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'[PIC] Pogo pins ICSP'
2008\02\11@185549 by msi1259

picon face
I've searched the archives on doing ICSP using pogo pins, and am now
unclearer on exactly how it is done. Are through-holes used to land the
pins on the preferred method?   Is a pc board made up to match the holes
(or chip pins) to hold the pogo pins? What holds the assembly down
during programming?  Are adapters (i.e. ICSP to pogo pin for SOIC / thin
DIP chips) available somewhere? TIA!

2008\02\11@191958 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
msi1259 wrote:
> I've searched the archives on doing ICSP using pogo pins, and am now
> unclearer on exactly how it is done. Are through-holes used to land the
> pins on the preferred method?   Is a pc board made up to match the holes
> (or chip pins) to hold the pogo pins? What holds the assembly down
> during programming?  Are adapters (i.e. ICSP to pogo pin for SOIC / thin
> DIP chips) available somewhere? TIA!
>  
We are using this technique without a problem.

Our pogo pins are on 0.100" ctrs. We have created a pogo pin "holder" by
mounting the  pogo pin
receptacles on a 0.100" ctr 5-pin connector.  We then grab the  
connector  like it was a  pencil., and
probe onto the PCB.

The "target" on the PCB is a pad of 75mils with a 28mil hole. These pads
have a HASL finish, but
a gold finish would work just as well.

We use a wedge-shaped probe head, usually called a "chisel".  When the
pogo array is "probed " into
the  5 holes,  a reasonably good connection is made when the chisel
point  enters each hole., with the chisel
forming several high-pressure contacts around the edge of the hole.

Another way of doing this  is to use sharp "needle point" probes against
a flat pad (no hole). That works
fine for a short while until the needle point wears down. After that you
will obtain a poor connection, and it will
be intermittent.


This works very well, and it is not expensive.

--Bob

2008\02\11@203157 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 06:55 PM 2/11/2008, you wrote:
>I've searched the archives on doing ICSP using pogo pins, and am now
>unclearer on exactly how it is done. Are through-holes used to land the
>pins on the preferred method?   Is a pc board made up to match the holes
>(or chip pins) to hold the pogo pins? What holds the assembly down
>during programming?  Are adapters (i.e. ICSP to pogo pin for SOIC / thin
>DIP chips) available somewhere? TIA!

Usually a custom or semi-custom fixture holds the board relative to the pins,
which are mounted in a plastic plate, and typically have wires going
to a connector.

You can use either holes or circles on the PCB to mate with the pins..
you'd use different designs of pins depending on how you want to do it.

Eg: www.ectinfo.com/files/resource/Technical/dft_guidelinse_revf.pdf
    http://www.testfixtures.com/testfixtures/750.html

For smallish quantities, a header is cheaper.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
spam_OUTspeffTakeThisOuTspaminterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com



2008\02\11@204608 by Cedric Chang

flavicon
face
And where do you get pogo pins ?
Thanks
Cedric


On Feb 11, 2008, at 5:19 PM, Bob Axtell wrote:

msi1259 wrote:
> I've searched the archives on doing ICSP using pogo pins, and am now
> unclearer on exactly how it is done. Are through-holes used to land  
> the
> pins on the preferred method?   Is a pc board made up to match the  
> holes
> (or chip pins) to hold the pogo pins? What holds the assembly down
> during programming?  Are adapters (i.e. ICSP to pogo pin for SOIC /  
> thin
> DIP chips) available somewhere? TIA!
>
We are using this technique without a problem.

Our pogo pins are on 0.100" ctrs. We have created a pogo pin "holder" by
mounting the  pogo pin
receptacles on a 0.100" ctr 5-pin connector.  We then grab the
connector  like it was a  pencil., and
probe onto the PCB.

The "target" on the PCB is a pad of 75mils with a 28mil hole. These pads
have a HASL finish, but
a gold finish would work just as well.

We use a wedge-shaped probe head, usually called a "chisel".  When the
pogo array is "probed " into
the  5 holes,  a reasonably good connection is made when the chisel
point  enters each hole., with the chisel
forming several high-pressure contacts around the edge of the hole.

Another way of doing this  is to use sharp "needle point" probes against
a flat pad (no hole). That works
fine for a short while until the needle point wears down. After that you
will obtain a poor connection, and it will
be intermittent.


This works very well, and it is not expensive.

--Bob

2008\02\12@035649 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>And where do you get pogo pins ?

Farnell. Pogo pins are available from Harwin in the UK, through Farnell.
Search for "Harwin probe" on the farnell website, and there is a whole
variety pith pointed, concave, or serrated ends.


2008\02\12@042622 by Jan-Erik Soderholm

face picon face
Or eBay.

Alan B. Pearce wrote:
>> And where do you get pogo pins ?
>
> Farnell. Pogo pins are available from Harwin in the UK, through Farnell.
> Search for "Harwin probe" on the farnell website, and there is a whole
> variety pith pointed, concave, or serrated ends.
>
>

2008\02\12@092652 by Joe Bento

face
flavicon
face
They are also available through Newark here in the USA.  Farnell owns
Newark, and Newark seems to be the US extension of the Farnell website.

Joe



Alan B. Pearce wrote:
>> And where do you get pogo pins ?
>>    
>
> Farnell. Pogo pins are available from Harwin in the UK, through Farnell.
> Search for "Harwin probe" on the farnell website, and there is a whole
> variety pith pointed, concave, or serrated ends.
>
>
>  

2008\02\12@094353 by PAUL James

picon face

All,

Try "QA Technology" for pogo pins.  We use them in our test fixtures.
They have a wide variety of pins, receptacles, pin patterns, etc.  

They have excellent quailty products, and very reliable.   And if you
only need a few, they will send you samples free of charge.


       
Regards,

       
Jim

{Original Message removed}

2008\02\12@110923 by Phillip Coiner

picon face
Hi all
www.idinet.com/choosecountry.aspx?url=%2findex.aspx%3f
I use these guys (IDI) for RF pogo pins mostly but they have the smaller
digital signal/high density ones too.

Best Regards,

Phillip Coiner, Chief Technology Officer
GPS Source, Inc.
64 N. Mission Drive

Pueblo West, Co 81007
Phone: 719.510.4552
E-mail: .....pcoinerKILLspamspam@spam@gpssource.com

cid:image001.jpgspamKILLspam01C76FB5.FC0AD300
Your source for quality GNSS Networking Solutions and Design Services


{Original Message removed}

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