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'[PIC] IR Remote control'
2006\09\27@174427 by Jason

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Can anyone point me to a good tutorial on building an IR remote control system?

I'd like to have several transmitters each with a single signal they can output and one receiver that identifies which transmitter signalled it.

The problem is I don't know how to read the signal coming in.  

Thanks,
 Jason

2006\09\27@180349 by Robert Rolf

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K.I.S.S. Keep it simple stupid.

Simplest is to use variable pulse width for each transmitter.
Measure the received pulse width and categorize. (using any one of a dozen
different IR receiver chips).

Throw away measurements that aren't within a few percent of expected
widths as 'interference'. Use prime number widths to ensure uniqueness
even when two transmitters send simultaneously.

556 timer chip can do the transmitter side easily.(carrier + width).
Any low end PIC can measure millisecond wide pulses and decode into #n pressed.


Robert

Jason wrote:

> Can anyone point me to a good tutorial on building an IR remote control system?
>
> I'd like to have several transmitters each with a single signal they can output and one receiver that identifies which transmitter signalled it.
>
> The problem is I don't know how to read the signal coming in.  
>
> Thanks,
>   Jason

2006\09\27@190554 by Jason

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Interesting.  That would save the trouble of figuring out how to decode a
bitstream.

How would I time the pulse though?  Is this where the CCP module comes in?

From: "Robert Rolf" <spam_OUTRobert.RolfTakeThisOuTspamualberta.ca>
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 3:03 PM


> K.I.S.S. Keep it simple stupid.
>
> Simplest is to use variable pulse width for each transmitter.
> Measure the received pulse width and categorize. (using any one of a dozen
> different IR receiver chips).


2006\09\27@203957 by Robert Rolf

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Jason wrote:

> Interesting.  That would save the trouble of figuring out how to decode a
> bitstream.
>
> How would I time the pulse though?  Is this where the CCP module comes in?

Yes.
Or a timing loop polling the I/R input pin.

Or use an LM3915 linear bar graph LED driver, current source and timing cap
to create a ramp that starts at the leading edge of the pulse, and
holds at the end, and the 3915 selects an output based on the ramp level=width.
There are dozens of ways to do this.
I'll not be doing your homework for you.

R

2006\09\28@011918 by Jason

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From: "Robert Rolf" <.....Robert.RolfKILLspamspam@spam@ualberta.ca>
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 5:39 PM


> I'll not be doing your homework for you.

It's not homework, and I really don't appriciate your implication that it
is.

All I asked for originally was a tutorial on building an IR remote system.


2006\09\28@012859 by Shawn Wilton

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I think he means that he doesn't want to do all the research and explanation
for you.  Don't think he was really implying it's homework for a class.



On 9/27/06, Jason <picspamKILLspamcanadaspeaks.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

--

Shawn Wilton (b9 Systems)
http://b9Systems.com  <- New web page

2006\09\28@094752 by Mike Hord

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How about some search terms?  The most common IR
remote control schemes are (IIRC) RECS80 and RC5.
You could do a search for sony remote control signal
and you'll find a plethora of pages about it.  Sony has
a very commonly copied method of IR control- you'll
find more information out there than you know what to
do with.

Mike H.

On 9/27/06, Jason <EraseMEpicspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTcanadaspeaks.com> wrote:
> Can anyone point me to a good tutorial on building an IR remote control system?
>
> I'd like to have several transmitters each with a single signal they can output and one receiver that identifies which transmitter signalled it.
>
> The problem is I don't know how to read the signal coming in.
>
> Thanks,
>   Jason
> -


'[PIC] IR Remote control'
2006\10\01@100001 by John Ferrell
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I think it a fair question.

Google it and you will be over run with more than you ever wanted to know.
It is not easy to find a "simple tutorial" on this subject.

If you find one please bring it back to the list, I hate it when I find
myself reinventing the wheel!


John Ferrell    W8CCW
"My Competition is not my enemy"
http://DixieNC.US

{Original Message removed}

2006\10\01@172052 by William Chops Westfield

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On Sep 27, 2006, at 2:44 PM, Jason wrote:

> I'd like to have several transmitters each with a single signal
> they can output and one receiver that identifies which
> transmitter signalled it.
>
How difficult this is will depend on how much you're willing to
delve in building it yourself, or kludging things together.

The "standard" IR remote controls use an on/off modulation of an
approximately 40KHz carrier signal.  The transmitter is little
more than a gated oscillator, and those little receiver modules
do the hard work of detecting the signal and stripping the bits
from the carrier, and give you the original bitstream back.

Multiple vendors are handled in one of three ways:
1) different carrier frequencies.
2) Different "protocols", or formatting of the bitstream
3) Within a particular protocol, change the values of bitfields
   with particular meanings, like "vendor" and "device"

So if you have three remote controls for a particular philips TV,
they're all going to send out the same codes and you won't be able
to tell them apart.  If you have a JVC, a Panasonic, and a GE remote,
you can tell them apart but they don't look the same.  The easiest
way to have three "identical" remotes be individually detectable is
to buy "universal" remotes and set each one up for a different
vendor, but that won't work if you're "eavesdropping" on a signal
instead of being the only receiver.

A popular IR protocol is the Philips RC5 protocol.  Google for
'RC5 IR' and you'll get relevant hits...

BillW

2006\10\03@052544 by Jason

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Thanks for your support John.

This is for a project I've had on the back burner for a while now.  The
problem is exactly as you said, I get a huge number of hits but nothing
simple and starting from the beginning.

Maybe my best bet is to buy someone's pre-programmed Sony decoding chip and
see if I can generate the Sony codes.

From: "John Ferrell" <johnferrellspamspam_OUTearthlink.net>
Sent: Sunday, October 01, 2006 7:02 AM

>I think it a fair question.
>
> Google it and you will be over run with more than you ever wanted to know.
> It is not easy to find a "simple tutorial" on this subject.
>
> If you find one please bring it back to the list, I hate it when I find
> myself reinventing the wheel!


2006\10\03@144107 by Richard Prosser

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Jason,
(Sacrilege under a PIC header but -)
One possibility you might like to look  at is to switch to an AVR.
Then you can use BASCOM for programming & it includes RC5 functions
built-in. You can expand into assembler programming from there if
required. The demo version is free & I think should be adequate for
your needs. There may also be PIC based BASIC compilers that include
the required functionality but I don't know enough about PIC BASIC
compilers to advise.

Richard P

On 03/10/06, Jason <@spam@picKILLspamspamcanadaspeaks.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2006\10\03@152444 by alan smith

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here is something from the archives that might help...
 
 There is also a type of inexpensive remote control usually sold under
the Radio Shack or All-In-One brands that has been reverse engineered
and can be completely reprogrammed using a cable (dubbed a JP1 Cable)
hooked up to the parallel port of a PC. And I don't mean the relatively
small "learning" memory that many remotes have. I mean that you can
completely reprogram virtually every button on the remotes, even if it
didn't originally even support your device. There is a pretty good
overview of these remotes and reprogramming them here
(http://www.hifi-remote.com/ofa/nuts-volts.shtml), but there is a lot
more information here: (http://www.hifi-remote.com/jp1/index.shtml) and
there is a Yahoo Group on the subject here:
(http://groups.yahoo.com/group/jp1/)

The short story is that there is a little header tucked away in the
battery compartment of some remotes that is apparently used by the
manufacturer to program the remotes. Somebody reverse engineered the
interface and now you can custom design The Perfect Remote for your
entertainment center using a remote that only costs $10 to $30 USD. All
you have to do is put the codes in an MS Excel spreadsheet and download
a freeware program called IR.exe and update the remote using your JP1
cable.

I imagine that this JP1 interface might be fertile ground for some
interesting PIC hacks. :-)



               
---------------------------------
Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls.  Great rates starting at 1¢/min.

2006\10\03@155117 by David VanHorn

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On 10/3/06, Richard Prosser <RemoveMErhprosserTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com> wrote:
>
> Jason,
> (Sacrilege under a PIC header but -)
> One possibility you might like to look  at is to switch to an AVR.


Looks fine to me! :)

Then you can use BASCOM for programming & it includes RC5 functions
> built-in. You can expand into assembler programming from there if
> required. The demo version is free & I think should be adequate for
> your needs. There may also be PIC based BASIC compilers that include
> the required functionality but I don't know enough about PIC BASIC
> compilers to advise.


I'm no fan of bascom, but as you say, get it working first in HLL, then code
small in asm.


--
> Feel the power of the dark side!  Atmel AVR

2006\10\03@161703 by Jagath Ekanayake

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Try http://www.rentron.com . Good examples are there, but in Basic though.

JC

>>> spamBeGonepicspamBeGonespamcanadaspeaks.com 03/10/06 22:25:36 >>>
Thanks for your support John.

This is for a project I've had on the back burner for a while now.  The

problem is exactly as you said, I get a huge number of hits but nothing

simple and starting from the beginning.

Maybe my best bet is to buy someone's pre-programmed Sony decoding chip
and
see if I can generate the Sony codes.

From: "John Ferrell" <TakeThisOuTjohnferrellEraseMEspamspam_OUTearthlink.net>
Sent: Sunday, October 01, 2006 7:02 AM

>I think it a fair question.
>
> Google it and you will be over run with more than you ever wanted to
know.
> It is not easy to find a "simple tutorial" on this subject.
>
> If you find one please bring it back to the list, I hate it when I
find
> myself reinventing the wheel!


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