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'[PIC] Grill temperature controller (Forgot to put '
2010\01\09@132500 by RANDY ABERNATHY

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Hello:
 
I am working on a project that requires temperature control in a wood pellet fired BBQ grill.  I would like to use the PIC16C72A chip.
 
The control will be doing at least the following:
 
1. Provide power to an "ignitor" for a set period of time to ignite the wook pellets
2. Provide power to a small AC gearmotor to turn a feed auger to supply the pellets to the firebox
3. Accept input from an RTD temperature sensor
4. Turn the auger motor on and off based on temperature and also, in some modes, based upon timing controlled by a BCD switch.
5. Provide power to a small AC fan for air supply to the firebox.
 
This is a loose description but hopefully enough to let you know what I am attempting.
 
Being one that doesn't believe in re-inventing the wheel, I was hoping someone on the list might have done this or have some insight into it.  By the way, I use PicBasic Pro.

Randy Abernathy
CNC and Industrial Machinery
service, repair, installation and
design

4626 Old Stilesboro Rd NW
Acworth, GA 30101
Fax: 770-974-5295
Phone: 678-982-0235
E-mail:
spam_OUTrandyabernathyTakeThisOuTspambellsouth.net

2010\01\09@133713 by jim

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Randy,

Several years ago, I designed for my brother-in-law a controller that does
basically what you have described for his pellet burning space heater stove.
I'll ask him if it is okay that I give it out.  If he says yes, I'll send
you the source code.  You will have to modify it slightly to work with your
particular setup, but it should save you a lot of time.  I wrote it for a
16F628
if I remember correctly because that is what I had on hand at the time.

Regards,

Jim

{Original Message removed}

2010\01\09@150753 by Marcel Duchamp

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On 1/9/2010 9:24 AM, RANDY ABERNATHY wrote:
> Hello:
>
> I am working on a project that requires temperature control in a wood
> pellet fired BBQ grill.  I would like to use the PIC16C72A chip.
>
> This is a loose description but hopefully enough to let you know what
> I am attempting.
>
> Being one that doesn't believe in re-inventing the wheel, I was
> hoping someone on the list might have done this or have some insight
> into it.  By the way, I use PicBasic Pro.

This sounds like a straight forward project as long as you take care of
any possible hazardous outcomes.

However, I think you will be disappointed with your choice of PIC.  The
'C' versions are one time programmable; you will either need to be
extremely good at programming (no bugs, no forgotten features, etc.) or
will need to have a stack of them on hand to make changes to.  Maybe you
have a stack on hand and just want to use them up; if not, consider
replacing it with an 'F' version, such as PIC16Fxxx or PIC18Fxxx.

2010\01\09@160042 by RANDY ABERNATHY

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Actually Marcel, I will be using a PIC16F72 series for the code testing, etc.  It is just that for the actual application we don't want to use re-programmable ucontrollers.  I am hoping to just not have to write everything from scratch if something is already out there from someone here on the list.
 
Thank you replying.

Randy Abernathy
CNC and Industrial Machinery
service, repair, installation and
design

4626 Old Stilesboro Rd NW
Acworth, GA 30101
Fax: 770-974-5295
Phone: 678-982-0235
E-mail:
.....randyabernathyKILLspamspam@spam@bellsouth.net

--- On Sat, 1/9/10, Marcel Duchamp <marcel.duchampspamKILLspamsbcglobal.net> wrote:


From: Marcel Duchamp <.....marcel.duchampKILLspamspam.....sbcglobal.net>
Subject: Re: [PIC] Grill temperature controller (Forgot to put PIC in subject line earlier)
To: "Microcontroller discussion list - Public." <EraseMEpiclistspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu>
Date: Saturday, January 9, 2010, 3:07 PM


On 1/9/2010 9:24 AM, RANDY ABERNATHY wrote:
{Quote hidden}

This sounds like a straight forward project as long as you take care of
any possible hazardous outcomes.

However, I think you will be disappointed with your choice of PIC.  The
'C' versions are one time programmable; you will either need to be
extremely good at programming (no bugs, no forgotten features, etc.) or
will need to have a stack of them on hand to make changes to.  Maybe you
have a stack on hand and just want to use them up; if not, consider
replacing it with an 'F' version, such as PIC16Fxxx or PIC18Fxxx.

2010\01\10@001647 by Charles Craft

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Not exactly the same project but might help:

Microprocessor Controlled Wood Stove Part 1
Microcontroller/PIC
Nuts & Volts Magazine (October 2008)
By Kerry Barlow

http://www.nutsvolts.com/index.php?/magazine/article/microprocessor_controlled_wood_stove_part_1

Microprocessor Controlled Wood Stove Part 2
Read the Digital Edition (subscribers only!)

In Part 1, software and closed loop theory for the wood stove temperature controller was covered. This article will detail the actual hardware of the controller and how everything interacts.
Electronic Gadgets
Nuts & Volts Magazine (November 2008)
By Kerry Barlow

http://www.nutsvolts.com/index.php?/magazine/article/microprocessor_controlled_wood_stove_part_2


{Original Message removed}

2010\01\10@003828 by John Gardner

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These guys have a tutorial on PID which uses a BBQ controller as an example...

www.parallax.com/dl/docs/article/GeekHousech8.pdf

2010\01\10@062512 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>>I am working on a project that requires temperature control
>>in a wood pellet fired BBQ grill. I would like to use the
>>PIC16C72A chip.

>These guys have a tutorial on PID which uses a BBQ controller as an
>example...


I remember back in the very early days of the microprocessor era (when every
company seemed to have an architecture of their own) there was an article in
Electronics magazine (I think this eventually became EDN) where a guy
described using a SC/MP micro to control the flue flap on his wood stove. He
measured the exhaust temperature from the flue, and adjusted the flap to
keep this constant. When it got to the point where the flap was fully open,
and the temperature had fallen a preset amount, it rang an alarm, at which
point he put more wood on the fire. Once the fire came good it would close
the flap to stay inside the control loop again. At the time I thought it a
neat project, but seemed to be a bit of a waste of a micro chip, to dedicate
a whole chip to just this job.

Sort of thing one could do with a more modern chip running at very slow
clock speed.

But coming back on topic, Microchip have a neat looking app note where they
describe using an 18F chip, with a bunch of their own analogue chips to do
cold junction compensation for a thermocouple, and have it doing 0.1C
accuracy measurements over -100C to 1000C (assuming you have a thermocouple
with suitable insulation for the upper range, most commercially available
items don't seem to have insulation good for more than about 300C). Check
out AN1306 at ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/AppNotes/01306a.pdf
The principle should be applicable to the chip you propose to use.


2010\01\10@205413 by Xiaofan Chen

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On Sun, Jan 10, 2010 at 5:00 AM, RANDY ABERNATHY
<randyabernathyspamspam_OUTbellsouth.net> wrote:
> Actually Marcel, I will be using a PIC16F72 series for the code testing, etc.
> It is just that for the actual application we don't want to use re-programmable
> ucontrollers.  I am hoping to just not have to write everything from scratch if
> something is already out there from someone here on the list.

What is the reason of not using re-programmable MCUs? PIC16C72A is quite
old (my first PIC project back in 1999/2000 used it and the product is still
in production now at >100k/year run rate for my previous employer). It is
probably more expensive than PIC16F72 now. And if you want to use
in circuit debugging, PIC16F72 is not a good choice either as it does not
have the debugging silicon built-in. Maybe the newer PIC16F72x or other
PICs are better and cheaper.

--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

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