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'[PIC] PIC prototype board comments. Eurocard and D'
2005\05\21@065220 by Jan-Erik Soderholm

face picon face
(Thought this needed a separate thread, and in fact maybe should
have been put in an [EE] thread, but anyway...)

I'd just like to put forward *my* view on this DIN/Eurocard issue.

The Eurocard format have been in the electronic industry for
many years, at least as long as I have been, say > 25 years.

It's *mainy* a standard to build rack mounted electronic
equipment, but with the current and constant shrinking of
electronics, there seems to be a little less focus on it today.
(Besides of special derivates like the VME building system, byt
VME uses some special variants of the DIN connectors anyway).

It's a fairly bulky bulding system and most (old) Eurocard
systems was used with parallel-bus (address and data)
bases systems. You know, CPU on one card, RAM on another,
some EEPROM on yet another card, and so on.

The three most common connectors are :
32 pins, two rows with 16 pins on a 0,2" x 0,2" grid.
64 pins, two rows 0.2" apart with 32 pins 0,1" apart (middle row empty).
96 pins, three rows with 32 pins on a  0,1" x 0.1" grid.

Then there are many special types with heavy power pins,
HF koax connectors and such.


Now, due to the simple design of the connectors
themself and also the high degree of standardization of the
hardware (hardly never any problem to mix brands), the
connection system has been popular even amongst hobbyists.
Magazines like Elektor used the Eurocard connectors in many
of theirs early microprocessor/microcontroller projects, but
in recent years there seems to be more single-card designs.


Now back to Olins design...
IMHO, I can't see any larger demand for a Eurocard-style
connector for this kind of board. Maybe a few smaller
"pin-headers" (like on Wouters Dwarf boards). It could even
be simple "unshrouded headers", like the once you use
to create jumper sections. Then you can use a cable with
a socket that is larger then the pin header since it can
stick out on one (or both) sides. This is a prototype
board so you're expected to grab whatever you
happen to have i the junk-box, right ?

Anyway, just IMHO... :-)

Jan-Erik.






2005\05\23@042143 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>The three most common connectors are :
>32 pins, two rows with 16 pins on a 0,2" x 0,2" grid.
>64 pins, two rows 0.2" apart with 32 pins 0,1" apart (middle row empty).
>96 pins, three rows with 32 pins on a  0,1" x 0.1" grid.

There is also a 64 pin 2 rows in a narrow body so that the pins are 0.1 x
0.1 spacing. I used some in a recent project, and would suit Olins
requirements.

2005\05\23@050406 by Chen Xiao Fan

face
flavicon
face
Totally agree with you. Eurocard is not as popular as
before. I work for Peppel+Fuchs and this company is
producing lots of DIN-rail mount (K-system, RPI and
IS-RPI, etc) sensor interface cards for process automation
market. We used to have quite some Euro-card (E-system)
but now other than maintenance, I do not see any new
design. DIN rail mounting is still popular though.

If anyone is interested, you can have a look at the
website (http://www.pepperl-fuchs.com) or the USA
homepage.

Xiaofan

{Original Message removed}

2005\05\23@081330 by olin_piclist

face picon face
Alan B. Pearce wrote:
> There is also a 64 pin 2 rows in a narrow body so that the pins are 0.1
> x
> 0.1 spacing. I used some in a recent project, and would suit Olins
> requirements.

Yup, that's what I used.  I couldn't justify more board area than that for
this feature.  This allows people to install a large number of other types
of one and two row connectors.  Two rows .2" apart wouldn't have done that,
and 3 rows was too much board area.


*****************************************************************
Embed Inc, embedded system specialists in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, http://www.embedinc.com

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