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'[PIC] Networking with PICs ...'
2007\07\22@114228 by jamodio

flavicon

Hi There,

just joined the list. If somebody is interesting to dig into internetworking
with Microchip microcontrollers I did put together several how-to projects,
some based on development boards others showing the detailed schematics.

The project pages are at http://www.ljcv.net/projects/

I also created a modified version of the Microchip TCP/IP stack to make it
more easy to customize and configure.

I'll be around to share some experiences and answer questions.

Cheers
Jorge
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2007\07\22@124501 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 7/22/07, jamodio <spam_OUTjorgeTakeThisOuTspamamodio.biz> wrote:
> just joined the list. If somebody is interesting to dig into internetworking
> with Microchip microcontrollers I did put together several how-to projects,
> some based on development boards others showing the detailed schematics.
>
> The project pages are at http://www.ljcv.net/projects/
>
> I also created a modified version of the Microchip TCP/IP stack to make it
> more easy to customize and configure.
>
> I'll be around to share some experiences and answer questions.
>

Great and welcome! I have not yet played with TCP/IP but I think this
will be a popular subject for [PIC] and [EE].

By the way, why use Nabble? You can just join PIClist and use
email delivery option.
http://mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist

Regards,
Xiaofan

2007\07\23@071901 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> just joined the list. If somebody is interesting to dig into
> internetworking
> with Microchip microcontrollers I did put together several how-to
> projects,
> some based on development boards others showing the detailed
> schematics.
>
> The project pages are at http://www.ljcv.net/projects/

Jorge,

Most impressive.
I rather liked the "two IC's and a plug in breadboard and not much
else at all" version.

Do please join the list via WWW.PICLIST.COM - I can see you'll be a
most handy person to have around :-).
Also quite possible that various people here will be able to be of
service to you as well.


       Russell McMahon




2007\07\24@072952 by Justin Richards

face picon face
I am very interested in gaining some understanding here.

First I need to clarify "Microchip TCP/IP stack"

I understand this to simply mean that Encapsulation up and down the
protocol layers has been 'realised' in a PIC. ie someone (Jorge and
Earlier Microchip) have created the code for a PIC18F4620p to perform
this encapsulation (and de-encapsulation) from the network layer up
and interface to the ENC28J60.

The ENC28J60 provides the electrical interface (similar to rs485) some
buffering and MAC ie the Data Link Layer.

If this is essentially correct with regards to "Microchip TCP/IP
stack" then I will be on my way to filling in the details with all the
available info on the web.  I just need a clear starting point and
understanding of what problem we are trying to solve.

On a related issue the "gruntiest" pic I have ever needed was a 16f628
which I can get from JayCar or Altronics (In South Australia) but
where do I go for PIC18F4550 and the ENC in South Aussie or do I get
them on line.

Any pointers would be great.

Cheers Justin

On 7/23/07, Russell McMahon <.....apptechKILLspamspam@spam@paradise.net.nz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\07\24@123600 by jamodio

flavicon

Hi Justin,

lets see if I can address some of your questions.

The Microchip TCP/IP Stack is an original piece of code created by Microchip
couple of years ago, it evolved from earlier implementations of the IP
protocol using SLIP and PPP and later incorporated support for stand alone
ethernet controllers such as the Realtek RTL8019 and obviously the one
produced by Microchip the ENC28J60. The latest versions of the software also
support the new PIC18FXXJ60 family of microcontrollers which include the
ethernet controller inside the same chip and instead of using SPI to access
it registers, they are all mapped as regular SFRs on the PIC.
The software is license free but has some restrictions, for example you can
not
port it to other vendor's MCUs like an Atmel AVR.
The latest version is 4.02 and you can get more information on-line about
it at http://www.microchip.com/tcpip/

What I did, since the code has a lot of heritage and changes over time, I
took
the 3.75 version (4.02 was not available yet among other reasons why I chose
this version) and did a lot of cleanup, completely reorganized the code,
fixed
some things here and there, changed substantially the way many features and
parameters are configured, replaced the LCD drivers by my own and added
a software implementation of Real Time Clock and Calendar and a SNTP
(Simple Network Time Protocol) client to synchronize the clock with a NTP
server over the internet.

My primary goal was to have a decent code base, more easy to read and
modify to develop some other projects on top of it.

The code supports a large collection of MCUs, including 16-bit ones like
PIC24
and dsPIC33, but not PIC16 due the limitations on program memory and RAM.

For PIC18 one of my favorites part for this type of development is the
PIC18F4620, or PIC18F2620 if you need fewer pins, it has a reasonable
amount of program memory and RAM to play with, advanced peripherals, etc.

Obviously running a full TCP/IP stack on a PIC microcontroller has some
trade-offs due the amount of resources you have available on the MCU,
here there is no underlying operating system taking care of some stuff and
some creative coding to implement some level of multitasting, this
particular implementation uses what is known as "cooperative multitasking",
and includes for example a basic web server, a ftp server to update
the web pages if you have them stored in an external serial EEPROM,
you can ping to it, obtain the IP address via DHCP, etc.

It's not just encapsulation for each protocol layer, there are several
state machines to take care of the different states for each protocol
and some level of processing and clever ways to create web pages with
sort of dynamic contents (such as the state of I/O pins, output of
the ADC, etc).

About the ENC28J60, it's not just the electrical interface, the
ethernet standard requires specific encoding, signaling and framing,
and as you said all the MAC and DLL layer functionality plus in
this particular case the proper signaling for ethernet over twisted
pairs or 10BaseT.

One of the challenges in the past using stand alone ethernet
controllers was the number of pins required for the bus interface
between the MCU and the controller, there are many approaches out
there using NE2000 or ISA style interfaces, what the ENC28J60 brings
to the picture is a very simple serial interface (SPI) very small
foot print on different packages including 28 pin DIP very handy
for hobby or development projects. Despite using the SPI interface,
with SCK at 10MHz the performance is quite good compared with using
another controller with a parallel interface. One con, the chip is
a power hog, it needs between 120-180mA and may dissipate up to 600mW.

Based more or less on the same architecture Microchip released
this year a new family of PIC18F MCUs that incorporate sort of
the ENC28J60 inside the same piece of silicon as the MCU, the
largest pin count part is the 100-pin PIC18F97J60.

About getting the parts I'm not familiar with distributors in
Australia but I have some Aussie friends that normally get them
on line, you can try with Microchip direct, and also you can
register with them (http://sample.microchip.com/) to obtain
some free samples for these parts, they have a very good samples
program and several of the projects I put together ( you can
see the pictures at http://www.ljcv.net/projects/mchptcp3.75/hardware.html)
were done using sample parts.

Hope this helps ...

Regards
Jorge

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2007\07\24@123913 by jamodio

flavicon

Hi Xiaofan,

Thanks for the welcome. I find using Nabble more convenient when I'm not
in my PC with access to my email, I get the digest via the PIClist but I
like the Nabble interface to navigate through the different threads.

Any good reasons why not to use Nabble ?

Regards
Jorge


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2007\07\24@163229 by Andy Tuthill

picon face
Hi Justin,

I can't help with the networking side but I'll offer my two cents on
suppliers.  Jaycar and Dontronics are both good for a lot of things, but if
you want micros at the best prices and selection I go to Microchip Direct.  
Its the same for Maxim too, some parts are hard to get from normal suppliers
like RS and Farnell so I bypass them.

I hope my opinion from across the Tasman helps.

Regards,
Andy

_________________________________________________________________
http://imagine-windowslive.com/hotmail/?locale=en-us&ocid=TXT_TAGHM_migration_HM_mini_pcmag_0507

2007\07\25@214807 by Justin Richards

face picon face
Hi Jorge (and others),

thanks for the responses.  I have always wanted to experiment in this
area (just love the idea of small remotely powered ip addressable
devices that I can effectively access from anywhere on the planet) and
now have some basic grounding to build on.

I had entertained the idea of interfacing to an ISA or PCMCIA network
adapter but as you have pointed out would be bulky etc.

This will be one of those long slowly developing projects for me but I
can see I am going to enjoy the jorney.

Thanks again

Justin

On 7/25/07, jamodio <jorgespamKILLspamamodio.biz> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2007\07\25@221918 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 7/24/07, jamodio <.....jorgeKILLspamspam.....amodio.biz> wrote:
> Thanks for the welcome. I find using Nabble more convenient when I'm not
> in my PC with access to my email, I get the digest via the PIClist but I
> like the Nabble interface to navigate through the different threads.
>
> Any good reasons why not to use Nabble ?
>

Maybe because of the extra lines attached. The other might be related
to the way Nabble archives the PIClist.

Yes I know that digest mode is not a good way to read PIClist. It is very
troublesome to reply an email.

And I feel there is a sense of belonging here if you really subscribe to
the PIClist and not through the Nabble interface. Those who send posts
through Nabble normally disappear very fast.

Just my observations.

Regards,
Xiaofan

2007\07\26@140325 by Dario Greggio

face picon face
jamodio wrote:

> just joined the list. If somebody is interesting to dig into internetworking

welcome Jorge ! :)

--
Ciao, Dario

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