Searching \ for '[PIC] Migrating from 16Fxx' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=16F
Search entire site for: 'Migrating from 16Fxx'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[PIC] Migrating from 16Fxx'
2010\07\22@215838 by David Duffy (AVD)

flavicon
face
This may sound a little vague, but here goes. I've always used the 12 &
16 series chips and have resisted change.

I'm looking to use some flash memory (3V) for a new project, and thought
it may be time to look at a new low cost micro.

The PicKit 3 I bought recently came with a 18F45K20, but I haven't
played around with it yet.

Browsing the Microchip web site has only left me confused - they are
just so many chips these days!

Is there such a thing as a popular (economical & readily available) chip
that I should look at?
David...

--
___________________________________________
David Duffy        Audio Visual Devices P/L
Unit 8, 10 Hook St, Capalaba 4157 Australia
Ph: +61 7 38235717      Fax: +61 7 38234717
Our Web Site: http://www.audiovisualdevices.com.au
___________________________________________

2010\07\22@234622 by ivp

face picon face
> Is there such a thing as a popular (economical & readily available)
> chip that I should look at?

For general purpose use you might look at successors to familiar 16F
chips. The 18F4520 (40 pin), 18F2520 (28 pin), 18F1320 (18 pin) for
example. Then there are those with added features such as USB and
higher operating speed, like the 18F4550, 18F2550

It's not often I consider a 16F first for a new project

I agree about the size of the range now. You could be there all day
just looking

*
*
**********
Quality PIC programmers
http://www.embedinc.com/products/index.htm

2010\07\23@000639 by David Duffy (AVD)

flavicon
face
On 23/07/2010 1:46 PM, ivp wrote:
>> Is there such a thing as a popular (economical&  readily available)
>> chip that I should look at?
>>      
> For general purpose use you might look at successors to familiar 16F
> chips. The 18F4520 (40 pin), 18F2520 (28 pin), 18F1320 (18 pin) for
> example. Then there are those with added features such as USB and
> higher operating speed, like the 18F4550, 18F2550
>    

The 18F1320 has a quite different pinout. If there were one that was pin
compatible (ports & uart pins) with 16F88, I could have a go at porting
an existing project over.
David...

--
___________________________________________
David Duffy        Audio Visual Devices P/L
Unit 8, 10 Hook St, Capalaba 4157 Australia
Ph: +61 7 38235717      Fax: +61 7 38234717
Our Web Site: http://www.audiovisualdevices.com.au
___________________________________________

2010\07\23@004034 by V G

picon face
On Thu, Jul 22, 2010 at 9:58 PM, David Duffy (AVD)
<spam_OUTdavidTakeThisOuTspamaudiovisualdevices.com.au> wrote:
> This may sound a little vague, but here goes. I've always used the 12 &
> 16 series chips and have resisted change.
>
> I'm looking to use some flash memory (3V) for a new project, and thought
> it may be time to look at a new low cost micro.
>
> The PicKit 3 I bought recently came with a 18F45K20, but I haven't
> played around with it yet.
>
> Browsing the Microchip web site has only left me confused - they are
> just so many chips these days!
>
> Is there such a thing as a popular (economical & readily available) chip
> that I should look at?
> David...

I personally like the PIC18F2620 (5 V, 8 bit, MCU) and
dsPIC33FJ128GP802 (3 V, 16 bit, DSC). Both 28 pin dip with highest (or
nearly so) flash and RAM for their class.

2010\07\23@024424 by ivp

face picon face
> The 18F1320 has a quite different pinout. If there were one that
> was pin compatible (ports & uart pins) with 16F88, I could have
> a go at porting an existing project over

Yes, that is true about the pinout. It's a nuisance if you have PCBs
and find that INT isn't where it used to be for example. Aside from
that, porting will be firly simple but involves some s/w adjustment

The 18F has a few more instructions, some new (eg TABLE, MULxx,
CPFSxx etc) and some modifications. FSRx instead of FSR, RLCF/
RLNCF for RLF for instance

I did port quite a few related projects over from the 88 to the 1320
and had no particular problems. The minimal time spent doing it was
well worth the effort. Particularly in one set of boards which needed
to process ASCII strings. The multiple FSRs and better RAM
organisation turned a horrible swapping and copying mess (F88) into
a quick and efficient handling routine (F1320)

Please do try the 18F, and even the 24F, 30F and 33F. You won't
be disappointed

For programming I recommend Olin's (see my signature). They are
inexpensive and run independently of MPLAB. Which is an absolute
boon now that MPLAB is unable to open a SIM and programmer
at the same time

Joe

*
*
**********
Quality PIC programmers
http://www.embedinc.com/products/index.htm


2010\07\23@063540 by Alan B Pearce

face picon face
> Please do try the 18F, and even the 24F, 30F and 33F. You won't
> be disappointed

I would strongly suggest skipping the 18F series and look at the small
24F devices. They get down to 18 pin IIRC.

Reasons -

Much nicer interrupt structure (each interrupt has its own vector that
can be prioritised to one of 7 levels).
The architecture does away with all the RAM banking and ROM paging that
the smaller devices have.
The USB devices can be run as master or OTG (18F chips are USB Device
only).
Many devices have digital peripherals where you can select the pins
(within a limited range) that you want them to come out to.

The C30 compiler covers all the devices that Joe listed here except the
18F, so once you have the compiler there is a wide range of devices
available to you.
--
Scanned by iCritical.

2010\07\23@072010 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
David Duffy (AVD) wrote:
> I'm looking to use some flash memory (3V) for a new project, and
> thought it may be time to look at a new low cost micro.

What does a micro have to do with flash memory?  If you want flash memory,
go get flash memory.

> Is there such a thing as a popular (economical & readily available)
> chip that I should look at?

All PICs are economical and readily available, but I don't know about
popular.  If you're trying to pick a generic one for possible future hobby
projects, try the 18F2620 in 28 pins or the 18F4620 in 44 pins.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2010\07\23@090202 by Carl Denk

flavicon
face
I think the 18F1320 has maximum amount of memory for a 18 pin PIC. I
have one that, every time I change something slightly in the program, I
have to move some storage around.

On 7/23/2010 12:06 AM, David Duffy (AVD) wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2010\07\23@172417 by V G

picon face
On Fri, Jul 23, 2010 at 4:16 PM, Jan-Erik Soderholm
<.....jan-erik.soderholmKILLspamspam@spam@telia.com> wrote:
> It's against the datasheet to touch the ball by the hands
> in football anyway. The referee will blow his whistle and the
> other team will get a free-kick (and possible the offender will
> get a caution). Only the goalkeeper may touch the ball by hands.
>
> At least according to *my* football datasheet.
>
> A beer sounds fine anyway, at long as it's not a US beer. :-)

I was referring to American Football, but even if you were talking
about soccer, the goalie can touch the ball with his hands

2010\07\23@181452 by David Duffy (AVD)

flavicon
face
Dwayne Reid wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Hi Dwayne,
Yes, you (and almost everyone else) read it the way I intended. :-)

I've now looked at the 18F & 24F series, and for now the 18F seems the way to go. Some of the extra instructions do seem useful.

If I was into C programming, migrating may be easier. At present I just don't "get" C, so I write in assembly. I do quite like knowing what every register and bit does.

Unlike some list members, for me PIC programming is only a small portion of my business activities. I just don't have enough hours in the day to make quantum leaps in technology. Thanks everyone for their input.
David...

-- ___________________________________________
David Duffy        Audio Visual Devices P/L
Unit 8, 10 Hook St, Capalaba 4157 Australia
Ph: +61 7 38235717      Fax: +61 7 38234717
Our Web Site: http://www.audiovisualdevices.com.au
___________________________________________

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2010 , 2011 only
- Today
- New search...