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'[PIC] PICs with 'K' or 'J' in the part number'
2012\05\05@232108 by Marcel Duchamp

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I'm sure that I am missing something hidden in plain sight but still have not broken the da Vinci code for PIC names yet.

Can someone here tell me exactly what the significance is of pics with either K or J in the part number?  How do these vary from pics without the K or J?

Thanks

2012\05\06@000503 by Chetan Bhargava

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I like their new naming convention which tells the family
(PIC24/dsPIC), performance level (FJ, H, EP), flash size, package
pins, etc but couldn't decode it completely.

Experts that have attended "Masters Conference" should be able to chime in.

-Chetan

On Sat, May 5, 2012 at 8:21 PM, Marcel Duchamp
<spam_OUTmarcel.duchampTakeThisOuTspamsbcglobal.net> wrote:
> I'm sure that I am missing something hidden in plain sight but still
> have not broken the da Vinci code for PIC names yet.
>
> Can someone here tell me exactly what the significance is of pics with
> either K or J in the part number?  How do these vary from pics without
> the K or J?
>
> Thanks!
>

2012\05\06@223337 by Matt Bennett

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On Sat, May 5, 2012 10:21 pm, Marcel Duchamp wrote:
> I'm sure that I am missing something hidden in plain sight but still
> have not broken the da Vinci code for PIC names yet.
>
> Can someone here tell me exactly what the significance is of pics with
> either K or J in the part number?  How do these vary from pics without
> the K or J?

It has mostly to do with the Silicon process. The PIC18s and PIC24s, and
dsPIC33s with a J are 3.3V parts. The Ks  are  a newer process that is a
mix of low power, lower voltage cores and higher voltage I/O. There are a
mess of different io structures, so you need to read the data sheets. In
general, a J will be cheaper than a non J, and a K will be even cheaper.



Matt Bennett
Just outside of Austin, TX
30.51,-97.91

The views I express are my own, not that of my employer, a large
multinational corporation that you are familiar with

2012\05\07@000904 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 10:33 AM, Matt Bennett <.....mattpiclistKILLspamspam@spam@hazmat.com> wrote:
> On Sat, May 5, 2012 10:21 pm, Marcel Duchamp wrote:
>> I'm sure that I am missing something hidden in plain sight but still
>> have not broken the da Vinci code for PIC names yet.
>>
>> Can someone here tell me exactly what the significance is of pics with
>> either K or J in the part number?  How do these vary from pics without
>> the K or J?
>
> It has mostly to do with the Silicon process. The PIC18s and PIC24s, and
> dsPIC33s with a J are 3.3V parts. The Ks  are  a newer process that is a
> mix of low power, lower voltage cores and higher voltage I/O. There are a
> mess of different io structures, so you need to read the data sheets. In
> general, a J will be cheaper than a non J, and a K will be even cheaper.
>

It seems that there are two types of K, one is 3.3V and the other is
5V, The 5V parts are more expensive than the 3.3V parts. Are they
from the same fab?


-- Xiaofan

2012\05\07@030954 by Matt Bennett

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On Sun, May 6, 2012 11:09 pm, Xiaofan Chen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I believe so, the 5V parts have some extra silicon to allow the low
voltage core for low power, but still maintain the higher voltage io ring.
More silicon or more testing leads to higher prices.



Matt Bennett
Just outside of Austin, TX
30.51,-97.91

The views I express are my own, not that of my employer, a large
multinational corporation that you are familiar with

2012\05\07@040830 by Electron

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Also, IIRC the "H" parts are faster than others.

Cheers,
Mario

2012\05\07@080945 by Vicent Colomar Prats
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And the new "EP" is for Enhanced Power? Extra Power? The only one thing I
know for sure is they run at more MIPS (70) compared to others. I sampled a
33EP256GU806 to test it as soon as possible, and may be also an 256MC806
(without usb) also. It seems a very good micro in 64 pins range.

2012/5/7 Electron <.....electron2k4KILLspamspam.....infinito.it>

>
> Also, IIRC the "H" parts are faster than others.
>
> Cheers,
> Mario
>
>

2012\05\07@084251 by M.L.

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On Mon, May 7, 2012 at 8:09 AM, Vicent Colomar Prats
<EraseMEvicentecolomarspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:
> And the new "EP" is for Enhanced Power? Extra Power? The only one thing I
> know for sure is they run at more MIPS (70) compared to others. I sampled a
> 33EP256GU806 to test it as soon as possible, and may be also an 256MC806
> (without usb) also. It seems a very good micro in 64 pins range.

I'd equate "EP" with extra performance - or something analogous to
lower power since they are both lower power and higher performance
parts.
The pipeline is longer on EP parts, allowing higher clock frequency at
a cost of significantly more difficult to determine instruction rate.
Unloading the pipeline via a jump or branch will take 5 or 6 cycles
IIRC (check the family manual.)

-- Martin K

2012\05\07@090135 by mcd

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Microchip has an archived webinar on the differences in the 18J parts.  I
don't have the original link but one could search for PIC18J_020707.wmv

Only explains the 18J although it does place them relative to the 18K.

My take away was that it was a tradeoff between low price and greatly
reduced flash endurance.  They refer to the 18F as having "premium
features" as compared to the J series.

Presumably the 16 bit reasoning is similar.

--McD

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