethernet means
what exactly?

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2008\07\23@031517 by Forrest W Christian

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face
That pretty much describes my current working project which is just a
month or so from completion (assuming that the schedule doesn't slip
even further - it's been one of those projects)

If you'd rather not deal with this, shoot me an email off-list and I'll
discuss specifics with you.

-forrest

Jinx wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2008\07\23@043429 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>Thanks. Still a bit short on technical details from the enquirer,
>who knows networking a lot better than he knows PICs. He did say
>that his customers/users "are going to need quite a few of them"
>so I'll have to look at this a bit more in depth than for a one-off.
>Maybe the Lantronix, maybe the Webbrick, have to see how it pans out

It may be worth using something like the Lantronix module to build a
one-off, but work on using the Microchip ENC28J60 Ethernet Interface chip
with a PIC as the production hardware. Would mean writing a dose of code for
the interface, but may well be worth it for quantity production.

Microchip has a TCP/IP stack that goes with this chip, I believe, so getting
something coded for production may not be that big a step.

2008\07\24@023655 by Justin Richards

face picon face
I really wanted to do just this as I thought it would be an
interesting project.  Sensors/Controllers all over the house detecting
and controlling all sorts of device from anywhere I could get internet
access.

Discovered that the PICs that have an inbuilt Ethernet encoder seem to
all be those new fangdangled surface mount devices that excluded the
use of a cheap of the shelf prototype board.

I considered making boards or finding pcb's that will support the
chips but the effort becomes prohibitive for my hobby interests
especially compared with the cheap and flexible prototyping boards I
have enjoyed using.

Justin


On Wed, Jul 23, 2008 at 4:34 PM, Alan B. Pearce <A.B.PearcespamKILLspamrl.ac.uk> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2008\07\27@184741 by Andrew Burchill

picon face
On Thu, Jul 24, 2008 at 4:36 PM, Justin Richards
<.....justin.richardsKILLspamspam.....gmail.com>wrote:
>
> Discovered that the PICs that have an inbuilt Ethernet encoder seem to
> all be those new fangdangled surface mount devices that excluded the
> use of a cheap of the shelf prototype board.
>

Greetings,
for my purposes in using SMD PIC's, I have used the OnePass boards from
http://www.onepasinc.com/ he has a range of boards that suit my hobby
purposes and make using SMD a breeze. IMHO they are also quite within
the price range suited to the hobbyist, that includes shipping them to me
in Australia. A couple of the boards are perfectly suited for using in
conjunction with the Pickit2 device, as they have a six pin header position.
In particular look for OP290B in Superboards.

regards
Andrew Burchill*
*

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